The Retirement Wisdom Podcast https://www.retirementwisdom.com Retirement podcast on how to retire well. It’s about much more than money. Sun, 01 Dec 2019 05:16:09 +0000 en hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3 This retirement podcast covers the changing nature of retirement today. Our guests offer useful insights on how to retire as well as the non-financial aspects of a successful retirement transition including retiring early, working longer and making a career shift in pre-retirement. Retirement Wisdom clean episodic Retirement Wisdom retirementwisdom2017@gmail.com retirementwisdom2017@gmail.com (Retirement Wisdom) Retirement Wisdom LLC Transition Coaching for Career and Retirement The Retirement Wisdom Podcast https://www.retirementwisdom.com/wp-content/uploads/powerpress/Retirement_Wisdom_podcast_image_1119.png https://www.retirementwisdom.com TV-G Advice for Successful Career Women Transitioning to Retirement – Helen Dennis https://www.retirementwisdom.com/women-transitioning-to-retirement/ Mon, 25 Nov 2019 13:11:32 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=13065 What retirement advice for women would an expert offer?  Helen Dennis has helped thousands prepare for the non-financial side of retirement planning.  She recently celebrated the 18th anniversary of her popular weekly column Successful Aging. In this episode of our retirement podcast we asked Helen to share her views on a range of topics that can help you retire smarter: Why the term retirement needs to be retired The back story of Project Renewment ® The key themes she’s seeing in Project Renewment®  groups What the different issues are that men face in this phase of life What gets in the way of freedom in retirement The pros and cons of a busy retirement What Joy has to do with retirement Her advice on how to navigate the transition from a full-time career to retirement Wise Quotes On Life Purpose and Retirement “I think that's one of the biggest challenges for retirement. Because when you're working, you don't have to think about purpose. You know exactly why you're there. You know what you're supposed to do, you know the expectations and you know the rewards. So, someone says, what is your purpose in life? As you're working 50 hours a week, you say: my purpose in life is I get to work, do my job to support my family. So now we take all of that away and said, you know, it's almost existential. You say, well, who am I now? Why am I on this planet? What is meaningful to me? And if you've never thought about that for the past 35 years or 40 years of your career. This is possibly a new thought and a new conversation. I think it is absolutely fundamental to have a meaningful purpose in retirement,  to have some sense of purpose - and it can be a journey." "Your purpose in the first five years may be a different purpose in the next five years. I think it's a journey. I think talking about it in groups, in conversation groups - even with your book group - is very helpful. I think finding purpose can be hard as a solo activity. I think it's one of the biggest challenges in retirement. You could be busy, you'd have a full calendar, but that sense of purpose may be missing - and a big piece of purpose often is giving back. That can be a very fulfilling aspect. It's a challenge. It's a process.”   On the Freedom of Retirement – and Life Changes “Well, I think there is this feeling, particularly if you've had a high-pressure job, if you're commuting in Los Angeles, and if you've had 12 changes in management that now you can breathe and say, Oh my God, I am finally free. I can sleep longer. I can breathe, I don't have to hyperventilate. And so, there is this great feeling of freedom and then the unexpected occurs.  The unexpected like your adult children move home for whatever reason. We have grandparents raising grandchildren. The biggest one that seems to move into this space of freedom is caregiving. So, I think what we need to prepare for it is that freedom is not 100% of everything. We may have freedom and spirit, freedom of movement, freedom of thought. But we do have responsibilities. And the biggest one that seems to come in is caregiving.”   On Joy and Retirement “We have a lot of environmental influences that can creep into our joy. And I love the definition of joy is the feeling of grinning inside…There are a lot of complexities of life and people go through their own struggles and yet you say, okay, this is a joyful time of your life." "Joy is not a word that is usually associated with aging and you don't usually hear joy and retirement. So, it's trying to shake that paradigm a little bit to say this has the potential to be the most joyful period of our lives. And when people are looking for joy, you're saying, all right, how do I make myself joyful?”   Bio Helen Dennis is a nationally recognized leader on issues of aging, employment and retirement with academic, corporate and nonprofit experience. She has received awards for her university teaching at US... What retirement advice for women would an expert offer?  Helen Dennis has helped thousands prepare for the non-financial side of retirement planning.  She recently celebrated the 18th anniversary of her popular weekly column Successful Aging. In this episode of our retirement podcast we asked Helen to share her views on a range of topics that can help you retire smarter:

  • Why the term retirement needs to be retired
  • The back story of Project Renewment ®
  • The key themes she’s seeing in Project Renewment®  groups
  • What the different issues are that men face in this phase of life
  • What gets in the way of freedom in retirement
  • The pros and cons of a busy retirement
  • What Joy has to do with retirement
  • Her advice on how to navigate the transition from a full-time career to retirement

Wise Quotes

On Life Purpose and Retirement

“I think that’s one of the biggest challenges for retirement. Because when you’re working, you don’t have to think about purpose. You know exactly why you’re there. You know what you’re supposed to do, you know the expectations and you know the rewards. So, someone says, what is your purpose in life? As you’re working 50 hours a week, you say: my purpose in life is I get to work, do my job to support my family. So now we take all of that away and said, you know, it’s almost existential. You say, well, who am I now? Why am I on this planet? What is meaningful to me? And if you’ve never thought about that for the past 35 years or 40 years of your career. This is possibly a new thought and a new conversation. I think it is absolutely fundamental to have a meaningful purpose in retirement,  to have some sense of purpose – and it can be a journey.”

“Your purpose in the first five years may be a different purpose in the next five years. I think it’s a journey. I think talking about it in groups, in conversation groups – even with your book group – is very helpful. I think finding purpose can be hard as a solo activity. I think it’s one of the biggest challenges in retirement. You could be busy, you’d have a full calendar, but that sense of purpose may be missing – and a big piece of purpose often is giving back. That can be a very fulfilling aspect. It’s a challenge. It’s a process.”

 

On the Freedom of Retirement – and Life Changes

“Well, I think there is this feeling, particularly if you’ve had a high-pressure job, if you’re commuting in Los Angeles, and if you’ve had 12 changes in management that now you can breathe and say, Oh my God, I am finally free. I can sleep longer. I can breathe, I don’t have to hyperventilate. And so, there is this great feeling of freedom and then the unexpected occurs.  The unexpected like your adult children move home for whatever reason. We have grandparents raising grandchildren. The biggest one that seems to move into this space of freedom is caregiving. So, I think what we need to prepare for it is that freedom is not 100% of everything. We may have freedom and spirit, freedom of movement, freedom of thought. But we do have responsibilities. And the biggest one that seems to come in is caregiving.”

 

On Joy and Retirement

“We have a lot of environmental influences that can creep into our joy. And I love the definition of joy is the feeling of grinning inside…There are a lot of complexities of life and people go through their own struggles and yet you say, okay, this is a joyful time of your life.”

“Joy is not a word that is usually associated with aging and you don’t usually hear joy and retirement. So, it’s trying to shake that paradigm a little bit to say this has the potential to be the most joyful period of our lives. And when people are looking for joy, you’re saying, all right, how do I make myself joyful?”

 

Bio

Helen Dennis is a nationally recognized leader on issues of aging, employment and retirement with academic, corporate and nonprofit experience. She has received awards for her university teaching at USC’s Davis School, Andrus Gerontology Center and for her contributions to the field of aging, the community and literary arts. She has edited two books and written more than 100 articles and has frequent speaking engagements. She is the weekly columnist on Successful Aging for the Southern California Newspaper Group and has assisted more than 15,000 employees in preparation for the non-financial aspects of retirement. In her volunteer life, she has served as president of five nonprofit organizations. Fully engaged in the field of aging, she was a delegate to a White House Conference on Aging and is co-author of the Los Angeles Times bestseller, “Project Renewment®: The First Retirement Model for Career Women.” Helen has extensive experience with the media including Prime Time, NPR, network news, the Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, Sacramento Bee and Christian Science Monitor. She recently has been recognized by PBS Next Avenue as one of the 50 Influencers in Aging.

Project Renewment is available on Amazon

 

Websites:

www.HelenMDennis.com

Project Renewment

Sucessful Aging column

 

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Interested in starting a Project Renewment®  group and have questions? Contact Helen Dennis at helendenn@aol.com

 

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What retirement advice for women would an expert offer?  Helen Dennis has helped thousands prepare for the non-financial side of retirement planning.  She recently celebrated the 18th anniversary of her popular weekly column Successful Aging. What retirement advice for women would an expert offer?  Helen Dennis has helped thousands prepare for the non-financial side of retirement planning.  She recently celebrated the 18th anniversary of her popular weekly column Successful Aging. In this episode of our retirement podcast we asked Helen to share her views on a range of topics that can help you retire smarter:<br /> <br /> Why the term retirement needs to be retired<br /> The back story of Project Renewment ®<br /> The key themes she’s seeing in Project Renewment®  groups<br /> What the different issues are that men face in this phase of life<br /> What gets in the way of freedom in retirement<br /> The pros and cons of a busy retirement<br /> What Joy has to do with retirement<br /> Her advice on how to navigate the transition from a full-time career to retirement<br /> <br /> Wise Quotes<br /> <br /> On Life Purpose and Retirement<br /> <br /> “I think that's one of the biggest challenges for retirement. Because when you're working, you don't have to think about purpose. You know exactly why you're there. You know what you're supposed to do, you know the expectations and you know the rewards. So, someone says, what is your purpose in life? As you're working 50 hours a week, you say: my purpose in life is I get to work, do my job to support my family. So now we take all of that away and said, you know, it's almost existential. You say, well, who am I now? Why am I on this planet? What is meaningful to me? And if you've never thought about that for the past 35 years or 40 years of your career. This is possibly a new thought and a new conversation. I think it is absolutely fundamental to have a meaningful purpose in retirement,  to have some sense of purpose - and it can be a journey."<br /> <br /> "Your purpose in the first five years may be a different purpose in the next five years. I think it's a journey. I think talking about it in groups, in conversation groups - even with your book group - is very helpful. I think finding purpose can be hard as a solo activity. I think it's one of the biggest challenges in retirement. You could be busy, you'd have a full calendar, but that sense of purpose may be missing - and a big piece of purpose often is giving back. That can be a very fulfilling aspect. It's a challenge. It's a process.”<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> On the Freedom of Retirement – and Life Changes<br /> <br /> “Well, I think there is this feeling, particularly if you've had a high-pressure job, if you're commuting in Los Angeles, and if you've had 12 changes in management that now you can breathe and say, Oh my God, I am finally free. I can sleep longer. I can breathe, I don't have to hyperventilate. And so, there is this great feeling of freedom and then the unexpected occurs.  The unexpected like your adult children move home for whatever reason. We have grandparents raising grandchildren. The biggest one that seems to move into this space of freedom is caregiving. So, I think what we need to prepare for it is that freedom is not 100% of everything. We may have freedom and spirit, freedom of movement, freedom of thought. But we do have responsibilities. And the biggest one that seems to come in is caregiving.”<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> On Joy and Retirement<br /> <br /> “We have a lot of environmental influences that can creep into our joy. And I love the definition of joy is the feeling of grinning inside…There are a lot of complexities of life and people go through their own struggles and yet you say, okay, this is a joyful time of your life."<br /> <br /> "Joy is not a word that is usually associated with aging and you don't usually hear joy and retirement. So, it's trying to shake that paradigm a little bit to say this has the potential to be the most joyful period of our lives. And when people are looking for joy, you're saying, all right, how do I make myself joyful?”<br /> <br />  <br /> Retirement Wisdom clean 37:00
Why Building Resilience is Vital in Midlife and Beyond – Jan Zacharjasz https://www.retirementwisdom.com/resilience-building/ Wed, 13 Nov 2019 15:26:39 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=12967 In this episode of our retirement podcast we with talk with Jan Zacharjasz. Jan is a Certified Professional Coach specializing in midlife transitions, including making a midlife career change, focusing on the changing needs of Baby Boomers as they redefine aging today. Jan shares with us her insights and perspective on a range of topics: Her story of what led her to become a coach The key challenges she sees clients dealing with in mid-life and beyond Why resilience building is vital – and whether it’s something you’re born with or can be learned How she helps clients navigate transitions Her coaching approach The benefits of coaching for her clients   Wise Quotes “I think resilience is just one of the most important things that you can have in midlife. I really see resilience as an antidote for managing many of the mid and later life changes that we were just talking about. It’s really an essential tool to help you navigate through the different bumps in the road that come up - and to help you not only bounce back from setbacks or disappointments or worries. But resilience done the right way really can enable you to come out of it even stronger than ever as a result of the experiences you’ve had and what you’ve learned from them.” “I really see there’s just an incredibly widespread application for resilience. In midlife. And resilience is a key life skill. And, if you think about it, nobody really taught us how to be resilient in school. So that’s why I build resilience into my coaching and I actually teach it in workshops.”   Bio   Jan Zacharjasz is a Certified Professional Coach specializing in midlife transitions, focusing on the changing needs of Baby Boomers as they redefine aging today.  The founder of Coaching for Resilience, Jan is passionate about helping people gain courage and resilience through significant work, health, and family changes so they can reframe their lives and thrive moving forward.  Along with individual coaching, Jan provides life purpose and energy leadership assessments and interactive workshops on resilience, retirement lifestyle planning, and how to manage change successfully. Jan’s career spans the private and public sectors in healthcare.  Most recently, she directed an award-winning program designed to cultivate positive aging in those who are 55+.  This innovative program focused on health and wellness, social connectivity, and strategies for creating a fulfilling retirement. Jan received her coaching certification from iPEC, the leading Coach Training program in the U.S.  She earned her M.S. in Human Organization Science from Villanova University and her B.S. in Individual and Family Studies from The Pennsylvania State University, where she graduated as valedictorian. An active community leader, Jan is co-chair for the Philadelphia chapter of the Life Planning Network and serves on its National Board.  She developed the Sandwich Generation Series to provide life-changing support to Boomers in caregiving roles for their aging parents and children. Jan has effectively responded to her family’s unexpected life changes and brings deep sensitivity, resourcefulness, and diligence to her coaching clients.  A proud member of the Sandwich Generation, Jan provides endless love and devotion to her husband, Mario, two daughters, and mother.  She loves traveling, exercising, and relaxing with family and friends at the beach.    Jan has recently become affiliated with Retirement Wisdom. If you’d like to work with Jan, please email Joe Casey at joec@retirementwisdom.com or call Joe at (609) 921-1521.   Related Retirement Wisdom Podcast episodes We’re All Ageing. Are You Up for a. Bolder Approach? – Carl Honore Your Retirement Won’t Come with a Road Map – Carol Hymowitz The Unique Challenges Men & Women Face in Retirement - Thelma Reese   Like this Retirement Podcast episode?  We’d appreciate it if you take a moment to leave a rat... In this episode of our retirement podcast we with talk with Jan Zacharjasz. Jan is a Certified Professional Coach specializing in midlife transitions, including making a midlife career change, focusing on the changing needs of Baby Boomers as they redefine aging today. Jan shares with us her insights and perspective on a range of topics:

  • Her story of what led her to become a coach
  • The key challenges she sees clients dealing with in mid-life and beyond
  • Why resilience building is vital – and whether it’s something you’re born with or can be learned
  • How she helps clients navigate transitions
  • Her coaching approach
  • The benefits of coaching for her clients

 

Wise Quotes

“I think resilience is just one of the most important things that you can have in midlife. I really see resilience as an antidote for managing many of the mid and later life changes that we were just talking about. It’s really an essential tool to help you navigate through the different bumps in the road that come up – and to help you not only bounce back from setbacks or disappointments or worries. But resilience done the right way really can enable you to come out of it even stronger than ever as a result of the experiences you’ve had and what you’ve learned from them.”

“I really see there’s just an incredibly widespread application for resilience. In midlife. And resilience is a key life skill. And, if you think about it, nobody really taught us how to be resilient in school. So that’s why I build resilience into my coaching and I actually teach it in workshops.”

 

Bio

 

Jan Zacharjasz is a Certified Professional Coach specializing in midlife transitions, focusing on the changing needs of Baby Boomers as they redefine aging today.  The founder of Coaching for Resilience, Jan is passionate about helping people gain courage and resilience through significant work, health, and family changes so they can reframe their lives and thrive moving forward.  Along with individual coaching, Jan provides life purpose and energy leadership assessments and interactive workshops on resilience, retirement lifestyle planning, and how to manage change successfully.

Jan’s career spans the private and public sectors in healthcare.  Most recently, she directed an award-winning program designed to cultivate positive aging in those who are 55+.  This innovative program focused on health and wellness, social connectivity, and strategies for creating a fulfilling retirement.

Jan received her coaching certification from iPEC, the leading Coach Training program in the U.S.  She earned her M.S. in Human Organization Science from Villanova University and her B.S. in Individual and Family Studies from The Pennsylvania State University, where she graduated as valedictorian.

An active community leader, Jan is co-chair for the Philadelphia chapter of the Life Planning Network and serves on its National Board.  She developed the Sandwich Generation Series to provide life-changing support to Boomers in caregiving roles for their aging parents and children.

Jan has effectively responded to her family’s unexpected life changes and brings deep sensitivity, resourcefulness, and diligence to her coaching clients.  A proud member of the Sandwich Generation, Jan provides endless love and devotion to her husband, Mario, two daughters, and mother.  She loves traveling, exercising, and relaxing with family and friends at the beach.

  

Jan has recently become affiliated with Retirement Wisdom. If you’d like to work with Jan, please email Joe Casey at joec@retirementwisdom.com or call Joe at (609) 921-1521.

 

Related Retirement Wisdom Podcast episodes

We’re All Ageing. Are You Up for a. Bolder Approach? – Carl Honore

Your Retirement Won’t Come with a Road Map – Carol Hymowitz

The Unique Challenges Men & Women Face in Retirement – Thelma Reese


 

Like this Retirement Podcast episode?  We’d appreciate it if you take a moment to leave a rating and a review on Apple Podcasts.

 

Related Article

How to Build Resilience in Midlife

The New York Times

 

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In this episode of our retirement podcast we with talk with Jan Zacharjasz. Jan is a Certified Professional Coach specializing in midlife transitions, including making a midlife career change, focusing on the changing needs of Baby Boomers as they rede... In this episode of our retirement podcast we with talk with Jan Zacharjasz. Jan is a Certified Professional Coach specializing in midlife transitions, including making a midlife career change, focusing on the changing needs of Baby Boomers as they redefine aging today. Jan shares with us her insights and perspective on a range of topics:<br /> <br /> Her story of what led her to become a coach<br /> The key challenges she sees clients dealing with in mid-life and beyond<br /> Why resilience building is vital – and whether it’s something you’re born with or can be learned<br /> How she helps clients navigate transitions<br /> Her coaching approach<br /> The benefits of coaching for her clients<br /> <br />  <br /> Wise Quotes<br /> “I think resilience is just one of the most important things that you can have in midlife. I really see resilience as an antidote for managing many of the mid and later life changes that we were just talking about. It’s really an essential tool to help you navigate through the different bumps in the road that come up - and to help you not only bounce back from setbacks or disappointments or worries. But resilience done the right way really can enable you to come out of it even stronger than ever as a result of the experiences you’ve had and what you’ve learned from them.”<br /> <br /> “I really see there’s just an incredibly widespread application for resilience. In midlife. And resilience is a key life skill. And, if you think about it, nobody really taught us how to be resilient in school. So that’s why I build resilience into my coaching and I actually teach it in workshops.”<br /> <br />  <br /> Bio<br />  <br /> <br /> Jan Zacharjasz is a Certified Professional Coach specializing in midlife transitions, focusing on the changing needs of Baby Boomers as they redefine aging today.  The founder of Coaching for Resilience, Jan is passionate about helping people gain courage and resilience through significant work, health, and family changes so they can reframe their lives and thrive moving forward.  Along with individual coaching, Jan provides life purpose and energy leadership assessments and interactive workshops on resilience, retirement lifestyle planning, and how to manage change successfully.<br /> <br /> Jan’s career spans the private and public sectors in healthcare.  Most recently, she directed an award-winning program designed to cultivate positive aging in those who are 55+.  This innovative program focused on health and wellness, social connectivity, and strategies for creating a fulfilling retirement.<br /> <br /> Jan received her coaching certification from iPEC, the leading Coach Training program in the U.S.  She earned her M.S. in Human Organization Science from Villanova University and her B.S. in Individual and Family Studies from The Pennsylvania State University, where she graduated as valedictorian.<br /> <br /> An active community leader, Jan is co-chair for the Philadelphia chapter of the Life Planning Network and serves on its National Board.  She developed the Sandwich Generation Series to provide life-changing support to Boomers in caregiving roles for their aging parents and children.<br /> <br /> Jan has effectively responded to her family’s unexpected life changes and brings deep sensitivity, resourcefulness, and diligence to her coaching clients.  A proud member of the Sandwich Generation, Jan provides endless love and devotion to her husband, Mario, two daughters, and mother.  She loves traveling, exercising, and relaxing with family and friends at the beach.<br /> <br />   <br /> <br /> Jan has recently become affiliated with Retirement Wisdom. If you’d like to work with Jan, please email Joe Casey at joec@retirementwisdom.com or call Joe at (609) 921-1521.<br /> <br />  <br /> Related Retirement Wisdom Podcast episodes<br /> We’re All Ageing. Are You Up for a. Bolder Approach? – Carl Honore<br /> <br /> Retirement Wisdom clean 26:26
Why People Make a Career Change with Purpose Top of Mind – Chris Farrell https://www.retirementwisdom.com/career-change-with-purpose/ Tue, 22 Oct 2019 18:16:49 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=12658 In this new episode of our retirement podcast, we are joined by Chris Farrell to discuss his new book Purpose and a Paycheck. Podcasts about retirement and books on retirement primarily focus on financial planning. Chris' new book is different. In our conversation, he shares his observations on why more people are making a career change toward work with greater purpose and meaning. Chris explains why he thinks “There has never been a better time to be in the second half of life in America” and offers his insights on why the choice of working in retirement can be beneficial. We also discuss why he thinks entrepreneurship and self-employment are attractive options for a midlife career change and the multigenerational dimensions of retirement today. You’ll also hear the ageist phrases that he thinks should be retired, and his advice for planning your next chapter with purpose top of mind. If you’re thinking about a career change at 50 or older, you’ll benefit from listening to this conversation. It just might just give you inspiring ideas for a second career after retirement with greater purpose. Wise Quotes On Innovative Ways of Working Longer “…At our core we all want to be useful, we all want to be helpful. And one way that we're useful and helpful is to tap into our knowledge and our experience. So, there's a lot of experimentation that's going on right now. Flexible work, part-time work, starting your own business, self-employment, phased retirement, encore careers. And we don't really know how this is going to shake out.” On Emerging Multigenerational Trends “A lot of people don't like age segregation anymore. …it's the Boomer parents going into business with their Millennial or Gen-X or children. Or it's a boomer going into business with a Millennial or a Gen-Xer. Typically, what the Boomer’s providing is some capital, knowledge, experience and contacts. And what the younger person is providing is that ambition, that hustle, a little tech-savvy - and their burden of student loans. So, they don't have that much capital. And so, that's a real win-win situation for both generations. And that's a really heartening trend.” “The other place where you're seeing it is in housing. There's a great deal of interest in intergenerational housing. (There’s) not a whole lot of choice out there yet. We can come up, there are lots of, intriguing examples of music conservatories that are nearby a continuing care community and the students are invited to live there for free, or a nominal price, and just to be part of the community to be engaged with the community. And you are seeing a sort of deliberate building of multigenerational communities.” Bio Chris Farrell is considered a leading expert on the trend toward working longer in the second half of life. He writes a biweekly column for Next Avenue, an online PBS magazine for the 50-plus demographic, and hosts a Minnesota Public Radio Program, Conversations on the Creative Economy, which is now entering its sixth season. He speaks across the country on the topic of unretirement. Chris earned his BA from Stanford and his Master’s from the London School of Economics. Books by Chris Farrell Referenced in this Retirement Podcast episode: Purpose and a Paycheck: Finding Meaning, Money & Happiness in the Second Half of Life Unretirement: How Baby Boomers are Changing the Way We Think About Work, Community, and the Good Life   Follow Chris Farrell: Conversations on the Creative Economy - MPR News Next Avenue Twitter   Our Brief Review of Purpose and a Paycheck   Related Retirement Podcast Episodes: If You’re Planning on Working Longer, How Do You Best Prepare – Kerry Hannon Will You Be an Entrepreneur in Your Second Act Career? – Dorie Clark   Related Post: Why Settle for Happiness?    Tools You Can Use Tap into free retirement tools you can use, including a quiz on retirement readiness on the non-financial side, In this new episode of our retirement podcast, we are joined by Chris Farrell to discuss his new book Purpose and a Paycheck. Podcasts about retirement and books on retirement primarily focus on financial planning. Chris’ new book is different. In our conversation, he shares his observations on why more people are making a career change toward work with greater purpose and meaning. Chris explains why he thinks “There has never been a better time to be in the second half of life in America” and offers his insights on why the choice of working in retirement can be beneficial. We also discuss why he thinks entrepreneurship and self-employment are attractive options for a midlife career change and the multigenerational dimensions of retirement today. You’ll also hear the ageist phrases that he thinks should be retired, and his advice for planning your next chapter with purpose top of mind. If you’re thinking about a career change at 50 or older, you’ll benefit from listening to this conversation. It just might just give you inspiring ideas for a second career after retirement with greater purpose.

Wise Quotes

On Innovative Ways of Working Longer

“…At our core we all want to be useful, we all want to be helpful. And one way that we’re useful and helpful is to tap into our knowledge and our experience. So, there’s a lot of experimentation that’s going on right now. Flexible work, part-time work, starting your own business, self-employment, phased retirement, encore careers. And we don’t really know how this is going to shake out.”

On Emerging Multigenerational Trends

“A lot of people don’t like age segregation anymore. …it’s the Boomer parents going into business with their Millennial or Gen-X or children. Or it’s a boomer going into business with a Millennial or a Gen-Xer. Typically, what the Boomer’s providing is some capital, knowledge, experience and contacts. And what the younger person is providing is that ambition, that hustle, a little tech-savvy – and their burden of student loans. So, they don’t have that much capital. And so, that’s a real win-win situation for both generations. And that’s a really heartening trend.”

“The other place where you’re seeing it is in housing. There’s a great deal of interest in intergenerational housing. (There’s) not a whole lot of choice out there yet. We can come up, there are lots of, intriguing examples of music conservatories that are nearby a continuing care community and the students are invited to live there for free, or a nominal price, and just to be part of the community to be engaged with the community. And you are seeing a sort of deliberate building of multigenerational communities.”

Bio

Chris Farrell is considered a leading expert on the trend toward working longer in the second half of life. He writes a biweekly column for Next Avenue, an online PBS magazine for the 50-plus demographic, and hosts a Minnesota Public Radio Program, Conversations on the Creative Economy, which is now entering its sixth season. He speaks across the country on the topic of unretirement. Chris earned his BA from Stanford and his Master’s from the London School of Economics.

Books by Chris Farrell Referenced in this Retirement Podcast episode:

Purpose and a Paycheck: Finding Meaning, Money & Happiness in the Second Half of Life

Unretirement: How Baby Boomers are Changing the Way We Think About Work, Community, and the Good Life

 

Follow Chris Farrell:

Conversations on the Creative Economy – MPR News
Next Avenue
Twitter

 

Our Brief Review of Purpose and a Paycheck

 

Related Retirement Podcast Episodes:

If You’re Planning on Working Longer, How Do You Best Prepare – Kerry Hannon

Will You Be an Entrepreneur in Your Second Act Career? – Dorie Clark

 

Related Post:

Why Settle for Happiness? 

 

Tools You Can Use

Tap into free retirement tools you can use, including a quiz on retirement readiness on the non-financial side, retirement calculators, a longevity calculator and a free e-book at retirementwisdom.com

 


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In this new episode of our retirement podcast, we are joined by Chris Farrell to discuss his new book Purpose and a Paycheck. Podcasts about retirement and books on retirement primarily focus on financial planning. Chris' new book is different. In this new episode of our retirement podcast, we are joined by Chris Farrell to discuss his new book Purpose and a Paycheck. Podcasts about retirement and books on retirement primarily focus on financial planning. Chris' new book is different. In our conversation, he shares his observations on why more people are making a career change toward work with greater purpose and meaning. Chris explains why he thinks “There has never been a better time to be in the second half of life in America” and offers his insights on why the choice of working in retirement can be beneficial. We also discuss why he thinks entrepreneurship and self-employment are attractive options for a midlife career change and the multigenerational dimensions of retirement today. You’ll also hear the ageist phrases that he thinks should be retired, and his advice for planning your next chapter with purpose top of mind. If you’re thinking about a career change at 50 or older, you’ll benefit from listening to this conversation. It just might just give you inspiring ideas for a second career after retirement with greater purpose.<br /> <br /> Wise Quotes<br /> <br /> On Innovative Ways of Working Longer<br /> <br /> “…At our core we all want to be useful, we all want to be helpful. And one way that we're useful and helpful is to tap into our knowledge and our experience. So, there's a lot of experimentation that's going on right now. Flexible work, part-time work, starting your own business, self-employment, phased retirement, encore careers. And we don't really know how this is going to shake out.”<br /> <br /> On Emerging Multigenerational Trends<br /> <br /> “A lot of people don't like age segregation anymore. …it's the Boomer parents going into business with their Millennial or Gen-X or children. Or it's a boomer going into business with a Millennial or a Gen-Xer. Typically, what the Boomer’s providing is some capital, knowledge, experience and contacts. And what the younger person is providing is that ambition, that hustle, a little tech-savvy - and their burden of student loans. So, they don't have that much capital. And so, that's a real win-win situation for both generations. And that's a really heartening trend.”<br /> <br /> “The other place where you're seeing it is in housing. There's a great deal of interest in intergenerational housing. (There’s) not a whole lot of choice out there yet. We can come up, there are lots of, intriguing examples of music conservatories that are nearby a continuing care community and the students are invited to live there for free, or a nominal price, and just to be part of the community to be engaged with the community. And you are seeing a sort of deliberate building of multigenerational communities.”<br /> <br /> Bio<br /> <br /> Chris Farrell is considered a leading expert on the trend toward working longer in the second half of life. He writes a biweekly column for Next Avenue, an online PBS magazine for the 50-plus demographic, and hosts a Minnesota Public Radio Program, Conversations on the Creative Economy, which is now entering its sixth season. He speaks across the country on the topic of unretirement. Chris earned his BA from Stanford and his Master’s from the London School of Economics.<br /> <br /> Books by Chris Farrell Referenced in this Retirement Podcast episode:<br /> <br /> Purpose and a Paycheck: Finding Meaning, Money & Happiness in the Second Half of Life<br /> <br /> Unretirement: How Baby Boomers are Changing the Way We Think About Work, Community, and the Good Life<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Follow Chris Farrell:<br /> <br /> Conversations on the Creative Economy - MPR News<br /> Next Avenue<br /> Twitter<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Our Brief Review of Purpose and a Paycheck<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Related Retirement Podcast Episodes:<br /> <br /> If You’re Planning on Working Longer, How Do You Best Prepare – Kerry Hannon<br /> <br /> Retirement Wisdom clean 28:31
Do Your Retirement Strategies Account for 6 Stages & Community? – Ted Carr https://www.retirementwisdom.com/6-stages-of-retirement/ Mon, 14 Oct 2019 00:19:10 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=12608 In this edition of our retirement podcast our guest is Ted Carr, a thoughtful and interesting blogger and podcaster on early retirement who we enjoy following. People often think of retirement as a single phase of life, but Ted describes how there are 6 distinct phases of retirement. He shares his personal experiences with the different phases after he retired early from a career in Silicon Valley. You’ll come away with an appreciation of why your retirement strategies should take the different phases into account if you want to retire smarter. One of the big questions people face in retirement is where should I retire to? And that decision is often not a ‘one and done’ type of call as needs, and priorities change over the life course. Ted discusses the decision that he and his wife recently made to move to a retirement community and the key factors that led to their decision. Our conversation shifts to the importance of community in retirement and the risks of isolation. Follow Ted Carr: Twitter Website Check out his new podcast: FIREwalkers   Wise Quotes: On Retirement as a Stressful Life Event “So, I think back to the time before I retired - the pre-retirement stage. What I found is that it's really, really essential that you have a detailed retirement plan and that it includes not only a financial plan, but also the non-financial side of retirement. And as we've alluded to already, the adjustment to retirement can be difficult. Now there's something that I've come across, I'm sure you've heard of it too. It's called the Holmes and Rahe Stress Scale. And on that stress scale, retirement comes in as the 10th most stressful event on that scale. Now, if that wasn't stressful enough, the other stressors that are on the top 10, shall we say, can occur at the same time as retirement - which only exacerbates the challenges around adjusting to retirement - and some of those things where you have divorce, separation, illness, loss of jobs.”   On Planning to Move in Retirement “So, us being inveterate planners said, well, you know, we need to be intentional about our future old age. And so, we looked at some of these options and after looking at the CCRC model, we decided that that probably wasn't for us...And we're not near that age and the entering cost of buying into a CCRC is very expensive. And so, we just said there are other options that are coming down the road. Maybe we should take a timeout from thinking that way and look at something different. So my wife, who's extremely social, came up with the idea to look into a 55 plus community because her feeling, and I concur, is that where we live today, there's really not a sense of belonging. Like I say, she just doesn't feel that she's made enough friends over the course of nine years and she doesn't want to see the next nine to 10 years be equally as frustrating. So, we started looking at 55 plus communities.”   Resources Mentioned on this Retirement Podcast Episode: The Holmes & Rahe Stress Inventory What’s Your Retirement Personality Type?   by Dave Hughes   Related Retirement Podcast Episodes:   You Can Learn a Lot From the Principles of FIRE - Chris Mamula Are You Ready to Follow Your Own Path in Retirement? – Bob Lowry     Tools You Can Use Tap into free retirement tools you can use, including a quiz on retirement readiness on the non-financial side, retirement calculators, a longevity calculator and a free e-book at retirementwisdom.com Stay in the Loop with Wisdom You Can Apply to Your Retirement Planning Subscribe to our Free Monthly Newsletter Wisdom Notes   In this edition of our retirement podcast our guest is Ted Carr, a thoughtful and interesting blogger and podcaster on early retirement who we enjoy following. People often think of retirement as a single phase of life, but Ted describes how there are 6 distinct phases of retirement. He shares his personal experiences with the different phases after he retired early from a career in Silicon Valley. You’ll come away with an appreciation of why your retirement strategies should take the different phases into account if you want to retire smarter.

One of the big questions people face in retirement is where should I retire to? And that decision is often not a ‘one and done’ type of call as needs, and priorities change over the life course. Ted discusses the decision that he and his wife recently made to move to a retirement community and the key factors that led to their decision. Our conversation shifts to the importance of community in retirement and the risks of isolation.

Follow Ted Carr:

Twitter

Website

Check out his new podcast:

FIREwalkers

 

Wise Quotes:

On Retirement as a Stressful Life Event

“So, I think back to the time before I retired – the pre-retirement stage. What I found is that it’s really, really essential that you have a detailed retirement plan and that it includes not only a financial plan, but also the non-financial side of retirement. And as we’ve alluded to already, the adjustment to retirement can be difficult. Now there’s something that I’ve come across, I’m sure you’ve heard of it too. It’s called the Holmes and Rahe Stress Scale. And on that stress scale, retirement comes in as the 10th most stressful event on that scale. Now, if that wasn’t stressful enough, the other stressors that are on the top 10, shall we say, can occur at the same time as retirement – which only exacerbates the challenges around adjusting to retirement – and some of those things where you have divorce, separation, illness, loss of jobs.”

 

On Planning to Move in Retirement

“So, us being inveterate planners said, well, you know, we need to be intentional about our future old age. And so, we looked at some of these options and after looking at the CCRC model, we decided that that probably wasn’t for us…And we’re not near that age and the entering cost of buying into a CCRC is very expensive. And so, we just said there are other options that are coming down the road. Maybe we should take a timeout from thinking that way and look at something different. So my wife, who’s extremely social, came up with the idea to look into a 55 plus community because her feeling, and I concur, is that where we live today, there’s really not a sense of belonging. Like I say, she just doesn’t feel that she’s made enough friends over the course of nine years and she doesn’t want to see the next nine to 10 years be equally as frustrating. So, we started looking at 55 plus communities.”

 

Resources Mentioned on this Retirement Podcast Episode:

The Holmes & Rahe Stress Inventory

What’s Your Retirement Personality Type?   by Dave Hughes

 

Related Retirement Podcast Episodes:

 

You Can Learn a Lot From the Principles of FIRE – Chris Mamula

Are You Ready to Follow Your Own Path in Retirement? – Bob Lowry

 

 

Tools You Can Use

Tap into free retirement tools you can use, including a quiz on retirement readiness on the non-financial side, retirement calculators, a longevity calculator and a free e-book at retirementwisdom.com


Stay in the Loop with Wisdom You Can Apply to Your Retirement Planning

Subscribe to our Free Monthly Newsletter Wisdom Notes

 

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In this edition of our retirement podcast our guest is Ted Carr, a thoughtful and interesting blogger and podcaster on early retirement who we enjoy following. People often think of retirement as a single phase of life, In this edition of our retirement podcast our guest is Ted Carr, a thoughtful and interesting blogger and podcaster on early retirement who we enjoy following. People often think of retirement as a single phase of life, but Ted describes how there are 6 distinct phases of retirement. He shares his personal experiences with the different phases after he retired early from a career in Silicon Valley. You’ll come away with an appreciation of why your retirement strategies should take the different phases into account if you want to retire smarter.<br /> <br /> One of the big questions people face in retirement is where should I retire to? And that decision is often not a ‘one and done’ type of call as needs, and priorities change over the life course. Ted discusses the decision that he and his wife recently made to move to a retirement community and the key factors that led to their decision. Our conversation shifts to the importance of community in retirement and the risks of isolation.<br /> <br /> Follow Ted Carr:<br /> <br /> Twitter<br /> <br /> Website<br /> <br /> Check out his new podcast:<br /> <br /> FIREwalkers<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Wise Quotes:<br /> <br /> On Retirement as a Stressful Life Event<br /> <br /> “So, I think back to the time before I retired - the pre-retirement stage. What I found is that it's really, really essential that you have a detailed retirement plan and that it includes not only a financial plan, but also the non-financial side of retirement. And as we've alluded to already, the adjustment to retirement can be difficult. Now there's something that I've come across, I'm sure you've heard of it too. It's called the Holmes and Rahe Stress Scale. And on that stress scale, retirement comes in as the 10th most stressful event on that scale. Now, if that wasn't stressful enough, the other stressors that are on the top 10, shall we say, can occur at the same time as retirement - which only exacerbates the challenges around adjusting to retirement - and some of those things where you have divorce, separation, illness, loss of jobs.”<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> On Planning to Move in Retirement<br /> <br /> “So, us being inveterate planners said, well, you know, we need to be intentional about our future old age. And so, we looked at some of these options and after looking at the CCRC model, we decided that that probably wasn't for us...And we're not near that age and the entering cost of buying into a CCRC is very expensive. And so, we just said there are other options that are coming down the road. Maybe we should take a timeout from thinking that way and look at something different. So my wife, who's extremely social, came up with the idea to look into a 55 plus community because her feeling, and I concur, is that where we live today, there's really not a sense of belonging. Like I say, she just doesn't feel that she's made enough friends over the course of nine years and she doesn't want to see the next nine to 10 years be equally as frustrating. So, we started looking at 55 plus communities.”<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Resources Mentioned on this Retirement Podcast Episode:<br /> <br /> The Holmes & Rahe Stress Inventory<br /> <br /> What’s Your Retirement Personality Type?   by Dave Hughes<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Related Retirement Podcast Episodes:<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> You Can Learn a Lot From the Principles of FIRE - Chris Mamula<br /> <br /> Are You Ready to Follow Your Own Path in Retirement? – Bob Lowry<br /> <br />  <br /> <br />  <br /> Tools You Can Use<br /> Tap into free retirement tools you can use, including a quiz on retirement readiness on the non-financial side, retirement calculators, a longevity calculator and a free e-book at retirementwisdom.com<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Stay in the Loop with Wisdom You Can Apply to Your Retirement Planning<br /> <br /> Subscribe to our Free Monthly Newsletter Wisdom No... Retirement Wisdom clean 37:37
Is Working Into Retirement Good for Your Brain? – Dawn Carr https://www.retirementwisdom.com/working-into-retirement/ Sun, 06 Oct 2019 01:53:28 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=12567 We all want to stay sharp. Cognitive functioning is a key part of healthy aging. But is working longer helpful or harmful to your brain health? Well, it depends. In this episode of our retirement podcast, Dawn Carr of Florida State University discusses her insights from new research on the impact of working into retirement with different types of jobs. She also talks about what may happen when people unretire and return to work. Dawn also shares her advice on aging well and how to stay sharp based on research. Bio Dawn C. Carr is an associate professor at Florida State University in the Department of Sociology and faculty associate at Pepper Institute for Aging and Public Policy. Carr’s expertise lies in understanding the factors that bolster older adults’ ability to remain healthy and active as long as possible. With Kathrin Komp, Carr published “Gerontology in the Era of the Third Age: Implications and Next Steps” in 2011, a text dedicated to exploring the relevance, purpose, and factors that contributed to the emergence of a new period of life following one’s career but prior to onset of frailty in later life. Her recent work focuses on understanding the complex pathways between health and active engagement during later life, including the impact of key transitions in health, productivity, and caregiving. Before joining Florida State University in 2016, she was a researcher at the Stanford Center on Longevity, a postdoctoral fellow in the Carolina Program for Health and Aging Research at the Institute on Aging at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a researcher at Scripps Gerontology Center. Carr received her Ph.D. in Social Gerontology and Master’s in Gerontological Studies at Miami University, and Bachelor of Arts in Music Performance at Arizona State University.   Website Dawn Carr's Website   Wise Quote On Staying Sharp “What we know is that there are three really important ingredients for maintaining cognitive function, not just in later life but across our lives. And one is staying physically active.… The blood flow in our brains is affected by physical activity and we know that this has a beneficial effect on cognitive function. And the more regularly we stay engaged in physical activity and avoid sedentary behavior, this seems to be very beneficial. So, you don't think about staying mentally sharp by exercising, but there's a certain amount of evidence that suggests that just continuing to stay physically active matters. The second...surprising thing that we know in research about maintaining cognitive function is the importance of social interactions. People who have very active social lives are able to keep their cognitive function longer. So, they're able to not only arrive in later life with higher levels of cognitive function, but they also seem to maintain it longer if they continue to stay socially active.”   Articles Referenced Brains age better among retirees with complex jobs - Florida State University Carr, D. C., Willis, R., Kail, B. L., & Carstensen, L. L. (2019). Alternative Retirement Paths and Cognitive Performance: Exploring the Role of Preretirement Job Complexity. The Gerontologist. Sims, T., Reed, A. E., & Carr, D. C. (2017). Information and communication technology use is related to higher well-being among the oldest-old. The Journals of Gerontology: Series B, 72(5), 761-770.   Related Retirement Podcast How Can You Be Better with Age?   Tools You Can Use Tap into free retirement tools you can use, including a quiz on retirement readiness on the non-financial side, retirement calculators, a longevity calculator and a free e-book at retirementwisdom.com We all want to stay sharp. Cognitive functioning is a key part of healthy aging. But is working longer helpful or harmful to your brain health? Well, it depends. In this episode of our retirement podcast, Dawn Carr of Florida State University discusses her insights from new research on the impact of working into retirement with different types of jobs. She also talks about what may happen when people unretire and return to work. Dawn also shares her advice on aging well and how to stay sharp based on research.

Bio

Dawn C. Carr is an associate professor at Florida State University in the Department of Sociology and faculty associate at Pepper Institute for Aging and Public Policy. Carr’s expertise lies in understanding the factors that bolster older adults’ ability to remain healthy and active as long as possible. With Kathrin Komp, Carr published “Gerontology in the Era of the Third Age: Implications and Next Steps” in 2011, a text dedicated to exploring the relevance, purpose, and factors that contributed to the emergence of a new period of life following one’s career but prior to onset of frailty in later life.

Her recent work focuses on understanding the complex pathways between health and active engagement during later life, including the impact of key transitions in health, productivity, and caregiving. Before joining Florida State University in 2016, she was a researcher at the Stanford Center on Longevity, a postdoctoral fellow in the Carolina Program for Health and Aging Research at the Institute on Aging at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a researcher at Scripps Gerontology Center.

Carr received her Ph.D. in Social Gerontology and Master’s in Gerontological Studies at Miami University, and Bachelor of Arts in Music Performance at Arizona State University.

 

Website

Dawn Carr’s Website

 

Wise Quote

On Staying Sharp

“What we know is that there are three really important ingredients for maintaining cognitive function, not just in later life but across our lives. And one is staying physically active.… The blood flow in our brains is affected by physical activity and we know that this has a beneficial effect on cognitive function. And the more regularly we stay engaged in physical activity and avoid sedentary behavior, this seems to be very beneficial.

So, you don’t think about staying mentally sharp by exercising, but there’s a certain amount of evidence that suggests that just continuing to stay physically active matters. The second…surprising thing that we know in research about maintaining cognitive function is the importance of social interactions.

People who have very active social lives are able to keep their cognitive function longer. So, they’re able to not only arrive in later life with higher levels of cognitive function, but they also seem to maintain it longer if they continue to stay socially active.”

 

Articles Referenced

Brains age better among retirees with complex jobs – Florida State University

Carr, D. C., Willis, R., Kail, B. L., & Carstensen, L. L. (2019). Alternative Retirement Paths and Cognitive Performance: Exploring the Role of Preretirement Job Complexity. The Gerontologist.

Sims, T., Reed, A. E., & Carr, D. C. (2017). Information and communication technology use is related to higher well-being among the oldest-old. The Journals of Gerontology: Series B, 72(5), 761-770.

 

Related Retirement Podcast

How Can You Be Better with Age?

 

Tools You Can Use

Tap into free retirement tools you can use, including a quiz on retirement readiness on the non-financial side, retirement calculators, a longevity calculator and a free e-book at retirementwisdom.com

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We all want to stay sharp. Cognitive functioning is a key part of healthy aging. But is working longer helpful or harmful to your brain health? Well, it depends. In this episode of our retirement podcast, Dawn Carr of Florida State University discusses... We all want to stay sharp. Cognitive functioning is a key part of healthy aging. But is working longer helpful or harmful to your brain health? Well, it depends. In this episode of our retirement podcast, Dawn Carr of Florida State University discusses her insights from new research on the impact of working into retirement with different types of jobs. She also talks about what may happen when people unretire and return to work. Dawn also shares her advice on aging well and how to stay sharp based on research.<br /> Bio<br /> Dawn C. Carr is an associate professor at Florida State University in the Department of Sociology and faculty associate at Pepper Institute for Aging and Public Policy. Carr’s expertise lies in understanding the factors that bolster older adults’ ability to remain healthy and active as long as possible. With Kathrin Komp, Carr published “Gerontology in the Era of the Third Age: Implications and Next Steps” in 2011, a text dedicated to exploring the relevance, purpose, and factors that contributed to the emergence of a new period of life following one’s career but prior to onset of frailty in later life.<br /> <br /> Her recent work focuses on understanding the complex pathways between health and active engagement during later life, including the impact of key transitions in health, productivity, and caregiving. Before joining Florida State University in 2016, she was a researcher at the Stanford Center on Longevity, a postdoctoral fellow in the Carolina Program for Health and Aging Research at the Institute on Aging at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a researcher at Scripps Gerontology Center.<br /> <br /> Carr received her Ph.D. in Social Gerontology and Master’s in Gerontological Studies at Miami University, and Bachelor of Arts in Music Performance at Arizona State University.<br /> <br />  <br /> Website<br /> Dawn Carr's Website<br /> <br />  <br /> Wise Quote<br /> On Staying Sharp<br /> <br /> “What we know is that there are three really important ingredients for maintaining cognitive function, not just in later life but across our lives. And one is staying physically active.… The blood flow in our brains is affected by physical activity and we know that this has a beneficial effect on cognitive function. And the more regularly we stay engaged in physical activity and avoid sedentary behavior, this seems to be very beneficial.<br /> <br /> So, you don't think about staying mentally sharp by exercising, but there's a certain amount of evidence that suggests that just continuing to stay physically active matters. The second...surprising thing that we know in research about maintaining cognitive function is the importance of social interactions.<br /> <br /> People who have very active social lives are able to keep their cognitive function longer. So, they're able to not only arrive in later life with higher levels of cognitive function, but they also seem to maintain it longer if they continue to stay socially active.”<br /> <br />  <br /> Articles Referenced<br /> Brains age better among retirees with complex jobs - Florida State University<br /> <br /> Carr, D. C., Willis, R., Kail, B. L., & Carstensen, L. L. (2019). Alternative Retirement Paths and Cognitive Performance: Exploring the Role of Preretirement Job Complexity. The Gerontologist.<br /> <br /> Sims, T., Reed, A. E., & Carr, D. C. (2017). Information and communication technology use is related to higher well-being among the oldest-old. The Journals of Gerontology: Series B, 72(5), 761-770.<br /> <br />  <br /> Related Retirement Podcast<br /> How Can You Be Better with Age?<br /> <br />  <br /> Tools You Can Use<br /> Tap into free retirement tools you can use, including a quiz on retirement readiness on the non-financial side, retirement calculators, a longevity calculator and a free e-book at retirementwisdom.com Retirement Wisdom clean 33:14
What Can We Learn from Blue Zones? – Richard Eisenberg https://www.retirementwisdom.com/retirement-podcast-richard-eisenberg/ Wed, 14 Aug 2019 02:45:21 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=12068 Richard Eisenberg, the Managing Editor of PBS’ Nextavenue.org joins our retirement podcast . to share his insights. Next Avenue is the PBS site for people 50+, where he is also the editor of the Money and Work & Purpose channels. Previously, he was Executive Editor of Money magazine, Front Page Finance Editor of Yahoo! and Special Projects Director/Money Editor at Good Housekeeping. He is the author of two books: How to Avoid a Midlife Financial Crisis and The Money Book of Personal Finance. We talk with Richard Eisenberg about Next Avenue, older workers and employers, the key trends Baby Boomers should be aware of and what he's learned from his research on Blue Zones. Wise Quote: Q. What's the one thing that people who are planning for retirement may not be thinking about but really should be? Richard Eisenberg: "If it's okay, I think I'll give you two. One of them is will I be able to keep working part time if I want to. There've been some interesting studies that show a lot of people in their fifties and sixties expect to work part-time in retirement. And yet when you look at the surveys of retirees, you find that a very small percentage of them are working in retirement and many of them aren't because of health reasons. So I think people just need to think, well, is it realistic that I'll be able to work in retirement? Partly, you know what, I'd be healthy enough to do it, but also will I be able to find work? Will I be able to get hired or will I be able to start a business? So I think that's one thing I would tell people to think about. And the other is if you are in a long-term relationship and have a spouse or partner are the two of you on the same page about retirement? We've done a few articles on Next Avenue about couples and retirement and have seen some studies that show that frequently couples don't talk with each other much about what they expect retirement to be like for them. How they plan to spend their time and their money. And then what happens is they get retired and then one of them is planning to travel a lot and the other is not planning to travel at all?  And they don't want to be living differently, but they hadn't really thought it out because they never had to. So I'd suggest couples talk about this more."   Bio: Richard Eisenberg is Managing Editor of PBS’ Nextavenue.org, the PBS site for people 50+, where he is also the editor of the Money and Work & Purpose channels.   Previously, he was Executive Editor of Money magazine, Front Page Finance Editor of Yahoo! and Special Projects Director/Money Editor at Good Housekeeping.   He is author of two books: How to Avoid a Midlife Financial Crisis and The Money Book of Personal Finance. How can you apply lessons from The Blue Zones? Listen in on our conversation with Richard Eisenberg of Next AvenueClick To Tweet ___________________________________________________________________________   For more on Richard Eisenberg: Read his Series on Blue Zones mentioned in this podcast Follow Richard Eisenberg on Twitter   More Retirement Podcast Episodes    Related Book Review You May Like: IKIGAI: The Japanese Secret to a Long and Happy Life Free Tools Tap into access to free tools on our website to assist with your retirement planning, including retirement calculators, a longevity calculator and an Am I Ready to Retire? quiz at retirementwisdom.com   _____________________________________________________________________________ Stay in the Loop Sign up for our monthly newsletter Wisdom Notes. Richard Eisenberg, the Managing Editor of PBS’ Nextavenue.org joins our retirement podcast . to share his insights. Next Avenue is the PBS site for people 50+, where he is also the editor of the Money and Work & Purpose channels.

Previously, he was Executive Editor of Money magazine, Front Page Finance Editor of Yahoo! and Special Projects Director/Money Editor at Good Housekeeping. He is the author of two books: How to Avoid a Midlife Financial Crisis and The Money Book of Personal Finance.

We talk with Richard Eisenberg about Next Avenue, older workers and employers, the key trends Baby Boomers should be aware of and what he’s learned from his research on Blue Zones.

Wise Quote:

Q. What’s the one thing that people who are planning for retirement may not be thinking about but really should be?

Richard Eisenberg: “If it’s okay, I think I’ll give you two. One of them is will I be able to keep working part time if I want to. There’ve been some interesting studies that show a lot of people in their fifties and sixties expect to work part-time in retirement. And yet when you look at the surveys of retirees, you find that a very small percentage of them are working in retirement and many of them aren’t because of health reasons. So I think people just need to think, well, is it realistic that I’ll be able to work in retirement? Partly, you know what, I’d be healthy enough to do it, but also will I be able to find work? Will I be able to get hired or will I be able to start a business? So I think that’s one thing I would tell people to think about.

And the other is if you are in a long-term relationship and have a spouse or partner are the two of you on the same page about retirement? We’ve done a few articles on Next Avenue about couples and retirement and have seen some studies that show that frequently couples don’t talk with each other much about what they expect retirement to be like for them. How they plan to spend their time and their money. And then what happens is they get retired and then one of them is planning to travel a lot and the other is not planning to travel at all?  And they don’t want to be living differently, but they hadn’t really thought it out because they never had to. So I’d suggest couples talk about this more.”

 

Bio:

Richard Eisenberg is Managing Editor of PBS’ Nextavenue.org, the PBS site for people 50+, where he is also the editor of the Money and Work & Purpose channels.

 

Previously, he was Executive Editor of Money magazine, Front Page Finance Editor of Yahoo! and Special Projects Director/Money Editor at Good Housekeeping.

 

He is author of two books: How to Avoid a Midlife Financial Crisis and The Money Book of Personal Finance.


How can you apply lessons from The Blue Zones? Listen in on our conversation with Richard Eisenberg of Next Avenue
Click To Tweet


___________________________________________________________________________

 

For more on Richard Eisenberg:

Read his Series on Blue Zones mentioned in this podcast

Follow Richard Eisenberg on Twitter

 

More Retirement Podcast Episodes 

 

Related Book Review You May Like:

IKIGAI: The Japanese Secret to a Long and Happy Life

Free Tools

Tap into access to free tools on our website to assist with your retirement planning, including retirement calculators, a longevity calculator and an Am I Ready to Retire? quiz at retirementwisdom.com

 

_____________________________________________________________________________

Stay in the Loop

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Richard Eisenberg, the Managing Editor of PBS’ Nextavenue.org joins our retirement podcast . to share his insights. Next Avenue is the PBS site for people 50+, where he is also the editor of the Money and Work & Purpose channels. - Previously, Richard Eisenberg, the Managing Editor of PBS’ Nextavenue.org joins our retirement podcast . to share his insights. Next Avenue is the PBS site for people 50+, where he is also the editor of the Money and Work & Purpose channels.<br /> <br /> Previously, he was Executive Editor of Money magazine, Front Page Finance Editor of Yahoo! and Special Projects Director/Money Editor at Good Housekeeping. He is the author of two books: How to Avoid a Midlife Financial Crisis and The Money Book of Personal Finance.<br /> <br /> We talk with Richard Eisenberg about Next Avenue, older workers and employers, the key trends Baby Boomers should be aware of and what he's learned from his research on Blue Zones.<br /> Wise Quote:<br /> Q. What's the one thing that people who are planning for retirement may not be thinking about but really should be?<br /> <br /> Richard Eisenberg: "If it's okay, I think I'll give you two. One of them is will I be able to keep working part time if I want to. There've been some interesting studies that show a lot of people in their fifties and sixties expect to work part-time in retirement. And yet when you look at the surveys of retirees, you find that a very small percentage of them are working in retirement and many of them aren't because of health reasons. So I think people just need to think, well, is it realistic that I'll be able to work in retirement? Partly, you know what, I'd be healthy enough to do it, but also will I be able to find work? Will I be able to get hired or will I be able to start a business? So I think that's one thing I would tell people to think about.<br /> <br /> And the other is if you are in a long-term relationship and have a spouse or partner are the two of you on the same page about retirement? We've done a few articles on Next Avenue about couples and retirement and have seen some studies that show that frequently couples don't talk with each other much about what they expect retirement to be like for them. How they plan to spend their time and their money. And then what happens is they get retired and then one of them is planning to travel a lot and the other is not planning to travel at all?  And they don't want to be living differently, but they hadn't really thought it out because they never had to. So I'd suggest couples talk about this more."<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Bio:<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Richard Eisenberg is Managing Editor of PBS’ Nextavenue.org, the PBS site for people 50+, where he is also the editor of the Money and Work & Purpose channels.<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Previously, he was Executive Editor of Money magazine, Front Page Finance Editor of Yahoo! and Special Projects Director/Money Editor at Good Housekeeping.<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> He is author of two books: How to Avoid a Midlife Financial Crisis and The Money Book of Personal Finance.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> How can you apply lessons from The Blue Zones? Listen in on our conversation with Richard Eisenberg of Next AvenueClick To Tweet<br /> <br /> ___________________________________________________________________________<br /> <br />  <br /> For more on Richard Eisenberg:<br /> Read his Series on Blue Zones mentioned in this podcast<br /> <br /> Follow Richard Eisenberg on Twitter<br /> <br />  <br /> More Retirement Podcast Episodes <br />  <br /> Related Book Review You May Like:<br /> IKIGAI: The Japanese Secret to a Long and Happy Life<br /> <br /> <br /> Free Tools<br /> Tap into access to free tools on our website to assist with your retirement planning, including retirement calculators, a longevity calculator and an Am I Ready to Retire? quiz at retirementwisdom.com<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> _____________________________________________________________________________<br /> <br /> Stay in the Loop<br /> <br /> Sign up for our monthly newsletter Wisdom Notes. Retirement Wisdom clean 18:59
Your Retirement Won’t Come with a Road Map – Carol Hymowitz https://www.retirementwisdom.com/retirement-transition-roadmap-carol-hymowitz-podcast/ Fri, 26 Jul 2019 20:57:10 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=11905 What advice from well-meaning friends and colleagues will help you in transitioning to retirement? Well, this journalist shares the view that because every person's retirement is different, it's best to find your own path. As an author and journalist, Carol Hymowitz has a unique perspective on the world of work, longevity and how some savvy employers are wising up and leveraging older workers. Recently a visiting scholar at Stanford’s Center on Longevity, Carol was formerly an Editor at Large at Bloomberg, and a Senior Editor and columnist at the Wall Street Journal, where she spent most of her journalism career. Reflections on Transitioning to Retirement and Working Longer When you begin to contemplate how to retire, there’s no shortage of advice from well-meaning colleagues and friends. But every retirement is different. It can quickly become clear that you need to discover your own path. In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Carol Hymowitz on her observations on older workers today - and what she’s learning since retiring in 2017 and continuing to work as a freelance journalist. She shares her insights on her journey, what’s surprised her so far and how a co-worker played a role in her decision-making. Wise Quote: On the Value of Experimenting in Retirement: "I think experimenting was crucial. There was no way not to do that unless I was going to get myself into one lane and rigidly stick to that. But by experimenting, it gave me a chance to try different things out and see how I felt about it and then make changes faster. I mean going from a full-time job in one organization where your days are very structured, you pretty much have an order to what you're doing. You have instructions about what's expected of you (and you go to) to not having that. It's a big transition and the best advice I got was don't make too many final choices or set choices quickly. Take your time to play around because it's the only way to find out how do I really want to spend your time? And if there's one thing that most people who hit 60 and over feel, it's that time is precious, it's obvious, it's maybe a little cliche, but you do feel it. How do I want to spend my time?"   Where's your retirement roadmap? Listen in to our conversation with journalist Carol Hymowitz on why you'll need to craft your ownClick To Tweet ___________________________________________________________________________   For more on Carol Hymowitz:   The article mentioned in this episode: Looking for a Road Map for Retirement? Good Luck With That - The Wall Street Journal (subscription)   Additional articles on Older Workers by Carol Hymowitz: How Health Care Employers Are Welcoming Older Workers: And Why Other Industries May Wind Up Following Their Lead  -  Next Avenue Retiring (Again and Again) in America - Bloomberg BusinessWeek           Follow Carol Hymowitz on Twitter:  @carolhymowitz   Bio: Carol Hymowitz researches, writes and speaks about the challenges and opportunities of living longer, including lengthening careers and work transitions, retirement savings, health, and lifestyle and was recently a visiting scholar at Stanford’s Center on Longevity. She formerly was an Editor at Large at Bloomberg, where she wrote and edited award-winning stories about the longevity economy, gender, and racial inequality and global business leaders. Previously she was a Senior Editor and In the Lead management columnist at the Wall Street Journal, where she spent most of her journalism career, and she also was Editorial Director of Forbes Media’s Forbes Woman website. She is the co-author of A History of Women in America and a contributing author of Getting Older: How We’re Coping with the Gray Areas of Aging. Carol is a board director at the Women’s Refugee Commission. She received a B.A. with honors in literature from Brandeis University and an M.S. What advice from well-meaning friends and colleagues will help you in transitioning to retirement? Well, this journalist shares the view that because every person’s retirement is different, it’s best to find your own path. As an author and journalist, Carol Hymowitz has a unique perspective on the world of work, longevity and how some savvy employers are wising up and leveraging older workers. Recently a visiting scholar at Stanford’s Center on Longevity, Carol was formerly an Editor at Large at Bloomberg, and a Senior Editor and columnist at the Wall Street Journal, where she spent most of her journalism career.

Reflections on Transitioning to Retirement and Working Longer

When you begin to contemplate how to retire, there’s no shortage of advice from well-meaning colleagues and friends. But every retirement is different. It can quickly become clear that you need to discover your own path.

In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Carol Hymowitz on her observations on older workers today – and what she’s learning since retiring in 2017 and continuing to work as a freelance journalist. She shares her insights on her journey, what’s surprised her so far and how a co-worker played a role in her decision-making.

Wise Quote:

On the Value of Experimenting in Retirement:

“I think experimenting was crucial. There was no way not to do that unless I was going to get myself into one lane and rigidly stick to that. But by experimenting, it gave me a chance to try different things out and see how I felt about it and then make changes faster. I mean going from a full-time job in one organization where your days are very structured, you pretty much have an order to what you’re doing. You have instructions about what’s expected of you (and you go to) to not having that.

It’s a big transition and the best advice I got was don’t make too many final choices or set choices quickly. Take your time to play around because it’s the only way to find out how do I really want to spend your time? And if there’s one thing that most people who hit 60 and over feel, it’s that time is precious, it’s obvious, it’s maybe a little cliche, but you do feel it. How do I want to spend my time?”

 


Where's your retirement roadmap? Listen in to our conversation with journalist Carol Hymowitz on why you'll need to craft your own
Click To Tweet


___________________________________________________________________________

 

For more on Carol Hymowitz:

 

The article mentioned in this episode:

Looking for a Road Map for Retirement? Good Luck With ThatThe Wall Street Journal (subscription)

 

Additional articles on Older Workers by Carol Hymowitz:

How Health Care Employers Are Welcoming Older Workers: And Why Other Industries May Wind Up Following Their Lead  –  Next Avenue

Retiring (Again and Again) in AmericaBloomberg BusinessWeek        

 

Follow Carol Hymowitz on Twitter:

 @carolhymowitz

 

Bio:

Carol Hymowitz researches, writes and speaks about the challenges and opportunities of living longer, including lengthening careers and work transitions, retirement savings, health, and lifestyle and was recently a visiting scholar at Stanford’s Center on Longevity.

She formerly was an Editor at Large at Bloomberg, where she wrote and edited award-winning stories about the longevity economy, gender, and racial inequality and global business leaders. Previously she was a Senior Editor and In the Lead management columnist at the Wall Street Journal, where she spent most of her journalism career, and she also was Editorial Director of Forbes Media’s Forbes Woman website.

She is the co-author of A History of Women in America and a contributing author of Getting Older: How We’re Coping with the Gray Areas of Aging. Carol is a board director at the Women’s Refugee Commission.

She received a B.A. with honors in literature from Brandeis University and an M.S. from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism.

___________________________________________________________________________

Related Podcasts

Will Your Second Act Be in the Gig Economy?

Are You Ready to Follow Your Own Path in Retirement?

 

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What advice from well-meaning friends and colleagues will help you in transitioning to retirement? Well, this journalist shares the view that because every person's retirement is different, it's best to find your own path. As an author and journalist, What advice from well-meaning friends and colleagues will help you in transitioning to retirement? Well, this journalist shares the view that because every person's retirement is different, it's best to find your own path. As an author and journalist, Carol Hymowitz has a unique perspective on the world of work, longevity and how some savvy employers are wising up and leveraging older workers. Recently a visiting scholar at Stanford’s Center on Longevity, Carol was formerly an Editor at Large at Bloomberg, and a Senior Editor and columnist at the Wall Street Journal, where she spent most of her journalism career.<br /> Reflections on Transitioning to Retirement and Working Longer<br /> When you begin to contemplate how to retire, there’s no shortage of advice from well-meaning colleagues and friends. But every retirement is different. It can quickly become clear that you need to discover your own path.<br /> <br /> In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Carol Hymowitz on her observations on older workers today - and what she’s learning since retiring in 2017 and continuing to work as a freelance journalist. She shares her insights on her journey, what’s surprised her so far and how a co-worker played a role in her decision-making.<br /> Wise Quote:<br /> On the Value of Experimenting in Retirement:<br /> <br /> "I think experimenting was crucial. There was no way not to do that unless I was going to get myself into one lane and rigidly stick to that. But by experimenting, it gave me a chance to try different things out and see how I felt about it and then make changes faster. I mean going from a full-time job in one organization where your days are very structured, you pretty much have an order to what you're doing. You have instructions about what's expected of you (and you go to) to not having that.<br /> <br /> It's a big transition and the best advice I got was don't make too many final choices or set choices quickly. Take your time to play around because it's the only way to find out how do I really want to spend your time? And if there's one thing that most people who hit 60 and over feel, it's that time is precious, it's obvious, it's maybe a little cliche, but you do feel it. How do I want to spend my time?"<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Where's your retirement roadmap? Listen in to our conversation with journalist Carol Hymowitz on why you'll need to craft your ownClick To Tweet<br /> <br /> ___________________________________________________________________________<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> For more on Carol Hymowitz:<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> The article mentioned in this episode: <br /> <br /> Looking for a Road Map for Retirement? Good Luck With That - The Wall Street Journal (subscription)<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Additional articles on Older Workers by Carol Hymowitz:<br /> <br /> How Health Care Employers Are Welcoming Older Workers: And Why Other Industries May Wind Up Following Their Lead  -  Next Avenue<br /> <br /> Retiring (Again and Again) in America - Bloomberg BusinessWeek         <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Follow Carol Hymowitz on Twitter:<br /> <br />  @carolhymowitz<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Bio:<br /> <br /> Carol Hymowitz researches, writes and speaks about the challenges and opportunities of living longer, including lengthening careers and work transitions, retirement savings, health, and lifestyle and was recently a visiting scholar at Stanford’s Center on Longevity.<br /> <br /> She formerly was an Editor at Large at Bloomberg, where she wrote and edited award-winning stories about the longevity economy, gender, and racial inequality and global business leaders. Previously she was a Senior Editor and In the Lead management columnist at the Wall Street Journal, where she spent most of her journalism career, and she also was Editorial Director of Forbes Media’s Forbes Woman website.<br /> <br /> Retirement Wisdom clean 28:14
Will Your Second Act Career Be In The Gig Economy? – Diane Mulcahy https://www.retirementwisdom.com/second-act-career-gig-economy-podcast/ Thu, 18 Jul 2019 19:21:44 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=11798 Whether it's to create a second act career as a consultant, to gain greater flexibility or to generate extra income in retirement, the gig economy offers both opportunities and challenges. In fact, today it’s relevant for virtually every age group and career stage. The demand for freelance talent continues to grow and it may offer new options to leverage your skills and experience. But the challenges and transition issues are real and it’s wise to be prepared. Becoming savvy about how to navigate it well will enhance your chances of success. We talk with Diane Mulcahy, author of The Gig Economy about how it’s expanding, changing the world of work and impacting retirement. Before it was even a thing, Diane created the first course in the U.S. on the Gig Economy and teaches it in the MBA program at Babson College. The course gained immediate traction and was named by Forbes as one of the Top Ten Most Innovate Business School Courses in the country. If you’re considering working longer or pursuing a second act career in the gig economy, you’ll want to hear Diane’s perspective on how to plan ahead. Wise Quote: On Planning Ahead "I would offer two tactical steps. The first is, (and I have this exercise in my book as well) ...The first is to develop an exit strategy. And what I mean by that is develop a real and concrete tactical plan for leading your job. So the exercise that I have my students and my readers do is this, imagine that you knew that you are going to be laid off in six months. What would you do to prepare? What would you do professionally? You know, what conferences would you go to? What colleagues would you reach out to? What kind of networking would you do? What kind of skills would you make sure were up-to-date on certifications, things like that? What kinds of financial things would you, do you know what? What expenses would you cut down on? What would you save?" "How much would you contribute to your retirement? What corporate benefits would you take advantage of, whether it's, you know, 401k contributions or education or professional development, and what would you do personally? How would you think about the impact of a layoff on your personal domestic situation? What about your living situation? Is there something there that you would change in terms of where you would rather live or what you would think about in terms of your commute or how this affects your household? So think about that, all of those different dimensions, and make a list kind of a to-do list of what you would do if you knew you were getting laid off in six months. And then I would suggest really talking about that with other people, particularly if you know people who have been laid off or who are already retired and have negotiated that transition successfully. Find out what can you learn from how they made the transition and things that they did to make it successful." For more on Diane Mulcahy: Diane Mulcahy’s book The Gig Economy: The Complete Guide to Getting Better Work, Taking More Time Off and Financing the Life You Want Diane’s website Bio Before the Gig Economy was even a thing, Diane created and started to teach an MBA class called The Gig Economy at Babson College. The class gained immediate traction and was named by Forbes as one of the Top 10 Most Innovative Business School Classes in the country. Diane is an active and enthusiastic participant in the Gig Economy. In between full-time jobs and consulting gigs in private equity and venture capital, Diane has been a Visiting Fellow at Trinity College in Dublin, an Executive-in-Residence at Babson College, and an Eisenhower Fellow. She has taken two different years off to travel around the world. Diane is currently a Senior Fellow at the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation and an Adjunct Lecturer at Babson College. She has previously written and published two books and a widely-read report on venture capital. Whether it’s to create a second act career as a consultant, to gain greater flexibility or to generate extra income in retirement, the gig economy offers both opportunities and challenges. In fact, today it’s relevant for virtually every age group and career stage. The demand for freelance talent continues to grow and it may offer new options to leverage your skills and experience. But the challenges and transition issues are real and it’s wise to be prepared. Becoming savvy about how to navigate it well will enhance your chances of success.

We talk with Diane Mulcahy, author of The Gig Economy about how it’s expanding, changing the world of work and impacting retirement. Before it was even a thing, Diane created the first course in the U.S. on the Gig Economy and teaches it in the MBA program at Babson College. The course gained immediate traction and was named by Forbes as one of the Top Ten Most Innovate Business School Courses in the country.

If you’re considering working longer or pursuing a second act career in the gig economy, you’ll want to hear Diane’s perspective on how to plan ahead.

Wise Quote:

On Planning Ahead

“I would offer two tactical steps. The first is, (and I have this exercise in my book as well) …The first is to develop an exit strategy. And what I mean by that is develop a real and concrete tactical plan for leading your job. So the exercise that I have my students and my readers do is this, imagine that you knew that you are going to be laid off in six months. What would you do to prepare? What would you do professionally? You know, what conferences would you go to? What colleagues would you reach out to? What kind of networking would you do? What kind of skills would you make sure were up-to-date on certifications, things like that? What kinds of financial things would you, do you know what? What expenses would you cut down on? What would you save?”

“How much would you contribute to your retirement? What corporate benefits would you take advantage of, whether it’s, you know, 401k contributions or education or professional development, and what would you do personally? How would you think about the impact of a layoff on your personal domestic situation? What about your living situation? Is there something there that you would change in terms of where you would rather live or what you would think about in terms of your commute or how this affects your household?

So think about that, all of those different dimensions, and make a list kind of a to-do list of what you would do if you knew you were getting laid off in six months. And then I would suggest really talking about that with other people, particularly if you know people who have been laid off or who are already retired and have negotiated that transition successfully. Find out what can you learn from how they made the transition and things that they did to make it successful.”

For more on Diane Mulcahy:

Diane Mulcahy’s book The Gig Economy: The Complete Guide to Getting Better Work, Taking More Time Off and Financing the Life You Want

Diane’s website

Bio

Before the Gig Economy was even a thing, Diane created and started to teach an MBA class called The Gig Economy at Babson College. The class gained immediate traction and was named by Forbes as one of the Top 10 Most Innovative Business School Classes in the country. Diane is an active and enthusiastic participant in the Gig Economy.

In between full-time jobs and consulting gigs in private equity and venture capital, Diane has been a Visiting Fellow at Trinity College in Dublin, an Executive-in-Residence at Babson College, and an Eisenhower Fellow. She has taken two different years off to travel around the world. Diane is currently a Senior Fellow at the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation and an Adjunct Lecturer at Babson College.

She has previously written and published two books and a widely-read report on venture capital. Her work has been featured in The Economist, The Financial Times, Forbes, Fortune, Harvard Business Review, The Irish Times, The New Yorker, The Wall Street Journal, as well as numerous industry publications.

Diane speaks and lectures at conferences and universities worldwide. When not working, Diane enjoys reading (mostly non-fiction), writing (only non-fiction), food (eating and cooking), wine, film, yoga, and running. Diane holds undergraduate and graduate degrees from Harvard University. She is a dual EU (Irish) and US citizen. She lives in Boston with her husband Kevin.

 

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Whether it's to create a second act career as a consultant, to gain greater flexibility or to generate extra income in retirement, the gig economy offers both opportunities and challenges. In fact, today it’s relevant for virtually every age group and ... Whether it's to create a second act career as a consultant, to gain greater flexibility or to generate extra income in retirement, the gig economy offers both opportunities and challenges. In fact, today it’s relevant for virtually every age group and career stage. The demand for freelance talent continues to grow and it may offer new options to leverage your skills and experience. But the challenges and transition issues are real and it’s wise to be prepared. Becoming savvy about how to navigate it well will enhance your chances of success.<br /> <br /> We talk with Diane Mulcahy, author of The Gig Economy about how it’s expanding, changing the world of work and impacting retirement. Before it was even a thing, Diane created the first course in the U.S. on the Gig Economy and teaches it in the MBA program at Babson College. The course gained immediate traction and was named by Forbes as one of the Top Ten Most Innovate Business School Courses in the country.<br /> <br /> If you’re considering working longer or pursuing a second act career in the gig economy, you’ll want to hear Diane’s perspective on how to plan ahead.<br /> Wise Quote:<br /> On Planning Ahead<br /> <br /> "I would offer two tactical steps. The first is, (and I have this exercise in my book as well) ...The first is to develop an exit strategy. And what I mean by that is develop a real and concrete tactical plan for leading your job. So the exercise that I have my students and my readers do is this, imagine that you knew that you are going to be laid off in six months. What would you do to prepare? What would you do professionally? You know, what conferences would you go to? What colleagues would you reach out to? What kind of networking would you do? What kind of skills would you make sure were up-to-date on certifications, things like that? What kinds of financial things would you, do you know what? What expenses would you cut down on? What would you save?"<br /> <br /> "How much would you contribute to your retirement? What corporate benefits would you take advantage of, whether it's, you know, 401k contributions or education or professional development, and what would you do personally? How would you think about the impact of a layoff on your personal domestic situation? What about your living situation? Is there something there that you would change in terms of where you would rather live or what you would think about in terms of your commute or how this affects your household?<br /> <br /> So think about that, all of those different dimensions, and make a list kind of a to-do list of what you would do if you knew you were getting laid off in six months. And then I would suggest really talking about that with other people, particularly if you know people who have been laid off or who are already retired and have negotiated that transition successfully. Find out what can you learn from how they made the transition and things that they did to make it successful."<br /> For more on Diane Mulcahy:<br /> Diane Mulcahy’s book The Gig Economy: The Complete Guide to Getting Better Work, Taking More Time Off and Financing the Life You Want<br /> <br /> Diane’s website<br /> Bio<br /> Before the Gig Economy was even a thing, Diane created and started to teach an MBA class called The Gig Economy at Babson College. The class gained immediate traction and was named by Forbes as one of the Top 10 Most Innovative Business School Classes in the country. Diane is an active and enthusiastic participant in the Gig Economy.<br /> <br /> In between full-time jobs and consulting gigs in private equity and venture capital, Diane has been a Visiting Fellow at Trinity College in Dublin, an Executive-in-Residence at Babson College, and an Eisenhower Fellow. She has taken two different years off to travel around the world. Diane is currently a Senior Fellow at the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation and an Adjunct Lecturer at Babson College.<br /> <br /> Retirement Wisdom clean 26:49
How Life Hacks Can Help Make Your Retirement the Best Time of Your Life – Sam Horn https://www.retirementwisdom.com/make-retirement-best-time-of-life-podcast/ Thu, 27 Jun 2019 17:54:44 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=11544 Do you know anyone who's enjoying semi-retirement? It's an option worth considering. In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Author, Keynote Speaker and Communications Strategist Sam Horn.  We discuss her new book Someday Is Not a Day in the Week: 10 Hacks to Make the Rest of Your Life the Best of Your Life. Is semi-retirement the best option for you/ What About Half-Retiring? Sam shares her wisdom (and her great stories) on a range of topics including what gets in the way of people realizing their dreams in retirement.  She suggests strategies on how to overcome common obstacles and she previews life hacks you can use to move forward. She also explains how the option of Half-Retiring is a way to retire smarter. Is Semi-Retirement the Best Way to Test a Second Career? In her view, semi-retirement gives you a path to try out a second career.  It's a way to transition to retirement gradually - and on your own terms. In Sam's opinion,  semi-retirement may offer the best of both worlds. Sam also shares tools and quick, powerful exercises in real-time that you can use in planning for the other side of retirement. Wise Quote: On Semi-retirement "I'm so glad you brought this up because he part-time is doing the same thing, just less of it. So whatever it is we're doing, instead of working 60 hours or 50 hours a week, we work for half that. Well, I believe half-retiring is that we don't keep doing the same thing. We look in our life about what we really love to do and instead of theme that we'll all have more fun when my work is done or I have my profession and I have my passion, I have my work and I have my recreation instead of seeing those as separate, what if we can blend them? So we have the best of both worlds right now." For more on Sam Horn: Someday Is Not a Day in the Week on Amazon Sam Horn’s Websites:   (The Intrigue Agency) Sam Horn’s Happiness Box   Bio Sam Horn is CEO of the Intrigue Agency, an international keynote speaker, author, and book consultant. She has spoken to more than a half-million people worldwide and for hundreds of organizations, including National Geographic, Cisco, Fortune 500 Forum, Intel, Ernst Young, Capital One, and NASA. She has been interviewed on dozens of network TV and radio shows (NBC, ABC, CBS, FOX) and on NPR and MSNBC and has been profiled, quoted, or published in publications including the Washington Post, the New York Times, BusinessWeek, Forbes, Huffington Post, Readers Digest, Cosmopolitan, and the Boston Globe. Sam is the author of several previous books including the Washington Post bestseller Got Your Attention?   Sam’s Article On MarketWatch:  How to find happiness when you’re afraid of retirement   Sign Up for Our New Monthly Newsletter - Wisdom Notes Stay in the loop. Subscribe here Do you know anyone who’s enjoying semi-retirement? It’s an option worth considering.

In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Author, Keynote Speaker and Communications Strategist Sam Horn.  We discuss her new book Someday Is Not a Day in the Week: 10 Hacks to Make the Rest of Your Life the Best of Your Life. Is semi-retirement the best option for you/

What About Half-Retiring?

Sam shares her wisdom (and her great stories) on a range of topics including what gets in the way of people realizing their dreams in retirement.  She suggests strategies on how to overcome common obstacles and she previews life hacks you can use to move forward. She also explains how the option of Half-Retiring is a way to retire smarter.

Is Semi-Retirement the Best Way to Test a Second Career?

In her view, semi-retirement gives you a path to try out a second career.  It’s a way to transition to retirement gradually – and on your own terms. In Sam’s opinion,  semi-retirement may offer the best of both worlds. Sam also shares tools and quick, powerful exercises in real-time that you can use in planning for the other side of retirement.

Wise Quote:

On Semi-retirement

“I’m so glad you brought this up because he part-time is doing the same thing, just less of it. So whatever it is we’re doing, instead of working 60 hours or 50 hours a week, we work for half that. Well, I believe half-retiring is that we don’t keep doing the same thing. We look in our life about what we really love to do and instead of theme that we’ll all have more fun when my work is done or I have my profession and I have my passion, I have my work and I have my recreation instead of seeing those as separate, what if we can blend them? So we have the best of both worlds right now.”

For more on Sam Horn:

Someday Is Not a Day in the Week on Amazon

Sam Horn’s Websites:   (The Intrigue Agency)

Sam Horn’s Happiness Box

 

Bio

Sam Horn is CEO of the Intrigue Agency, an international keynote speaker, author, and book consultant. She has spoken to more than a half-million people worldwide and for hundreds of organizations, including National Geographic, Cisco, Fortune 500 Forum, Intel, Ernst Young, Capital One, and NASA.

She has been interviewed on dozens of network TV and radio shows (NBC, ABC, CBS, FOX) and on NPR and MSNBC and has been profiled, quoted, or published in publications including the Washington Post, the New York Times, BusinessWeek, Forbes, Huffington Post, Readers Digest, Cosmopolitan, and the Boston Globe.

Sam is the author of several previous books including the Washington Post bestseller Got Your Attention?

 

Sam’s Article On MarketWatch:  How to find happiness when you’re afraid of retirement

 


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Do you know anyone who's enjoying semi-retirement? It's an option worth considering. - In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Author, Keynote Speaker and Communications Strategist Sam Horn. Do you know anyone who's enjoying semi-retirement? It's an option worth considering.<br /> <br /> In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Author, Keynote Speaker and Communications Strategist Sam Horn.  We discuss her new book Someday Is Not a Day in the Week: 10 Hacks to Make the Rest of Your Life the Best of Your Life. Is semi-retirement the best option for you/<br /> What About Half-Retiring?<br /> Sam shares her wisdom (and her great stories) on a range of topics including what gets in the way of people realizing their dreams in retirement.  She suggests strategies on how to overcome common obstacles and she previews life hacks you can use to move forward. She also explains how the option of Half-Retiring is a way to retire smarter.<br /> Is Semi-Retirement the Best Way to Test a Second Career?<br /> In her view, semi-retirement gives you a path to try out a second career.  It's a way to transition to retirement gradually - and on your own terms. In Sam's opinion,  semi-retirement may offer the best of both worlds. Sam also shares tools and quick, powerful exercises in real-time that you can use in planning for the other side of retirement.<br /> <br /> Wise Quote:<br /> On Semi-retirement<br /> <br /> "I'm so glad you brought this up because he part-time is doing the same thing, just less of it. So whatever it is we're doing, instead of working 60 hours or 50 hours a week, we work for half that. Well, I believe half-retiring is that we don't keep doing the same thing. We look in our life about what we really love to do and instead of theme that we'll all have more fun when my work is done or I have my profession and I have my passion, I have my work and I have my recreation instead of seeing those as separate, what if we can blend them? So we have the best of both worlds right now."<br /> <br /> For more on Sam Horn:<br /> Someday Is Not a Day in the Week on Amazon<br /> <br /> Sam Horn’s Websites:   (The Intrigue Agency)<br /> <br /> Sam Horn’s Happiness Box<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Bio<br /> <br /> Sam Horn is CEO of the Intrigue Agency, an international keynote speaker, author, and book consultant. She has spoken to more than a half-million people worldwide and for hundreds of organizations, including National Geographic, Cisco, Fortune 500 Forum, Intel, Ernst Young, Capital One, and NASA.<br /> <br /> She has been interviewed on dozens of network TV and radio shows (NBC, ABC, CBS, FOX) and on NPR and MSNBC and has been profiled, quoted, or published in publications including the Washington Post, the New York Times, BusinessWeek, Forbes, Huffington Post, Readers Digest, Cosmopolitan, and the Boston Globe.<br /> <br /> Sam is the author of several previous books including the Washington Post bestseller Got Your Attention?<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Sam’s Article On MarketWatch:  How to find happiness when you’re afraid of retirement<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Sign Up for Our New Monthly Newsletter - Wisdom Notes<br /> Stay in the loop. Subscribe here Retirement Wisdom clean 50:33
What’s Next for You? – Jeff Tidwell https://www.retirementwisdom.com/mid-life-career-shift-podcast/ Thu, 20 Jun 2019 18:53:28 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=11535     Thinking about a midlife career change? In this episode, we catch up with Jeff Tidwell, who is the CEO and Co-Founder of Next For Me, a resource that “connects and inspires our generation to evolve our post-50 lives through new work, a new purpose, or a new social contribution.”     Ready for a Career Change? Jeff shares his insights on the challenges and opportunities faced by the 50+ generation, the resources needed to overcome obstacles and make a career change, build a second act career or create a new entrepreneurial path. Jeff also discusses his own experiences as an entrepreneur and his key lessons learned so far. Are you curious about what's next for you? Tune in to the story of Jeff Tidwell, his company Next for Me - and what he's hearing from the 50+ crowd at their events.Click To Tweet   Wise Quotes:   "Well, number one is the mindset. Are you open to new ways of doing things? Because so often we hear, I don't want to learn Slack, I don't need another data input. Why are you using Google Docs when I'm so comfortable with Microsoft Word and so we're getting in our own way because we're limiting our creativity around ways to do work. And so you got to step away from the way you've been doing things, be open to new ways of doing things, hang out with people who are digital natives. It might be a little confounding to you, ask them - they're usually wide open to helping out." "Be open to new ways of doing things. Lifelong learning is (key). If you're into that anyway, you already know the benefits of it, but be open to learning new things, trying new things, not getting stuck on the old ways you're accustomed to doing things. The world's moving fast and things change, run with it, have fun."     Bio   Jeff Tidwell began his career with alternative newspapers and then moved online, where he has worked in Silicon Valley and New York overseeing online communities and user experience for E*TRADE, WebMD, Oncology.com, MarketTools, Chirp Interactive and many startups via his consulting practice prepop. Today, he’s the CEO and Co-Founder of Next For Me. He has been a featured speaker at Tech Inclusion, is a regular contributor to Forbes “Chronicles . of a 50+Entrepreneur” and is a regular guest on podcasts and ‘longevity economy’ conferences and events.   For more on Jeff Tidwell and Next For Me: Next for Me website Forbes series on startups and entrepreneurship Related Retirement Wisdom podcast episodes you may like:   Why People Make a Career Change with Purpose Top of Mind - Chris Farrell If You Plan How Life Hacks Can Help Make Your Retirement the Best Time of Your Life – Sam Horn       Like our Podcast? The best way to support our podcast is to take a moment and post a rating on Apple Podcasts. Thank you.  If you have suggestions on how we can make it better or on topics you’d like to see us cover, please reach out to Joe Casey at joec@retirementwisdom.com  

 

Thinking about a midlife career change?

In this episode, we catch up with Jeff Tidwell, who is the CEO and Co-Founder of Next For Me, a resource that “connects and inspires our generation to evolve our post-50 lives through new work, a new purpose, or a new social contribution.”

 

 

Ready for a Career Change?

Jeff shares his insights on the challenges and opportunities faced by the 50+ generation, the resources needed to overcome obstacles and make a career change, build a second act career or create a new entrepreneurial path.

Jeff also discusses his own experiences as an entrepreneur and his key lessons learned so far.


Are you curious about what's next for you? Tune in to the story of Jeff Tidwell, his company Next for Me - and what he's hearing from the 50+ crowd at their events.
Click To Tweet


 

Wise Quotes:

 

“Well, number one is the mindset. Are you open to new ways of doing things? Because so often we hear, I don’t want to learn Slack, I don’t need another data input. Why are you using Google Docs when I’m so comfortable with Microsoft Word and so we’re getting in our own way because we’re limiting our creativity around ways to do work.

And so you got to step away from the way you’ve been doing things, be open to new ways of doing things, hang out with people who are digital natives. It might be a little confounding to you, ask them – they’re usually wide open to helping out.”

“Be open to new ways of doing things. Lifelong learning is (key). If you’re into that anyway, you already know the benefits of it, but be open to learning new things, trying new things, not getting stuck on the old ways you’re accustomed to doing things. The world’s moving fast and things change, run with it, have fun.”

 

 

Bio

 

Jeff Tidwell began his career with alternative newspapers and then moved online, where he has worked in Silicon Valley and New York overseeing online communities and user experience for E*TRADE, WebMD, Oncology.com, MarketTools, Chirp Interactive and many startups via his consulting practice prepop.

Today, he’s the CEO and Co-Founder of Next For Me. He has been a featured speaker at Tech Inclusion, is a regular contributor to Forbes “Chronicles . of a 50+Entrepreneur” and is a regular guest on podcasts and ‘longevity economy’ conferences and events.

 

For more on Jeff Tidwell and Next For Me:

Next for Me website

Forbes series on startups and entrepreneurship

Related Retirement Wisdom podcast episodes you may like:

 

Why People Make a Career Change with Purpose Top of Mind – Chris Farrell

If You Plan

How Life Hacks Can Help Make Your Retirement the Best Time of Your Life – Sam Horn

 

 


 

Like our Podcast?

The best way to support our podcast is to take a moment and post a rating on Apple Podcasts. Thank you. 

If you have suggestions on how we can make it better or on topics you’d like to see us cover, please reach out to Joe Casey at joec@retirementwisdom.com

]]>
  -   - Thinking about a midlife career change? - In this episode, we catch up with Jeff Tidwell, who is the CEO and Co-Founder of Next For Me, a resource that “connects and inspires our generation to evolve our post-50 lives through new work,  <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Thinking about a midlife career change?<br /> <br /> In this episode, we catch up with Jeff Tidwell, who is the CEO and Co-Founder of Next For Me, a resource that “connects and inspires our generation to evolve our post-50 lives through new work, a new purpose, or a new social contribution.”<br /> <br />  <br /> <br />  <br /> Ready for a Career Change?<br /> Jeff shares his insights on the challenges and opportunities faced by the 50+ generation, the resources needed to overcome obstacles and make a career change, build a second act career or create a new entrepreneurial path.<br /> <br /> Jeff also discusses his own experiences as an entrepreneur and his key lessons learned so far.<br /> <br /> Are you curious about what's next for you? Tune in to the story of Jeff Tidwell, his company Next for Me - and what he's hearing from the 50+ crowd at their events.Click To Tweet<br /> <br />  <br /> Wise Quotes:<br />  <br /> <br /> "Well, number one is the mindset. Are you open to new ways of doing things? Because so often we hear, I don't want to learn Slack, I don't need another data input. Why are you using Google Docs when I'm so comfortable with Microsoft Word and so we're getting in our own way because we're limiting our creativity around ways to do work.<br /> <br /> And so you got to step away from the way you've been doing things, be open to new ways of doing things, hang out with people who are digital natives. It might be a little confounding to you, ask them - they're usually wide open to helping out."<br /> <br /> "Be open to new ways of doing things. Lifelong learning is (key). If you're into that anyway, you already know the benefits of it, but be open to learning new things, trying new things, not getting stuck on the old ways you're accustomed to doing things. The world's moving fast and things change, run with it, have fun."<br /> <br />  <br /> <br />  <br /> Bio<br />  <br /> <br /> Jeff Tidwell began his career with alternative newspapers and then moved online, where he has worked in Silicon Valley and New York overseeing online communities and user experience for E*TRADE, WebMD, Oncology.com, MarketTools, Chirp Interactive and many startups via his consulting practice prepop.<br /> <br /> Today, he’s the CEO and Co-Founder of Next For Me. He has been a featured speaker at Tech Inclusion, is a regular contributor to Forbes “Chronicles . of a 50+Entrepreneur” and is a regular guest on podcasts and ‘longevity economy’ conferences and events.<br /> <br />  <br /> For more on Jeff Tidwell and Next For Me:<br /> Next for Me website<br /> <br /> Forbes series on startups and entrepreneurship<br /> <br /> Related Retirement Wisdom podcast episodes you may like:<br />  <br /> <br /> Why People Make a Career Change with Purpose Top of Mind - Chris Farrell<br /> <br /> If You Plan<br /> <br /> How Life Hacks Can Help Make Your Retirement the Best Time of Your Life – Sam Horn<br /> <br />  <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Like our Podcast?<br /> <br /> The best way to support our podcast is to take a moment and post a rating on Apple Podcasts. Thank you. <br /> <br /> If you have suggestions on how we can make it better or on topics you’d like to see us cover, please reach out to Joe Casey at joec@retirementwisdom.com Retirement Wisdom clean 27:32
Are You Ready to Follow Your Own Path in Retirement? – Bob Lowry https://www.retirementwisdom.com/follow-own-path-retirement-podcast/ Tue, 28 May 2019 15:33:18 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=11476 In this episode, we catch up with retiree, author, and blogger Bob Lowry, who has been blogging about having a productive and fulfilling retirement at Satisfying Retirement.com for the past 9 years. How to Retire to a Satisfying Retirement Want to retire smarter? Forge your own path. Bob shares his insights and practical wisdom on the essential ingredients in a satisfying retirement, the key obstacles that need to be overcome and the lessons he’s learning in his own retirement.  We also discuss the benefits of a short sabbatical and what a Radical Retirement looks like for some people. It's a conversation that will give you some inrersting retirement ideas to consider. What does it take to create a satisfying retirement? Bob Lowry shares his insights.Click To Tweet Wise Quotes: On the Transition to Retirement and Adaptability "There's fear of the unknown because none of us walked down this path ahead of time. It's all brand new from the first day you do it. I take it that the fear of the unknown is probably the biggest. Well-meaning advice of others can get in the way. It's great to hear what other people think, but you'll drive yourself crazy if you try to say, "I'm going to have my retirement just like that guy, or just like my father-in-law, or just like whomever." Trying to follow what others do is probably the second biggest mistake. I think maybe since retirement really is a journey, you got to be ready to change whatever it is you're doing, your plans, how you live, where you live, the direction of your life. You got to be able to change that when it's not working. Assuming everything that you thought was going to happen will happen is wrong, and sticking with a plan you made forever, just because you made the plan, will not work. It's just like virtually any part of life or any time of life. It changes and you are going to have to learn to adjust to that change. But I would say that's an exciting part because retirees are no longer restricted to whatever path has been previously determined. I can decide tomorrow to write a blog about, I don't know, something else. I can decide tomorrow to move into my RV. I mean, there's all sorts of possibilities. It's that ability to abandon a plan, abandon what you think your life is going to be like, and follow the path of what you want your life to be."   For more on Bob Lowry:  Bob Lowry's website: Satisfying Retirement Bob Lowry’s Books on Retirement   Bio: Bob Lowry is the author of Preparing For Your Financial Future After Retirement, Preparing For Your Active Life After Retirement, Preparing To Make The Most of Your Free Time After Retirement and Living a Satisfying Retirement. Bob has been profiled in Money Magazine & CNN Money, as well as Ad Age Insight White Papers. He is a featured author in the nationally released books, "65 Things To Do When You Retire," "65 Things To Do When You Retire -Travel," "70 Things To Do When You Turn 70," and 80 Things To Do When You Turn 80." as well as an original contributor to PBS's website, Next Avenue. For the past 9 years, Bob has been blogging about having a productive and fulfilling retirement at Satisfying Retirement.com   Like our Podcast? The best way to support our retirement podcast is to take a moment and like it on Apple Podcasts. Thank you.  If you have suggestions on how we can make it better or on topics you’d like to see us cover, please reach out to Joe Casey at joec@retirementwisdom   Related Retirement Podcast Episodes The Soft Side of Retirement Your Retirement Won't Come with a Roadmap How Life Hacks Can Help Make Your Retirement the Best Time of Your Life In this episode, we catch up with retiree, author, and blogger Bob Lowry, who has been blogging about having a productive and fulfilling retirement at Satisfying Retirement.com for the past 9 years.

How to Retire to a Satisfying Retirement

Want to retire smarter? Forge your own path. Bob shares his insights and practical wisdom on the essential ingredients in a satisfying retirement, the key obstacles that need to be overcome and the lessons he’s learning in his own retirement.  We also discuss the benefits of a short sabbatical and what a Radical Retirement looks like for some people. It’s a conversation that will give you some inrersting retirement ideas to consider.


What does it take to create a satisfying retirement? Bob Lowry shares his insights.
Click To Tweet


Wise Quotes:

On the Transition to Retirement and Adaptability

“There’s fear of the unknown because none of us walked down this path ahead of time. It’s all brand new from the first day you do it. I take it that the fear of the unknown is probably the biggest.

Well-meaning advice of others can get in the way. It’s great to hear what other people think, but you’ll drive yourself crazy if you try to say, “I’m going to have my retirement just like that guy, or just like my father-in-law, or just like whomever.”

Trying to follow what others do is probably the second biggest mistake. I think maybe since retirement really is a journey, you got to be ready to change whatever it is you’re doing, your plans, how you live, where you live, the direction of your life. You got to be able to change that when it’s not working. Assuming everything that you thought was going to happen will happen is wrong, and sticking with a plan you made forever, just because you made the plan, will not work.

It’s just like virtually any part of life or any time of life. It changes and you are going to have to learn to adjust to that change. But I would say that’s an exciting part because retirees are no longer restricted to whatever path has been previously determined. I can decide tomorrow to write a blog about, I don’t know, something else. I can decide tomorrow to move into my RV. I mean, there’s all sorts of possibilities. It’s that ability to abandon a plan, abandon what you think your life is going to be like, and follow the path of what you want your life to be.”

 

For more on Bob Lowry: 

Bob Lowry’s website: Satisfying Retirement

Bob Lowry’s Books on Retirement

 

Bio:

Bob Lowry is the author of Preparing For Your Financial Future After Retirement, Preparing For Your Active Life After Retirement, Preparing To Make The Most of Your Free Time After Retirement and Living a Satisfying Retirement.

Bob has been profiled in Money Magazine & CNN Money, as well as Ad Age Insight White Papers. He is a featured author in the nationally released books, “65 Things To Do When You Retire,” “65 Things To Do When You Retire -Travel,” “70 Things To Do When You Turn 70,” and 80 Things To Do When You Turn 80.” as well as an original contributor to PBS’s website, Next Avenue.

For the past 9 years, Bob has been blogging about having a productive and fulfilling retirement at Satisfying Retirement.com

 


Like our Podcast?

The best way to support our retirement podcast is to take a moment and like it on Apple Podcasts. Thank you. 

If you have suggestions on how we can make it better or on topics you’d like to see us cover, please reach out to Joe Casey at joec@retirementwisdom

 

Related Retirement Podcast Episodes

The Soft Side of Retirement

Your Retirement Won’t Come with a Roadmap

How Life Hacks Can Help Make Your Retirement the Best Time of Your Life

]]>
In this episode, we catch up with retiree, author, and blogger Bob Lowry, who has been blogging about having a productive and fulfilling retirement at Satisfying Retirement.com for the past 9 years. How to Retire to a Satisfying Retirement In this episode, we catch up with retiree, author, and blogger Bob Lowry, who has been blogging about having a productive and fulfilling retirement at Satisfying Retirement.com for the past 9 years.<br /> How to Retire to a Satisfying Retirement<br /> Want to retire smarter? Forge your own path. Bob shares his insights and practical wisdom on the essential ingredients in a satisfying retirement, the key obstacles that need to be overcome and the lessons he’s learning in his own retirement.  We also discuss the benefits of a short sabbatical and what a Radical Retirement looks like for some people. It's a conversation that will give you some inrersting retirement ideas to consider.<br /> <br /> What does it take to create a satisfying retirement? Bob Lowry shares his insights.Click To Tweet<br /> Wise Quotes:<br /> On the Transition to Retirement and Adaptability<br /> <br /> "There's fear of the unknown because none of us walked down this path ahead of time. It's all brand new from the first day you do it. I take it that the fear of the unknown is probably the biggest.<br /> <br /> Well-meaning advice of others can get in the way. It's great to hear what other people think, but you'll drive yourself crazy if you try to say, "I'm going to have my retirement just like that guy, or just like my father-in-law, or just like whomever."<br /> <br /> Trying to follow what others do is probably the second biggest mistake. I think maybe since retirement really is a journey, you got to be ready to change whatever it is you're doing, your plans, how you live, where you live, the direction of your life. You got to be able to change that when it's not working. Assuming everything that you thought was going to happen will happen is wrong, and sticking with a plan you made forever, just because you made the plan, will not work.<br /> <br /> It's just like virtually any part of life or any time of life. It changes and you are going to have to learn to adjust to that change. But I would say that's an exciting part because retirees are no longer restricted to whatever path has been previously determined. I can decide tomorrow to write a blog about, I don't know, something else. I can decide tomorrow to move into my RV. I mean, there's all sorts of possibilities. It's that ability to abandon a plan, abandon what you think your life is going to be like, and follow the path of what you want your life to be."<br /> <br />  <br /> For more on Bob Lowry: <br /> Bob Lowry's website: Satisfying Retirement<br /> <br /> Bob Lowry’s Books on Retirement<br /> <br />  <br /> Bio:<br /> Bob Lowry is the author of Preparing For Your Financial Future After Retirement, Preparing For Your Active Life After Retirement, Preparing To Make The Most of Your Free Time After Retirement and Living a Satisfying Retirement.<br /> <br /> Bob has been profiled in Money Magazine & CNN Money, as well as Ad Age Insight White Papers. He is a featured author in the nationally released books, "65 Things To Do When You Retire," "65 Things To Do When You Retire -Travel," "70 Things To Do When You Turn 70," and 80 Things To Do When You Turn 80." as well as an original contributor to PBS's website, Next Avenue.<br /> <br /> For the past 9 years, Bob has been blogging about having a productive and fulfilling retirement at Satisfying Retirement.com<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Like our Podcast?<br /> <br /> The best way to support our retirement podcast is to take a moment and like it on Apple Podcasts. Thank you. <br /> <br /> If you have suggestions on how we can make it better or on topics you’d like to see us cover, please reach out to Joe Casey at joec@retirementwisdom<br /> <br />  <br /> Related Retirement Podcast Episodes<br /> The Soft Side of Retirement<br /> <br /> Your Retirement Won't Come with a Roadmap<br /> How Life Hacks Can Help Make Your Retirement the Best Time of Your Life Retirement Wisdom clean 31:52
If You Love Your Work, What Challenges Will You Face in Retirement? – Michelle Pannor Silver https://www.retirementwisdom.com/preparing-for-retirement-podcast/ Thu, 16 May 2019 15:56:40 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=11440 How do you prepare for retirement when you love what you do? It's especially hard when your work has become who you are. In this episode we talk with Michelle Pannor Silver, of The University of Toronto, author of Retirement and Its Discontents: Why We Won't Stop Working, Even if We Can.   Prepare for Your Retirement Transition with Research-based Ideas Michelle shares what led her to research retirement and write her book; how identity can make retirement challenging for some people; and what factors influence the timing of when people in different professions are ready to retire. We also discuss how ageism is costing organizations and societies across the world. We close with her recommendations on preparing for retirement. based on her research. She shares valuable tips that if you're planning for a transition to retirement you'll keep top of mind. Wise Quotes: "In my book, I explained that a fundamental tension exists between the autonomy, and flexibility, and the lack of boundaries that are associated with retirement and our instincts to maintain structure, a sense of social connection and personal fulfillment. I explained and I argued that retirement has been socially constructed in a way that can give rise to feelings of great discontentment as it stymies some things in favor of others. The people that I interviewed, they struggled with that tension. Some reconcile that by drawing themselves into new ways of recalibrating their identity." "I do write about people who were discontented, who experienced really dark points in their life, but it's important to recognize that there is a positivity effect available. If we can just take stock and get rid of the excess and focus in on what's positive in our life, I think that is going to be a good thing to keep in mind. The other two, I'll just quickly share are the idea of practicing of preparing for the transition. Like many of us, we don't take lunch breaks, work all through our adulthood, literally eat at the computer. I'm not saying you have to go for a walk every day at lunch. I'm saying that if you're planning to retire at a certain point, then prepare for the transition." For more on Michelle Pannor Silver: Please visit her website Read Michelle’s book Retirement and Its Discontents Commentary on her book: University of Chicago Magazine Spring ’19: When what you do is no longer who you are Times of London Literary Review Our review of Michelle's book Bio: Michelle Pannor Silver is an Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto with joint appointments in the Department of Sociology and the Interdisciplinary Centre for Health and Society (ICHS).Dr. Silver’s primary areas of research include: 1)Work, Aging, and Retirement; 2) Health Information Seeking; and 3) Perceptions about Aging and Health. Her book, Retirement and Its Discontents, was published in 2018 by Columbia University Press. Dr. Silver holds cross appointments in theDalla Lana School of Public Health/IHPME and the Institute for Life Course and Agingat the University of Toronto. Her research has been supported by grants from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), the Connaught New Researcher Award, the Mitacs Accelerate Program, the UTSC Research Competitiveness Fund, and the Healthcare of Ontario Pension Plan. She received a BA, BS, and MPP from the University of California, Berkeley and a PhD from the University of Chicago.   If you love your work, you'll need to be better prepared for the transition to retirement. A discussion with the author of Retirement and It's DiscontentsClick To Tweet   Want to Ace Your Retirement? Learning how to retire well goes well beyond your 401(k). Get wise about the non-financial side of retirement. Sign up for our free monthly newsletter Wisdom Notes     How do you prepare for retirement when you love what you do? It’s especially hard when your work has become who you are.

In this episode we talk with Michelle Pannor Silver, of The University of Toronto, author of Retirement and Its Discontents: Why We Won’t Stop Working, Even if We Can.

 

Prepare for Your Retirement Transition with Research-based Ideas

Michelle shares what led her to research retirement and write her book; how identity can make retirement challenging for some people; and what factors influence the timing of when people in different professions are ready to retire. We also discuss how ageism is costing organizations and societies across the world. We close with her recommendations on preparing for retirement. based on her research. She shares valuable tips that if you’re planning for a transition to retirement you’ll keep top of mind.

Wise Quotes:

“In my book, I explained that a fundamental tension exists between the autonomy, and flexibility, and the lack of boundaries that are associated with retirement and our instincts to maintain structure, a sense of social connection and personal fulfillment. I explained and I argued that retirement has been socially constructed in a way that can give rise to feelings of great discontentment as it stymies some things in favor of others. The people that I interviewed, they struggled with that tension. Some reconcile that by drawing themselves into new ways of recalibrating their identity.”

“I do write about people who were discontented, who experienced really dark points in their life, but it’s important to recognize that there is a positivity effect available. If we can just take stock and get rid of the excess and focus in on what’s positive in our life, I think that is going to be a good thing to keep in mind. The other two, I’ll just quickly share are the idea of practicing of preparing for the transition. Like many of us, we don’t take lunch breaks, work all through our adulthood, literally eat at the computer. I’m not saying you have to go for a walk every day at lunch. I’m saying that if you’re planning to retire at a certain point, then prepare for the transition.”

For more on Michelle Pannor Silver:

Please visit her website

Read Michelle’s book Retirement and Its Discontents

Commentary on her book:

University of Chicago Magazine Spring ’19: When what you do is no longer who you are

Times of London Literary Review

Our review of Michelle’s book

Bio:

Michelle Pannor Silver is an Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto with joint appointments in the Department of Sociology and the Interdisciplinary Centre for Health and Society (ICHS).Dr. Silver’s primary areas of research include: 1)Work, Aging, and Retirement; 2) Health Information Seeking; and 3) Perceptions about Aging and Health.

Her book, Retirement and Its Discontents, was published in 2018 by Columbia University Press. Dr. Silver holds cross appointments in theDalla Lana School of Public Health/IHPME and the Institute for Life Course and Agingat the University of Toronto. Her research has been supported by grants from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), the Connaught New Researcher Award, the Mitacs Accelerate Program, the UTSC Research Competitiveness Fund, and the Healthcare of Ontario Pension Plan.

She received a BA, BS, and MPP from the University of California, Berkeley and a PhD from the University of Chicago.

 


If you love your work, you'll need to be better prepared for the transition to retirement. A discussion with the author of Retirement and It's Discontents
Click To Tweet



 

Want to Ace Your Retirement?

Learning how to retire well goes well beyond your 401(k). Get wise about the non-financial side of retirement.

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How do you prepare for retirement when you love what you do? It's especially hard when your work has become who you are. - In this episode we talk with Michelle Pannor Silver, of The University of Toronto, How do you prepare for retirement when you love what you do? It's especially hard when your work has become who you are.<br /> <br /> In this episode we talk with Michelle Pannor Silver, of The University of Toronto, author of Retirement and Its Discontents: Why We Won't Stop Working, Even if We Can.<br /> <br />  <br /> Prepare for Your Retirement Transition with Research-based Ideas<br /> Michelle shares what led her to research retirement and write her book; how identity can make retirement challenging for some people; and what factors influence the timing of when people in different professions are ready to retire. We also discuss how ageism is costing organizations and societies across the world. We close with her recommendations on preparing for retirement. based on her research. She shares valuable tips that if you're planning for a transition to retirement you'll keep top of mind.<br /> <br /> Wise Quotes:<br /> "In my book, I explained that a fundamental tension exists between the autonomy, and flexibility, and the lack of boundaries that are associated with retirement and our instincts to maintain structure, a sense of social connection and personal fulfillment. I explained and I argued that retirement has been socially constructed in a way that can give rise to feelings of great discontentment as it stymies some things in favor of others. The people that I interviewed, they struggled with that tension. Some reconcile that by drawing themselves into new ways of recalibrating their identity."<br /> <br /> "I do write about people who were discontented, who experienced really dark points in their life, but it's important to recognize that there is a positivity effect available. If we can just take stock and get rid of the excess and focus in on what's positive in our life, I think that is going to be a good thing to keep in mind. The other two, I'll just quickly share are the idea of practicing of preparing for the transition. Like many of us, we don't take lunch breaks, work all through our adulthood, literally eat at the computer. I'm not saying you have to go for a walk every day at lunch. I'm saying that if you're planning to retire at a certain point, then prepare for the transition."<br /> <br /> For more on Michelle Pannor Silver:<br /> Please visit her website<br /> <br /> Read Michelle’s book Retirement and Its Discontents<br /> <br /> Commentary on her book:<br /> <br /> University of Chicago Magazine Spring ’19: When what you do is no longer who you are<br /> <br /> Times of London Literary Review<br /> Our review of Michelle's book<br /> Bio:<br /> Michelle Pannor Silver is an Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto with joint appointments in the Department of Sociology and the Interdisciplinary Centre for Health and Society (ICHS).Dr. Silver’s primary areas of research include: 1)Work, Aging, and Retirement; 2) Health Information Seeking; and 3) Perceptions about Aging and Health.<br /> <br /> Her book, Retirement and Its Discontents, was published in 2018 by Columbia University Press. Dr. Silver holds cross appointments in theDalla Lana School of Public Health/IHPME and the Institute for Life Course and Agingat the University of Toronto. Her research has been supported by grants from the Social Science and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC), the Connaught New Researcher Award, the Mitacs Accelerate Program, the UTSC Research Competitiveness Fund, and the Healthcare of Ontario Pension Plan.<br /> <br /> She received a BA, BS, and MPP from the University of California, Berkeley and a PhD from the University of Chicago.<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> If you love your work, you'll need to be better prepared for the transition to retirement. A discussion with the author of Retirement and It's DiscontentsClick To Tweet<br /> <br /> <br /> <br />  <br /> Want to Ace Your Retirement?<br /> Learning how to retire well goes well beyond your 401(k). Retirement Wisdom clean 54:48
Listen to Your Inner Voice. It Could be Your Wake-Up Call – Richard Losciale https://www.retirementwisdom.com/inner-voice-wakeup-call-podcast/ Wed, 01 May 2019 17:31:48 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=11305 Welcome to the third episode of our Noteworthy Series, where we highlight an article that we think warrants your attention and host a conversation with a relevant guest. Today’s article is The Power of Wakeup Calls by Gregg Levoy (Psychology Today – July 2017). Our guest is Richard Losciale, who experienced his own personal wake-up call that changed the way he lived his life – from being focused on the aspirational to being focused on the inspirational.  As Rich listened to his inner little voice, he worked hard to recover from being near death and transformed his life by shifting his mindset to his higher purpose and developed a stronger sense of who he is. His company, Neo-Seniors Services LLC, focuses on improving the well-being and mindfulness of those who are looking to optimize their senior years and live better lives. A Wake-Up Call leads to big life changes - and a shift to helping others.Click To Tweet You can learn more about Richard Losciale: Neo-Seniors Services LLC  website   Subscribe to Our Podcast Our podcast is a free Retirement School on the non-financial side of retirement. Don’t miss an episode. Subscribe today to have our conversations with authors, experts and interesting retirees come directly to you twice a month. Like our podcast? The best way to support our podcast is to take a minute and rate us on Apple Podcasts. Have any suggestions on how we can improve our podcast? Please let us know at  joec@retirementwisdom.com Welcome to the third episode of our Noteworthy Series, where we highlight an article that we think warrants your attention and host a conversation with a relevant guest.

Today’s article is The Power of Wakeup Calls by Gregg Levoy (Psychology Today – July 2017).

Our guest is Richard Losciale, who experienced his own personal wake-up call that changed the way he lived his life – from being focused on the aspirational to being focused on the inspirational.  As Rich listened to his inner little voice, he worked hard to recover from being near death and transformed his life by shifting his mindset to his higher purpose and developed a stronger sense of who he is. His company, Neo-Seniors Services LLC, focuses on improving the well-being and mindfulness of those who are looking to optimize their senior years and live better lives.


A Wake-Up Call leads to big life changes - and a shift to helping others.
Click To Tweet


You can learn more about Richard Losciale:

Neo-Seniors Services LLC  website

 


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Our podcast is a free Retirement School on the non-financial side of retirement. Don’t miss an episode.

Subscribe today to have our conversations with authors, experts and interesting retirees come directly to you twice a month.

Like our podcast?

The best way to support our podcast is to take a minute and rate us on Apple Podcasts.

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Welcome to the third episode of our Noteworthy Series, where we highlight an article that we think warrants your attention and host a conversation with a relevant guest. - Today’s article is The Power of Wakeup Calls by Gregg Levoy (Psychology Today –... Welcome to the third episode of our Noteworthy Series, where we highlight an article that we think warrants your attention and host a conversation with a relevant guest.<br /> <br /> Today’s article is The Power of Wakeup Calls by Gregg Levoy (Psychology Today – July 2017).<br /> <br /> Our guest is Richard Losciale, who experienced his own personal wake-up call that changed the way he lived his life – from being focused on the aspirational to being focused on the inspirational.  As Rich listened to his inner little voice, he worked hard to recover from being near death and transformed his life by shifting his mindset to his higher purpose and developed a stronger sense of who he is. His company, Neo-Seniors Services LLC, focuses on improving the well-being and mindfulness of those who are looking to optimize their senior years and live better lives.<br /> <br /> A Wake-Up Call leads to big life changes - and a shift to helping others.Click To Tweet<br /> <br /> You can learn more about Richard Losciale:<br /> <br /> Neo-Seniors Services LLC  website<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Subscribe to Our Podcast<br /> <br /> Our podcast is a free Retirement School on the non-financial side of retirement. Don’t miss an episode.<br /> <br /> Subscribe today to have our conversations with authors, experts and interesting retirees come directly to you twice a month.<br /> <br /> Like our podcast? <br /> <br /> The best way to support our podcast is to take a minute and rate us on Apple Podcasts.<br /> <br /> Have any suggestions on how we can improve our podcast? Please let us know at  joec@retirementwisdom.com Retirement Wisdom clean 32:59
What Will You Do When You’re Formerly Corporate? – Lorette Pruden https://www.retirementwisdom.com/formerly-corporate-retirement-podcast/ Wed, 17 Apr 2019 20:23:33 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=11140 Forced retirement is a challenging experience but it can open up new possibilities you may not have otherwise considered. Join us as we discuss making the transition from corporate life to entrepreneurship with Lorette Pruden, Ph.D., a chemical engineer turned Business Coach and Advisor. Lorette shares insights and advice from her own transition and her work with her clients, how to avoid common mistakes, how to leverage a virtual organization and why it takes a different mindset to win as a business owner. Wise Quote: "(There's) another formerly corporate outlook that gets people in trouble, which is, "I know what it takes to win." You might know what it takes to win the game that you used to be playing, but now you're playing a different game. One of the things the new business owner has to figure out is what game they are playing. Is it chess or is it checkers? It's the same board, but you need to know. There are bigger risks if you're playing chess than if you're playing checkers, right? Is it cricket or is it baseball? What are the rules? Why is it different? It looks kind of similar, but it turns out it's not, so there's some learning, a pretty steep learning curve, to figure out what is the game that you're playing."   No matter how well you're doing, let's face it your corporate days are numbered. What's next? The author of Formerly Corporate has some ideas and advice.Click To Tweet For more on Lorette Pruden, Ph.D.: Lorette’s website Follow on Facebook Lorette’s book Formerly Corporate: Mindset Shifts for Success in Your Own Business Bio: Lorette Pruden, Ph.D., has helped hundreds of small business owners, sales professionals, entrepreneurs and community leaders grow their businesses and manage that growth since 2000. She specializes in the Formerly Corporate—so many small business owners who’ve worked with her come from a corporate background that she finally wrote the book on it. How does she help? Working one-on-one or in one of her business growth teams, Lorette delivers strategies that work, focus and structure, collaborative teams, and accountability. She is a Princeton chemical engineer turned entrepreneur, who works at the intersection of business and people processes. Her career spans three (so far) phases: Chemistry—what is that? Chemical engineering—how does it work? and People—who’s going to make it happen? Lorette consults, trains, coaches and inspires her clients to Create strategic alliances and referral partnerships Create a customized system of cultivating continuous referrals Tap the collective wisdom of the mastermind team Develop a business that is self-sufficient and Produce enough profitable business to support the life they want to live. Lorette was President of the National Speakers Association, NJ 2010-11, and has served on the Boards of the Institute for Management Consultants NJ, the NJ Youth Symphony, and the NJ Council for Farmers and Communities. She is a BNI member, and has run the Montgomery Friends of Open Space Farmers Market since 2003.   Subscribe to Our Podcast The Retirement Conversation is a free Retirement School on the non-financial side of retirement. Don’t miss an episode. Subscribe today to have our conversations with authors, experts and interesting retirees come directly to you. Enjoying our podcast? Please take a minute and post a review on Apple Podcasts. We appreciate it. Have a topic you’d like us to cover? Suggestions are always welcome at joec@retirementwisdom.com Forced retirement is a challenging experience but it can open up new possibilities you may not have otherwise considered.

Join us as we discuss making the transition from corporate life to entrepreneurship with Lorette Pruden, Ph.D., a chemical engineer turned Business Coach and Advisor.

Lorette shares insights and advice from her own transition and her work with her clients, how to avoid common mistakes, how to leverage a virtual organization and why it takes a different mindset to win as a business owner.

Wise Quote:

“(There’s) another formerly corporate outlook that gets people in trouble, which is, “I know what it takes to win.” You might know what it takes to win the game that you used to be playing, but now you’re playing a different game.

One of the things the new business owner has to figure out is what game they are playing. Is it chess or is it checkers? It’s the same board, but you need to know. There are bigger risks if you’re playing chess than if you’re playing checkers, right? Is it cricket or is it baseball? What are the rules? Why is it different? It looks kind of similar, but it turns out it’s not, so there’s some learning, a pretty steep learning curve, to figure out what is the game that you’re playing.”

 


No matter how well you're doing, let's face it your corporate days are numbered. What's next? The author of Formerly Corporate has some ideas and advice.
Click To Tweet


For more on Lorette Pruden, Ph.D.:

Lorette’s website

Follow on Facebook

Lorette’s book Formerly Corporate: Mindset Shifts for Success in Your Own Business

Bio:

Lorette Pruden, Ph.D., has helped hundreds of small business owners, sales professionals, entrepreneurs and community leaders grow their businesses and manage that growth since 2000. She specializes in the Formerly Corporate—so many small business owners who’ve worked with her come from a corporate background that she finally wrote the book on it.

How does she help? Working one-on-one or in one of her business growth teams, Lorette delivers strategies that work, focus and structure, collaborative teams, and accountability. She is a Princeton chemical engineer turned entrepreneur, who works at the intersection of business and people processes. Her career spans three (so far) phases:

  • Chemistry—what is that?
  • Chemical engineering—how does it work? and
  • People—who’s going to make it happen?

Lorette consults, trains, coaches and inspires her clients to

  • Create strategic alliances and referral partnerships
  • Create a customized system of cultivating continuous referrals
  • Tap the collective wisdom of the mastermind team
  • Develop a business that is self-sufficient and
  • Produce enough profitable business to support the life they want to live.

Lorette was President of the National Speakers Association, NJ 2010-11, and has served on the Boards of the Institute for Management Consultants NJ, the NJ Youth Symphony, and the NJ Council for Farmers and Communities. She is a BNI member, and has run the Montgomery Friends of Open Space Farmers Market since 2003.

 


Subscribe to Our Podcast

The Retirement Conversation is a free Retirement School on the non-financial side of retirement.

Don’t miss an episode. Subscribe today to have our conversations with authors, experts and interesting retirees come directly to you.

Enjoying our podcast?

Please take a minute and post a review on Apple Podcasts. We appreciate it.

Have a topic you’d like us to cover?

Suggestions are always welcome at joec@retirementwisdom.com

]]>
Forced retirement is a challenging experience but it can open up new possibilities you may not have otherwise considered. - Join us as we discuss making the transition from corporate life to entrepreneurship with Lorette Pruden, Ph.D., Forced retirement is a challenging experience but it can open up new possibilities you may not have otherwise considered.<br /> <br /> Join us as we discuss making the transition from corporate life to entrepreneurship with Lorette Pruden, Ph.D., a chemical engineer turned Business Coach and Advisor.<br /> <br /> Lorette shares insights and advice from her own transition and her work with her clients, how to avoid common mistakes, how to leverage a virtual organization and why it takes a different mindset to win as a business owner.<br /> <br /> Wise Quote:<br /> "(There's) another formerly corporate outlook that gets people in trouble, which is, "I know what it takes to win." You might know what it takes to win the game that you used to be playing, but now you're playing a different game.<br /> <br /> One of the things the new business owner has to figure out is what game they are playing. Is it chess or is it checkers? It's the same board, but you need to know. There are bigger risks if you're playing chess than if you're playing checkers, right? Is it cricket or is it baseball? What are the rules? Why is it different? It looks kind of similar, but it turns out it's not, so there's some learning, a pretty steep learning curve, to figure out what is the game that you're playing."<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> No matter how well you're doing, let's face it your corporate days are numbered. What's next? The author of Formerly Corporate has some ideas and advice.Click To Tweet<br /> For more on Lorette Pruden, Ph.D.:<br /> Lorette’s website<br /> <br /> Follow on Facebook<br /> <br /> Lorette’s book Formerly Corporate: Mindset Shifts for Success in Your Own Business<br /> Bio:<br /> Lorette Pruden, Ph.D., has helped hundreds of small business owners, sales professionals, entrepreneurs and community leaders grow their businesses and manage that growth since 2000. She specializes in the Formerly Corporate—so many small business owners who’ve worked with her come from a corporate background that she finally wrote the book on it.<br /> <br /> How does she help? Working one-on-one or in one of her business growth teams, Lorette delivers strategies that work, focus and structure, collaborative teams, and accountability. She is a Princeton chemical engineer turned entrepreneur, who works at the intersection of business and people processes. Her career spans three (so far) phases:<br /> <br /> Chemistry—what is that?<br /> Chemical engineering—how does it work? and<br /> People—who’s going to make it happen?<br /> <br /> Lorette consults, trains, coaches and inspires her clients to<br /> <br /> Create strategic alliances and referral partnerships<br /> Create a customized system of cultivating continuous referrals<br /> Tap the collective wisdom of the mastermind team<br /> Develop a business that is self-sufficient and<br /> Produce enough profitable business to support the life they want to live.<br /> <br /> Lorette was President of the National Speakers Association, NJ 2010-11, and has served on the Boards of the Institute for Management Consultants NJ, the NJ Youth Symphony, and the NJ Council for Farmers and Communities. She is a BNI member, and has run the Montgomery Friends of Open Space Farmers Market since 2003.<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Subscribe to Our Podcast<br /> <br /> The Retirement Conversation is a free Retirement School on the non-financial side of retirement.<br /> <br /> Don’t miss an episode. Subscribe today to have our conversations with authors, experts and interesting retirees come directly to you.<br /> <br /> Enjoying our podcast? <br /> <br /> Please take a minute and post a review on Apple Podcasts. We appreciate it.<br /> <br /> Have a topic you’d like us to cover? <br /> <br /> Suggestions are always welcome at joec@retirementwisdom.com Retirement Wisdom clean 34:41
You Can Learn a Lot from the Principles of FIRE – Chris Mamula https://www.retirementwisdom.com/how-to-retire-early-podcast/ Mon, 08 Apr 2019 13:52:20 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=11131 There’s a lot of chatter about the FIRE movement. Chris Mamula, who retired at 41, joins us to discuss his journey to early retirement, the upsides and the challenges of FIRE, why the transition can be challenging and his advice on what it takes to retire early. You've nailed the numbers. You can retire early. But are you prepared for the transition? Chris Mamula shares his experience and advice.Click To Tweet Follow Chris at  Can I Retire Yet? Chris’ article in MarketWatch: This first year of early retirement has been one of the hardest of my life   Want to Ace Your Retirement? Learning how to retire well goes well beyond your 401(k). Get wise about the non-financial side of retirement. Schedule a Free Consultation to discuss how we can help you balance your retirement planning so you’ll be truly well-prepared. There’s a lot of chatter about the FIRE movement. Chris Mamula, who retired at 41, joins us to discuss his journey to early retirement, the upsides and the challenges of FIRE, why the transition can be challenging and his advice on what it takes to retire early.


You've nailed the numbers. You can retire early. But are you prepared for the transition? Chris Mamula shares his experience and advice.
Click To Tweet


Follow Chris at  Can I Retire Yet?

Chris’ article in MarketWatch:

This first year of early retirement has been one of the hardest of my life

 


Want to Ace Your Retirement?

Learning how to retire well goes well beyond your 401(k).

Get wise about the non-financial side of retirement.

Schedule a Free Consultation to discuss how we can help you balance your retirement planning so you’ll be truly well-prepared.

]]>
There’s a lot of chatter about the FIRE movement. Chris Mamula, who retired at 41, joins us to discuss his journey to early retirement, the upsides and the challenges of FIRE, why the transition can be challenging and his advice on what it takes to ret... There’s a lot of chatter about the FIRE movement. Chris Mamula, who retired at 41, joins us to discuss his journey to early retirement, the upsides and the challenges of FIRE, why the transition can be challenging and his advice on what it takes to retire early.<br /> <br /> You've nailed the numbers. You can retire early. But are you prepared for the transition? Chris Mamula shares his experience and advice.Click To Tweet<br /> <br /> Follow Chris at  Can I Retire Yet?<br /> <br /> Chris’ article in MarketWatch:<br /> <br /> This first year of early retirement has been one of the hardest of my life<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Want to Ace Your Retirement?<br /> <br /> Learning how to retire well goes well beyond your 401(k).<br /> <br /> Get wise about the non-financial side of retirement.<br /> <br /> Schedule a Free Consultation to discuss how we can help you balance your retirement planning so you’ll be truly well-prepared. Retirement Wisdom clean 22:42
We’re All Ageing. Are You Up for a Bolder Approach? – Carl Honore’ https://www.retirementwisdom.com/ageing-bolder-approach/ Mon, 25 Mar 2019 21:40:55 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=11125 Positive aging takes a different mindset - and a bolder one. Carl Honore’ is an award-winning journalist and author whose revolutionary first book, In Praise of Slowness, was an international bestseller and has been published in more than thirty languages. This excellent book can help you reframe how you think about getting older, learn how to retire well and enjoy life to its fullest. Carl joins our retirement podcast from London to discuss the benefits positive aging,  living more slowly against the cultural pressures for speed and youth - and his new book (B)OLDER: Making the Most of Our Longer Lives. Wise Quotes: On the Advantages Older Workers Bring "I think is quite surprising to people that - actually - in the workplace, people get more productive as they get older. There's this awful toxic ageism -  especially in the American workplace.  But I think you find it all over the world too, this idea in Silicon Valley that they talk about being finished at forty, and anybody over forty gets passed over for interviews and shunted into less interesting work, and all this sort of stuff. Yet, people are on an upward curve performance as they grow older. Productivity goes up in jobs that rely on social skills. People get better at dealing with customers and clients, better at things like collaboration, listening, seeing the big picture, creativity holds strong, and there's a lot of research in fact that suggests that it gets better, we become more creative as we get older. We loosen up. We join the dots better."   On the Power of Language and Aging "I think so much of the problem with our attitude with aging is bound up with the poisonous language we use. It's woven into our vernacular, that younger is better and older is worse. When we forget something we call it a senior moment. Or we use that phrase finished at forty, or your the wrong side of thirty or the wrong side of forty, or you say you're feeling your age and that means you feel weak and feeble and inferior or sore. It's just, every time we use that language, I think it's reinforcing that stereotype. It's reinforcing the caricature. It's reinforcing the wrong idea of aging. As we know from whether dealing with racism or sexism or any kind of social change, language is one the first steps towards changing how we feel about ourselves and our place in the world and changing how we behave is the words we use. So I just recommend to people just push pause, think a little bit, check your language a little bit. Just don't use phrases like a senior moment. Try and use phrases that are kind of neutral about aging, or upbeat about it. I think that can make a difference. There's a lot of studies that show that if you have an upbeat view of aging you age better. You live longer, you better physically, cognitively, happier, et cetera. So language is a good way I think to do that."   More on Carl Honoré Carl’s New Book:(B)OLDER is available on Amazon Check out Carl Honore’s 12 Rules for Ageing Boldly Carl’s Website Bio: Carl Honoré is a bestselling author, broadcaster and leader of the global Slow Movement. His TED talk on the benefits of slowing down has been viewed 2.8 million times. Described by the Wall Street Journal as “an in-demand spokesman on slowness,” Carl travels the world to deliver powerful keynotes that put time and tempo in a whole new light. His message is simple but counterintuitive: To achieve peak performance in a fast world, you have to slow down. After studying history and Italian at Edinburgh University, Honoré worked with street children in Brazil. This inspired him to take up journalism. He has written from all over Europe and South America, spending three years in Buenos Aires along the way. His work has appeared in publications on both sides of the Atlantic, including The Economist, Observer, Miami Herald, Houston Chronicle, Time, National Post and other publications. Carl’s first book, In Praise of Slow, Positive aging takes a different mindset – and a bolder one.

Carl Honore’ is an award-winning journalist and author whose revolutionary first book, In Praise of Slowness, was an international bestseller and has been published in more than thirty languages. This excellent book can help you reframe how you think about getting older, learn how to retire well and enjoy life to its fullest.

Carl joins our retirement podcast from London to discuss the benefits positive aging,  living more slowly against the cultural pressures for speed and youth – and his new book (B)OLDER: Making the Most of Our Longer Lives.

Wise Quotes:

On the Advantages Older Workers Bring

“I think is quite surprising to people that – actually – in the workplace, people get more productive as they get older. There’s this awful toxic ageism –  especially in the American workplace.  But I think you find it all over the world too, this idea in Silicon Valley that they talk about being finished at forty, and anybody over forty gets passed over for interviews and shunted into less interesting work, and all this sort of stuff. Yet, people are on an upward curve performance as they grow older. Productivity goes up in jobs that rely on social skills. People get better at dealing with customers and clients, better at things like collaboration, listening, seeing the big picture, creativity holds strong, and there’s a lot of research in fact that suggests that it gets better, we become more creative as we get older. We loosen up. We join the dots better.”

 

On the Power of Language and Aging

“I think so much of the problem with our attitude with aging is bound up with the poisonous language we use. It’s woven into our vernacular, that younger is better and older is worse. When we forget something we call it a senior moment. Or we use that phrase finished at forty, or your the wrong side of thirty or the wrong side of forty, or you say you’re feeling your age and that means you feel weak and feeble and inferior or sore. It’s just, every time we use that language, I think it’s reinforcing that stereotype. It’s reinforcing the caricature. It’s reinforcing the wrong idea of aging.

As we know from whether dealing with racism or sexism or any kind of social change, language is one the first steps towards changing how we feel about ourselves and our place in the world and changing how we behave is the words we use. So I just recommend to people just push pause, think a little bit, check your language a little bit. Just don’t use phrases like a senior moment. Try and use phrases that are kind of neutral about aging, or upbeat about it. I think that can make a difference. There’s a lot of studies that show that if you have an upbeat view of aging you age better. You live longer, you better physically, cognitively, happier, et cetera. So language is a good way I think to do that.”

 

More on Carl Honoré

Carl’s New Book:(B)OLDER is available on Amazon

Check out Carl Honore’s 12 Rules for Ageing Boldly

Carl’s Website

Bio:

Carl Honoré is a bestselling author, broadcaster and leader of the global Slow Movement. His TED talk on the benefits of slowing down has been viewed 2.8 million times. Described by the Wall Street Journal as “an in-demand spokesman on slowness,” Carl travels the world to deliver powerful keynotes that put time and tempo in a whole new light. His message is simple but counterintuitive: To achieve peak performance in a fast world, you have to slow down.
After studying history and Italian at Edinburgh University, Honoré worked with street children in Brazil. This inspired him to take up journalism. He has written from all over Europe and South America, spending three years in Buenos Aires along the way. His work has appeared in publications on both sides of the Atlantic, including The Economist, Observer, Miami Herald, Houston Chronicle, Time, National Post and other publications.
Carl’s first book, In Praise of Slow, chronicles the global trend toward putting on the brakes in everything from work to food to parenting. Under Pressure explores how to raise children in a fast world and was hailed by Time as a “gospel of the Slow Parenting movement.” Carl’s third book, The Slow Fix ,shows how to tackle complex problems in every walk of life without falling for short-term quick fixes. Published in 34 languages, his books have landed on bestseller lists in many countries.
Carl was featured in a series for BBC Radio 4 called The Slow Coaching which he helped frazzled, over-scheduled people slow down. He also presented a television show called Frantic Family Rescueon Australia’s ABC 1. Carl is an advisor to Jack Media, which makes messaging apps, and sits on the Board of Trustees of Hewitt School in New York City.
Carl’s latest book is Bolder: Making The Most Of Our Longer Lives. It is about ageing –how we can do it better and feel better about doing it. It’s also a rallying cry against the last form of discrimination that dare speak its name: ageism.
Carl lives in London. While researching his first book on slowness he was slapped with a speeding ticket.

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Positive aging takes a different mindset - and a bolder one. - Carl Honore’ is an award-winning journalist and author whose revolutionary first book, In Praise of Slowness, was an international bestseller and has been published in more than thirty lan... Positive aging takes a different mindset - and a bolder one.<br /> <br /> Carl Honore’ is an award-winning journalist and author whose revolutionary first book, In Praise of Slowness, was an international bestseller and has been published in more than thirty languages. This excellent book can help you reframe how you think about getting older, learn how to retire well and enjoy life to its fullest.<br /> <br /> Carl joins our retirement podcast from London to discuss the benefits positive aging,  living more slowly against the cultural pressures for speed and youth - and his new book (B)OLDER: Making the Most of Our Longer Lives.<br /> <br /> Wise Quotes:<br /> On the Advantages Older Workers Bring<br /> <br /> "I think is quite surprising to people that - actually - in the workplace, people get more productive as they get older. There's this awful toxic ageism -  especially in the American workplace.  But I think you find it all over the world too, this idea in Silicon Valley that they talk about being finished at forty, and anybody over forty gets passed over for interviews and shunted into less interesting work, and all this sort of stuff. Yet, people are on an upward curve performance as they grow older. Productivity goes up in jobs that rely on social skills. People get better at dealing with customers and clients, better at things like collaboration, listening, seeing the big picture, creativity holds strong, and there's a lot of research in fact that suggests that it gets better, we become more creative as we get older. We loosen up. We join the dots better."<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> On the Power of Language and Aging<br /> <br /> "I think so much of the problem with our attitude with aging is bound up with the poisonous language we use. It's woven into our vernacular, that younger is better and older is worse. When we forget something we call it a senior moment. Or we use that phrase finished at forty, or your the wrong side of thirty or the wrong side of forty, or you say you're feeling your age and that means you feel weak and feeble and inferior or sore. It's just, every time we use that language, I think it's reinforcing that stereotype. It's reinforcing the caricature. It's reinforcing the wrong idea of aging.<br /> <br /> As we know from whether dealing with racism or sexism or any kind of social change, language is one the first steps towards changing how we feel about ourselves and our place in the world and changing how we behave is the words we use. So I just recommend to people just push pause, think a little bit, check your language a little bit. Just don't use phrases like a senior moment. Try and use phrases that are kind of neutral about aging, or upbeat about it. I think that can make a difference. There's a lot of studies that show that if you have an upbeat view of aging you age better. You live longer, you better physically, cognitively, happier, et cetera. So language is a good way I think to do that."<br /> <br />  <br /> More on Carl Honoré<br /> Carl’s New Book:(B)OLDER is available on Amazon<br /> <br /> Check out Carl Honore’s 12 Rules for Ageing Boldly<br /> <br /> Carl’s Website<br /> Bio:<br /> <br /> Carl Honoré is a bestselling author, broadcaster and leader of the global Slow Movement. His TED talk on the benefits of slowing down has been viewed 2.8 million times. Described by the Wall Street Journal as “an in-demand spokesman on slowness,” Carl travels the world to deliver powerful keynotes that put time and tempo in a whole new light. His message is simple but counterintuitive: To achieve peak performance in a fast world, you have to slow down.<br /> <br /> After studying history and Italian at Edinburgh University, Honoré worked with street children in Brazil. This inspired him to take up journalism. He has written from all over Europe and South America, spending three years in Buenos Aires along the way. Retirement Wisdom clean 30:18
The Exciting Potential of Intergenerational Mentoring – Charlotte Japp https://www.retirementwisdom.com/inter-generational-mentoring-podcast/ Fri, 15 Mar 2019 12:30:35 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=11116 Considering a career shift? Intergenerational mentoring can be a valuable resource. Tapping into the knowledge, experience, skills and networks of other generations can be mutually beneficial and expand your thinking. Career Shift? Learn from Other Generations Join us as we talk with Charlotte Japp, who was interviewed for the article on the innovative organization she’s founded (CIRKEL) on intergenerational mentoring. We learn more from Charlotte on what led her to create CIRKEL, how their events work and her vision for its future.   Wise Quote: "I was listening to a podcast where they were talking about ways to get to 3% GDP growth, and they were saying there was a labor shortage because Baby Boomers were being aged out of their jobs. Instead of plainly coming to the conclusion that we needed to keep Baby Boomers working, not only because they wanted to work, but because it was good for the economy. They kind of went down this tangent of, "Well, maybe we need to get more immigrants ... maybe robots will take these jobs ..." It was just so strange to me because the answer was there in plain sight. This is not just something that I want to have in the world that is normalized, intergenerational connections and bringing more older back to work, but we also need to do it if we want to be successful as a whole. There's kind of a two-sided answer, to why I created CIRKEL."   More on Charlotte Japp and CIRKEL CIRKEL website Sign up for CIRKEL’s newsletter to stay current and learn about upcoming events. Bio and Background: CIRKEL was founded by Charlotte Japp, a 27-year-old with a deep appreciation for her parents and other older, interesting people. Early in her career, Charlotte noticed a huge gap between the 20-somethings she worked with and baby boomers like her parents, who had decades of experience, but were forced to retire or start secondary careers due to ageist hiring trends. Her friends and colleagues wanted career mentorship and life advice, while her parents and their friends were looking for new skills and trend reports to stay relevant in their careers. Enter CIRKEL, an intergenerational platform to close that loop through speaker-led storytelling, intergenerational networking, and two-way mentorships. Charlotte is passionate about connecting people and believes there’s a big opportunity for doing so across generations.   Today's Article: The New 50s: Far From RetirementThe New York Times. Want to Ace Your Retirement? Learning how to retire well goes beyond your 401(k). Be wise about the non-financial side of retirement. There's a lot to think about and plan for in order to create a satisfying life in your retirement. Sign up for our free monthly newsletter Wisdom Notes. Like Our Retirement Podcast? Please take a moment and give our retirement podcast a rating on Apple Podcasts. Thank you.   Considering a career shift? Intergenerational mentoring can be a valuable resource. Tapping into the knowledge, experience, skills and networks of other generations can be mutually beneficial and expand your thinking.

Career Shift? Learn from Other Generations

Join us as we talk with Charlotte Japp, who was interviewed for the article on the innovative organization she’s founded (CIRKEL) on intergenerational mentoring.

We learn more from Charlotte on what led her to create CIRKEL, how their events work and her vision for its future.

 

Wise Quote:

“I was listening to a podcast where they were talking about ways to get to 3% GDP growth, and they were saying there was a labor shortage because Baby Boomers were being aged out of their jobs. Instead of plainly coming to the conclusion that we needed to keep Baby Boomers working, not only because they wanted to work, but because it was good for the economy. They kind of went down this tangent of, “Well, maybe we need to get more immigrants … maybe robots will take these jobs …” It was just so strange to me because the answer was there in plain sight. This is not just something that I want to have in the world that is normalized, intergenerational connections and bringing more older back to work, but we also need to do it if we want to be successful as a whole. There’s kind of a two-sided answer, to why I created CIRKEL.”

 

More on Charlotte Japp and CIRKEL

CIRKEL website

Sign up for CIRKEL’s newsletter to stay current and learn about upcoming events.

Bio and Background:

CIRKEL was founded by Charlotte Japp, a 27-year-old with a deep appreciation for her parents and other older, interesting people.

Early in her career, Charlotte noticed a huge gap between the 20-somethings she worked with and baby boomers like her parents, who had decades of experience, but were forced to retire or start secondary careers due to ageist hiring trends. Her friends and colleagues wanted career mentorship and life advice, while her parents and their friends were looking for new skills and trend reports to stay relevant in their careers.

Enter CIRKEL, an intergenerational platform to close that loop through speaker-led storytelling, intergenerational networking, and two-way mentorships.

Charlotte is passionate about connecting people and believes there’s a big opportunity for doing so across generations.

 

Today’s Article:

The New 50s: Far From RetirementThe New York Times.


Want to Ace Your Retirement?

Learning how to retire well goes beyond your 401(k).

Be wise about the non-financial side of retirement. There’s a lot to think about and plan for in order to create a satisfying life in your retirement. Sign up for our free monthly newsletter Wisdom Notes.

Like Our Retirement Podcast?

Please take a moment and give our retirement podcast a rating on Apple Podcasts. Thank you.

 

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Considering a career shift? Intergenerational mentoring can be a valuable resource. Tapping into the knowledge, experience, skills and networks of other generations can be mutually beneficial and expand your thinking. Career Shift? Considering a career shift? Intergenerational mentoring can be a valuable resource. Tapping into the knowledge, experience, skills and networks of other generations can be mutually beneficial and expand your thinking.<br /> Career Shift? Learn from Other Generations<br /> Join us as we talk with Charlotte Japp, who was interviewed for the article on the innovative organization she’s founded (CIRKEL) on intergenerational mentoring.<br /> <br /> We learn more from Charlotte on what led her to create CIRKEL, how their events work and her vision for its future.<br /> <br />  <br /> Wise Quote:<br /> "I was listening to a podcast where they were talking about ways to get to 3% GDP growth, and they were saying there was a labor shortage because Baby Boomers were being aged out of their jobs. Instead of plainly coming to the conclusion that we needed to keep Baby Boomers working, not only because they wanted to work, but because it was good for the economy. They kind of went down this tangent of, "Well, maybe we need to get more immigrants ... maybe robots will take these jobs ..." It was just so strange to me because the answer was there in plain sight. This is not just something that I want to have in the world that is normalized, intergenerational connections and bringing more older back to work, but we also need to do it if we want to be successful as a whole. There's kind of a two-sided answer, to why I created CIRKEL."<br /> <br />  <br /> More on Charlotte Japp and CIRKEL<br /> CIRKEL website <br /> <br /> Sign up for CIRKEL’s newsletter to stay current and learn about upcoming events.<br /> <br /> Bio and Background:<br /> CIRKEL was founded by Charlotte Japp, a 27-year-old with a deep appreciation for her parents and other older, interesting people.<br /> Early in her career, Charlotte noticed a huge gap between the 20-somethings she worked with and baby boomers like her parents, who had decades of experience, but were forced to retire or start secondary careers due to ageist hiring trends. Her friends and colleagues wanted career mentorship and life advice, while her parents and their friends were looking for new skills and trend reports to stay relevant in their careers.<br /> Enter CIRKEL, an intergenerational platform to close that loop through speaker-led storytelling, intergenerational networking, and two-way mentorships.<br /> Charlotte is passionate about connecting people and believes there’s a big opportunity for doing so across generations.<br />  <br /> <br /> Today's Article:<br /> <br /> The New 50s: Far From RetirementThe New York Times.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Want to Ace Your Retirement?<br /> Learning how to retire well goes beyond your 401(k).<br /> <br /> Be wise about the non-financial side of retirement. There's a lot to think about and plan for in order to create a satisfying life in your retirement. Sign up for our free monthly newsletter Wisdom Notes.<br /> <br /> Like Our Retirement Podcast?<br /> Please take a moment and give our retirement podcast a rating on Apple Podcasts. Thank you.<br /> <br />   Retirement Wisdom clean 28:36
What Will Your Retirement ‘Do-Over’ Be Like? – Paul Fox https://www.retirementwisdom.com/retirement-do-over-podcast/ Wed, 20 Feb 2019 15:41:06 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=11083 Welcome to the first episode of our new Noteworthy Series, where we highlight an article that we think warrants your attention. This series is in response to listener feedback on our retirement podcast. It’s a shorter piece on an article - and a conversation with a relevant guest. Today’s article is When Retirement Is a Bad Fit by Richard Eisenberg, Money & Work Editor at Next Avenue - October 17, 2018 They say that life doesn't give you many second chances. (Come to think of it, they say a lot of things.) But sometimes no matter what life gives you, you can make your own second chances. And more and more, people are come to view the phase of life we call retirement as a springboard for their own second chance at a career they'll love. People work very hard to be able to retire, savoring visions of a less stressful life along the way. The truth is that for some people, once they get there, find it ... boring. Join us as we talk with Paul Fox, owner of Philly Socks about his retirement story and his fun Second Act as an entrepreneur. You can learn more about Paul Fox here: His store: phillysocks.com Video Interview     Want to Ace Your Retirement? Learning how to retire well goes beyond your 401(k). Sign up for our free monthly newsletter Wisdom Notes Welcome to the first episode of our new Noteworthy Series, where we highlight an article that we think warrants your attention.

This series is in response to listener feedback on our retirement podcast. It’s a shorter piece on an article – and a conversation with a relevant guest.

Today’s article is When Retirement Is a Bad Fit by Richard Eisenberg, Money & Work Editor at Next Avenue – October 17, 2018

They say that life doesn’t give you many second chances. (Come to think of it, they say a lot of things.)

But sometimes no matter what life gives you, you can make your own second chances.

And more and more, people are come to view the phase of life we call retirement as a springboard for their own second chance at a career they’ll love.

People work very hard to be able to retire, savoring visions of a less stressful life along the way. The truth is that for some people, once they get there, find it … boring.

Join us as we talk with Paul Fox, owner of Philly Socks about his retirement story and his fun Second Act as an entrepreneur.

You can learn more about Paul Fox here:

His store: phillysocks.com

Video Interview

 


 

Want to Ace Your Retirement?

Learning how to retire well goes beyond your 401(k). Sign up for our free monthly newsletter Wisdom Notes

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Welcome to the first episode of our new Noteworthy Series, where we highlight an article that we think warrants your attention. - This series is in response to listener feedback on our retirement podcast. It’s a shorter piece on an article - and a con... Welcome to the first episode of our new Noteworthy Series, where we highlight an article that we think warrants your attention.<br /> <br /> This series is in response to listener feedback on our retirement podcast. It’s a shorter piece on an article - and a conversation with a relevant guest.<br /> <br /> Today’s article is When Retirement Is a Bad Fit by Richard Eisenberg, Money & Work Editor at Next Avenue - October 17, 2018<br /> <br /> They say that life doesn't give you many second chances. (Come to think of it, they say a lot of things.)<br /> <br /> But sometimes no matter what life gives you, you can make your own second chances.<br /> <br /> And more and more, people are come to view the phase of life we call retirement as a springboard for their own second chance at a career they'll love.<br /> <br /> People work very hard to be able to retire, savoring visions of a less stressful life along the way. The truth is that for some people, once they get there, find it ... boring.<br /> <br /> Join us as we talk with Paul Fox, owner of Philly Socks about his retirement story and his fun Second Act as an entrepreneur.<br /> <br /> You can learn more about Paul Fox here:<br /> <br /> His store: phillysocks.com<br /> <br /> Video Interview<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Want to Ace Your Retirement?<br /> <br /> Learning how to retire well goes beyond your 401(k). Sign up for our free monthly newsletter Wisdom Notes Retirement Wisdom clean 11:53
If You Plan on Working Longer, How Do You Best Prepare? – Kerry Hannon https://www.retirementwisdom.com/plan-working-longer-how-you-best-prepare-podcast/ Thu, 31 Jan 2019 16:21:15 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=11059 Working longer today often means navigating career transitions successfully. How can you be well-prepared? In this conversation on our retirement podcast, we are joined by Kerry Hannon, AARP’s Job Expert. Kerry is a national keynote speaker, best-selling author, and columnist on personal finance, career transitions, and retirement. Her latest books include Great Jobs for Everyone 50+ and What's Next? Finding Your Passion and Your Dream Job in Your Forties, Fifties and Beyond. Kerry is a contributor and columnist for The New York Times and she writes a weekly column for NextAvenue.org. Kerry shares her perspective and advice on: Interesting work options that people may not consider The key challenges workers over 50 face today with career transitions How to best prepare if you want to work longer What you should keep in mind if you’re planning a Second Act career Why becoming an entrepreneur is an attractive option for some people – and a few important cautions to be aware of How innovative employers are leveraging mature workers Her new book    Planning to work longer? You'll want to listen to Kerry Hannon's tips and advice.Click To Tweet   Wise Quotes: On Fitness Q. If someone wants to work longer and overcome those challenges, a big question I'm sure they're thinking about is, how can I best prepare? Could you please talk about the three-part fitness plan that you wrote about in your book, What's Next? Kerry Hannon: "Thank you for asking about that.  I love talking about Kerry's Fitness Plan. Number one, I'll go out and I'll speak to audiences of workers over 50, who really want to continue working. Often, I must be honest, I see the palpable fear in their eyes that they're worried they're going to outlive their money. They not only want to work, they need to work because they don't have enough saved for retirement with our longer lives and longevity. I will say, it's often women, come up to me and say, should I have Botox? Should I dye my hair? I say, no, no, no. You need to get physically fit. The number one piece of my fitness plan is to get physically fit. I don't mean running fast miles or bench pressing. What I'm talking about is a regular fitness program. A couple of times a week, 20 minutes. I walk my dog, but there are lots of things you could swim. Build that into your routine. Have a fitness regime, eat with an eye to nutrition and health. What happens, it's so amazing, when you're physically fit, you have this energy. You have this can-do spirit, this positivity. People want to be around you. They want you to be on their team. Hiring managers see that. They don't really necessarily recognize that's what it is, but they want you on their team. They love that energy. It goes a long way to fighting back that stereotype, that you're not up for the job. You don't have the energy or the stamina. In fact, you can just prove that wrong right there. The second piece of my program is to get financially fit. Now, this one's a little trickier, but what you need to do is, debt is a dream killer. At this stage in our life, if we want to find work that we really want to do. It's something that's going to energize us again, get us excited about work."   For More on Kerry Hannon: Kerry’s books mentioned in this episode: New: Never Too Old to Get Rich: The Entrepreneur's Guide to Starting a Business Mid-Life Great Jobs for Everyone 50 + What's Next? Finding Your Passion and Your Dream Job in Your Forties, Fifties and Beyond Never Too Old to Get Rich: The Entrepreneur's Guide to Starting a Business Mid-Life Kerry’s website   Bio: Kerry Hannon is a nationally recognized expert and strategist on career transitions, entrepreneurship, personal finance and retirement. She is a frequent TV and radio commentator and is a sought-after keynote speaker at conferences across the country. Kerry has dedicated her work to making a difference in p... Working longer today often means navigating career transitions successfully. How can you be well-prepared?

In this conversation on our retirement podcast, we are joined by Kerry Hannon, AARP’s Job Expert. Kerry is a national keynote speaker, best-selling author, and columnist on personal finance, career transitions, and retirement. Her latest books include Great Jobs for Everyone 50+ and What’s Next? Finding Your Passion and Your Dream Job in Your Forties, Fifties and Beyond. Kerry is a contributor and columnist for The New York Times and she writes a weekly column for NextAvenue.org.

Kerry shares her perspective and advice on:

  • Interesting work options that people may not consider
  • The key challenges workers over 50 face today with career transitions
  • How to best prepare if you want to work longer
  • What you should keep in mind if you’re planning a Second Act career
  • Why becoming an entrepreneur is an attractive option for some people – and a few important cautions to be aware of
  • How innovative employers are leveraging mature workers
  • Her new book 

 


Planning to work longer? You'll want to listen to Kerry Hannon's tips and advice.
Click To Tweet


 

Wise Quotes:

On Fitness

Q. If someone wants to work longer and overcome those challenges, a big question I’m sure they’re thinking about is, how can I best prepare? Could you please talk about the three-part fitness plan that you wrote about in your book, What’s Next?

Kerry Hannon: “Thank you for asking about that.  I love talking about Kerry’s Fitness Plan. Number one, I’ll go out and I’ll speak to audiences of workers over 50, who really want to continue working. Often, I must be honest, I see the palpable fear in their eyes that they’re worried they’re going to outlive their money. They not only want to work, they need to work because they don’t have enough saved for retirement with our longer lives and longevity. I will say, it’s often women, come up to me and say, should I have Botox? Should I dye my hair? I say, no, no, no. You need to get physically fit.

The number one piece of my fitness plan is to get physically fit. I don’t mean running fast miles or bench pressing. What I’m talking about is a regular fitness program. A couple of times a week, 20 minutes.

I walk my dog, but there are lots of things you could swim. Build that into your routine. Have a fitness regime, eat with an eye to nutrition and health. What happens, it’s so amazing, when you’re physically fit, you have this energy. You have this can-do spirit, this positivity. People want to be around you. They want you to be on their team. Hiring managers see that. They don’t really necessarily recognize that’s what it is, but they want you on their team. They love that energy. It goes a long way to fighting back that stereotype, that you’re not up for the job. You don’t have the energy or the stamina. In fact, you can just prove that wrong right there. The second piece of my program is to get financially fit. Now, this one’s a little trickier, but what you need to do is, debt is a dream killer. At this stage in our life, if we want to find work that we really want to do. It’s something that’s going to energize us again, get us excited about work.”

 

For More on Kerry Hannon:

Kerry’s books mentioned in this episode:

New: Never Too Old to Get Rich: The Entrepreneur’s Guide to Starting a Business Mid-Life

Great Jobs for Everyone 50 +

What’s Next? Finding Your Passion and Your Dream Job in Your Forties, Fifties and Beyond

Never Too Old to Get Rich: The Entrepreneur’s Guide to Starting a Business Mid-Life

Kerry’s website

 

Bio:

Kerry Hannon is a nationally recognized expert and strategist on career transitions, entrepreneurship, personal finance and retirement. She is a frequent TV and radio commentator and is a sought-after keynote speaker at conferences across the country.

Kerry has dedicated her work to making a difference in people’s lives, to give them confidence and the tools to succeed personally, professionally and financially. She offers her audiences and readers can-do expert advice on the best ways to empower themselves now and for the future.

She has spent more than two decades covering all aspects of careers, business and personal finance as a columnist, editor, and writer for the nation’s leading media companies, including The New York TimesForbes, Money, U.S. News & World Report, and USA Today.

Kerry’s work also regularly appeared in Kiplinger’s Personal Finance and The Wall Street Journal, among other national publications.

She has appeared as a career expert on The Dr Phil Show. She has also appeared as a career and financial expert on ABC News, CBS, CNBCNBC Nightly News, NPR, and PBS.

Kerry is the author of a dozen books, including Getting the Job You Want After 50, the award-winning Love Your Job: The New Rules for Career Happiness,(Wiley), which was the # 1 new release on Amazon, the GOLD Living Now Book Award for Personal Growth/Motivation winner, and What’s Next? Finding Your Passion and Your Dream Job in Your Forties, Fifties and Beyond 

 

Related Podcasts:

 

https://www.retirementwisdom.com/will-you-be-an-entrepreneur-in-your-second-act-podcast/

 

https://www.retirementwisdom.com/how-can-you-be-better-with-age-podcast/

 

 


 

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Working longer today often means navigating career transitions successfully. How can you be well-prepared? - In this conversation on our retirement podcast, we are joined by Kerry Hannon, AARP’s Job Expert. Kerry is a national keynote speaker, Working longer today often means navigating career transitions successfully. How can you be well-prepared?<br /> <br /> In this conversation on our retirement podcast, we are joined by Kerry Hannon, AARP’s Job Expert. Kerry is a national keynote speaker, best-selling author, and columnist on personal finance, career transitions, and retirement. Her latest books include Great Jobs for Everyone 50+ and What's Next? Finding Your Passion and Your Dream Job in Your Forties, Fifties and Beyond. Kerry is a contributor and columnist for The New York Times and she writes a weekly column for NextAvenue.org.<br /> <br /> Kerry shares her perspective and advice on:<br /> <br /> Interesting work options that people may not consider<br /> The key challenges workers over 50 face today with career transitions<br /> How to best prepare if you want to work longer<br /> What you should keep in mind if you’re planning a Second Act career<br /> Why becoming an entrepreneur is an attractive option for some people – and a few important cautions to be aware of<br /> How innovative employers are leveraging mature workers<br /> Her new book <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Planning to work longer? You'll want to listen to Kerry Hannon's tips and advice.Click To Tweet<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Wise Quotes:<br /> <br /> On Fitness<br /> <br /> Q. If someone wants to work longer and overcome those challenges, a big question I'm sure they're thinking about is, how can I best prepare? Could you please talk about the three-part fitness plan that you wrote about in your book, What's Next?<br /> <br /> Kerry Hannon: "Thank you for asking about that.  I love talking about Kerry's Fitness Plan. Number one, I'll go out and I'll speak to audiences of workers over 50, who really want to continue working. Often, I must be honest, I see the palpable fear in their eyes that they're worried they're going to outlive their money. They not only want to work, they need to work because they don't have enough saved for retirement with our longer lives and longevity. I will say, it's often women, come up to me and say, should I have Botox? Should I dye my hair? I say, no, no, no. You need to get physically fit.<br /> <br /> The number one piece of my fitness plan is to get physically fit. I don't mean running fast miles or bench pressing. What I'm talking about is a regular fitness program. A couple of times a week, 20 minutes.<br /> <br /> I walk my dog, but there are lots of things you could swim. Build that into your routine. Have a fitness regime, eat with an eye to nutrition and health. What happens, it's so amazing, when you're physically fit, you have this energy. You have this can-do spirit, this positivity. People want to be around you. They want you to be on their team. Hiring managers see that. They don't really necessarily recognize that's what it is, but they want you on their team. They love that energy. It goes a long way to fighting back that stereotype, that you're not up for the job. You don't have the energy or the stamina. In fact, you can just prove that wrong right there. The second piece of my program is to get financially fit. Now, this one's a little trickier, but what you need to do is, debt is a dream killer. At this stage in our life, if we want to find work that we really want to do. It's something that's going to energize us again, get us excited about work."<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> For More on Kerry Hannon:<br /> <br /> Kerry’s books mentioned in this episode:<br /> New: Never Too Old to Get Rich: The Entrepreneur's Guide to Starting a Business Mid-Life<br /> Great Jobs for Everyone 50 +<br /> <br /> What's Next? Finding Your Passion and Your Dream Job in Your Forties, Fifties and Beyond<br /> <br /> Never Too Old to Get Rich: The Entrepreneur's Guide to Starting a Business Mid-Life<br /> <br /> Kerry’s website<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Bio:<br /> <br /> Retirement Wisdom clean 29:19
What are the Upsides & Challenges of Retirement for Solo Agers? – Sara Zeff Geber https://www.retirementwisdom.com/what-are-the-upsides-and-challenges-of-retirement-for-solo-agers/ Wed, 23 Jan 2019 21:05:25 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=9816 You may know that every day 10,000 Baby Boomers enter retirement. But did you know that almost 1 out of 5 Baby Boomers are childless? In this episode, we talk on with Sara Zeff Geber, Ph.D., author of Essential Retirement Planning for Solo Agers, which was named by The Wall Street Journal as one of the six Best Books of 2018 on Aging Well. Sara shares her insights on the unique upsides and challenges faced by Solo Agers and her perspective on the importance of flexibility. She also discusses strategies to avoid isolation and how Baby Boomers in retirement, especially those who are Solo Agers, can cultivate social networks in retirement. Wise Quote: On Social Support "Solo agers need to also nurture their social support system all the way through life. If you find that your work has superseded that, and you haven't paid enough attention to your social support system, then it's time to really look around you and maybe start to actually make a physical diagram of who are the people around you, what what do they provide for you in the way of support and potential assistance. Sometimes there is work to be done. Finding new friends, finding people to just hang out with now that you're done with working life. That can be done in so many different ways. It can be done by finding interest groups, either through causes you believe in or hobbies or a part-time job. So many of our social system comes from the people that we work with when we're early in earlier in life. When we're in our 30s and 40s and 50s, a lot of people look around and say, "Wow, all my friends are people I know from work." Well, that's all well and good when you're still working, but as you begin to look at relinquishing that work and saying goodbye, opening the door for a younger person to come in behind you, think about who's going to replace that social network. It may take quite a bit of work for a solo ager that is kind of isolated or is maybe more of an introvert." Are you a Solo Ager? Nearly 1 in 5 Baby Boomers are. Listen to author and expert Sara Zeff Geber's strategies and advice.Click To Tweet For more on Sara Zeff Geber: Sara’s Latest Book   Sara’s Websites: https://www.sarazeffgeber.com/ http://www.lifeencore.com/about/sara-zeff-geber   Up for More Wisdom? Sign up for our free monthly newsletter with ideas  you can use   Like Our Podcast? The best way you can support our retirement podcast is to please take a minute and leave us a rating on Apple Podcasts. We appreciate it.   You may know that every day 10,000 Baby Boomers enter retirement. But did you know that almost 1 out of 5 Baby Boomers are childless?

In this episode, we talk on with Sara Zeff Geber, Ph.D., author of Essential Retirement Planning for Solo Agers, which was named by The Wall Street Journal as one of the six Best Books of 2018 on Aging Well.

Sara shares her insights on the unique upsides and challenges faced by Solo Agers and her perspective on the importance of flexibility. She also discusses strategies to avoid isolation and how Baby Boomers in retirement, especially those who are Solo Agers, can cultivate social networks in retirement.

Wise Quote:

On Social Support

“Solo agers need to also nurture their social support system all the way through life. If you find that your work has superseded that, and you haven’t paid enough attention to your social support system, then it’s time to really look around you and maybe start to actually make a physical diagram of who are the people around you, what what do they provide for you in the way of support and potential assistance. Sometimes there is work to be done.

Finding new friends, finding people to just hang out with now that you’re done with working life. That can be done in so many different ways. It can be done by finding interest groups, either through causes you believe in or hobbies or a part-time job. So many of our social system comes from the people that we work with when we’re early in earlier in life. When we’re in our 30s and 40s and 50s, a lot of people look around and say, “Wow, all my friends are people I know from work.” Well, that’s all well and good when you’re still working, but as you begin to look at relinquishing that work and saying goodbye, opening the door for a younger person to come in behind you, think about who’s going to replace that social network. It may take quite a bit of work for a solo ager that is kind of isolated or is maybe more of an introvert.”


Are you a Solo Ager? Nearly 1 in 5 Baby Boomers are. Listen to author and expert Sara Zeff Geber's strategies and advice.
Click To Tweet


For more on Sara Zeff Geber:

Sara’s Latest Book

 

Sara’s Websites:

https://www.sarazeffgeber.com/

http://www.lifeencore.com/about/sara-zeff-geber

 


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Sign up for our free monthly newsletter with ideas  you can use

 

Like Our Podcast?

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You may know that every day 10,000 Baby Boomers enter retirement. But did you know that almost 1 out of 5 Baby Boomers are childless? - In this episode, we talk on with Sara Zeff Geber, Ph.D., author of Essential Retirement Planning for Solo Agers, You may know that every day 10,000 Baby Boomers enter retirement. But did you know that almost 1 out of 5 Baby Boomers are childless?<br /> <br /> In this episode, we talk on with Sara Zeff Geber, Ph.D., author of Essential Retirement Planning for Solo Agers, which was named by The Wall Street Journal as one of the six Best Books of 2018 on Aging Well.<br /> <br /> Sara shares her insights on the unique upsides and challenges faced by Solo Agers and her perspective on the importance of flexibility. She also discusses strategies to avoid isolation and how Baby Boomers in retirement, especially those who are Solo Agers, can cultivate social networks in retirement.<br /> Wise Quote:<br /> On Social Support<br /> <br /> "Solo agers need to also nurture their social support system all the way through life. If you find that your work has superseded that, and you haven't paid enough attention to your social support system, then it's time to really look around you and maybe start to actually make a physical diagram of who are the people around you, what what do they provide for you in the way of support and potential assistance. Sometimes there is work to be done.<br /> <br /> Finding new friends, finding people to just hang out with now that you're done with working life. That can be done in so many different ways. It can be done by finding interest groups, either through causes you believe in or hobbies or a part-time job. So many of our social system comes from the people that we work with when we're early in earlier in life. When we're in our 30s and 40s and 50s, a lot of people look around and say, "Wow, all my friends are people I know from work." Well, that's all well and good when you're still working, but as you begin to look at relinquishing that work and saying goodbye, opening the door for a younger person to come in behind you, think about who's going to replace that social network. It may take quite a bit of work for a solo ager that is kind of isolated or is maybe more of an introvert."<br /> <br /> Are you a Solo Ager? Nearly 1 in 5 Baby Boomers are. Listen to author and expert Sara Zeff Geber's strategies and advice.Click To Tweet<br /> For more on Sara Zeff Geber:<br /> Sara’s Latest Book<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Sara’s Websites:<br /> <br /> https://www.sarazeffgeber.com/<br /> <br /> http://www.lifeencore.com/about/sara-zeff-geber<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Up for More Wisdom?<br /> <br /> Sign up for our free monthly newsletter with ideas  you can use<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Like Our Podcast?<br /> <br /> The best way you can support our retirement podcast is to please take a minute and leave us a rating on Apple Podcasts. We appreciate it.<br /> <br />   Retirement Wisdom clean 36:02
What Will You Do When Work Becomes Optional? – Stan Corey https://www.retirementwisdom.com/what-you-do-work-optional-podcast/ Mon, 21 Jan 2019 15:07:05 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=9284 Retire at 50? If you're fortunate, you'll reach a point where work is no longer driven by financial necessity. Then what? In this episode of our retirement podcast, we're joined by Stan Corey, author of When Work Becomes Optional. Stan offers his perspective on building emotional wealth, why retirement is not a single phase and what non-financial traps to avoid. A recent retiree, Stan shares his personal experiences transitioning to retirement. What will you choose to do when work becomes optional? Author Stan Corey shares his ideas and advice.Click To Tweet Wise Quote: "I think that the transition is probably more impacted by what your work has been, your profession. As I said, I think the transitioning seems to be more difficult for the higher income earners. I have other people who just can't let go of that. And know a gentleman who's in his late seventies and the president of the company. Basically I asked him about retirement. He says 'that's not a word that I think of. 'He says 'I'll stop working when the board of directors thinks I'm no longer of value.' And I felt bad for him. That's putting your value based upon your position and it's hard. So a lot of times I think that people who are more modest in their working careers, I think they have a little easier time with that transition. But after that, it's pretty much very similar, because it's all based on activities, your health, a lot of other factors that will impact the other four stages (of retirement)."   For More on Stan Corey: The Book:When Work Becomes Optional Stan’s Website   Bio Stan Corey retired from his financial planning firm in 2018 after almost 40 years of providing independent financial advice to individuals and closely held businesses. He has been a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ professional (CFP®), Chartered Financial Consultant (ChFC®), and Certified Private Wealth Advisor® (CPWA). Mr. Corey has completed the Harvard Negotiation Institute Negotiation Workshop at Harvard Law. He has served as past President of NVMS in Fairfax, VA and co-wrote and taught a course for Mediator certification, “Economic Issues in Divorce” and has served on many local community service organization’s BODs. He plans to continue consulting in family law matters working as the financial advocate for the less well informed; continue working with several multi-generational clients as a family financial adviser and assisting in estate settlements, continue writing and speaking to professional organizations on a variety of financial topics. He published a book in January 2016, “The Divorce Dance”, a novel about a couple going through divorce where the women teaches the reader about the financial, emotional and legal issues involved as she researches her options. It became a Best Seller on Amazon. His second book, “When Work Becomes Optional”, was released in July 2018 and is receiving wide acclaim for his ability to present many topics facing all retirees as they move through their retirement stages and breaking down complex issues to be more understandable. Like our Podcast? The best way to support our podcast is to take a moment and like it on Apple Podcasts. Thank you.  If you have suggestions on topics you’d like to see us cover, please reach out to Joe Casey at joec@retirementwisdom.com   Balance Your Retirement Planning with Wisdom Sign up for our free monthly newslettter with ideas you can use Retire at 50? If you’re fortunate, you’ll reach a point where work is no longer driven by financial necessity. Then what?

In this episode of our retirement podcast, we’re joined by Stan Corey, author of When Work Becomes Optional. Stan offers his perspective on building emotional wealth, why retirement is not a single phase and what non-financial traps to avoid. A recent retiree, Stan shares his personal experiences transitioning to retirement.


What will you choose to do when work becomes optional? Author Stan Corey shares his ideas and advice.
Click To Tweet


Wise Quote:

“I think that the transition is probably more impacted by what your work has been, your profession. As I said, I think the transitioning seems to be more difficult for the higher income earners. I have other people who just can’t let go of that. And know a gentleman who’s in his late seventies and the president of the company. Basically I asked him about retirement. He says ‘that’s not a word that I think of. ‘He says ‘I’ll stop working when the board of directors thinks I’m no longer of value.’ And I felt bad for him. That’s putting your value based upon your position and it’s hard.

So a lot of times I think that people who are more modest in their working careers, I think they have a little easier time with that transition. But after that, it’s pretty much very similar, because it’s all based on activities, your health, a lot of other factors that will impact the other four stages (of retirement).”

 

For More on Stan Corey:

The Book:When Work Becomes Optional

Stan’s Website

 

Bio

Stan Corey retired from his financial planning firm in 2018 after almost 40 years of providing independent financial advice to individuals and closely held businesses. He has been a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ professional (CFP®), Chartered Financial Consultant (ChFC®), and Certified Private Wealth Advisor® (CPWA). Mr. Corey has completed the Harvard Negotiation Institute Negotiation Workshop at Harvard Law. He has served as past President of NVMS in Fairfax, VA and co-wrote and taught a course for Mediator certification, “Economic Issues in Divorce” and has served on many local community service organization’s BODs.

He plans to continue consulting in family law matters working as the financial advocate for the less well informed; continue working with several multi-generational clients as a family financial adviser and assisting in estate settlements, continue writing and speaking to professional organizations on a variety of financial topics.

He published a book in January 2016, “The Divorce Dance”, a novel about a couple going through divorce where the women teaches the reader about the financial, emotional and legal issues involved as she researches her options. It became a Best Seller on Amazon. His second book, “When Work Becomes Optional”, was released in July 2018 and is receiving wide acclaim for his ability to present many topics facing all retirees as they move through their retirement stages and breaking down complex issues to be more understandable.


Like our Podcast?

The best way to support our podcast is to take a moment and like it on Apple Podcasts. Thank you. 

If you have suggestions on topics you’d like to see us cover, please reach out to Joe Casey at joec@retirementwisdom.com

 

Balance Your Retirement Planning with Wisdom

Sign up for our free monthly newslettter with ideas you can use

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Retire at 50? If you're fortunate, you'll reach a point where work is no longer driven by financial necessity. Then what? - In this episode of our retirement podcast, we're joined by Stan Corey, author of When Work Becomes Optional. Retire at 50? If you're fortunate, you'll reach a point where work is no longer driven by financial necessity. Then what?<br /> <br /> In this episode of our retirement podcast, we're joined by Stan Corey, author of When Work Becomes Optional. Stan offers his perspective on building emotional wealth, why retirement is not a single phase and what non-financial traps to avoid. A recent retiree, Stan shares his personal experiences transitioning to retirement.<br /> <br /> What will you choose to do when work becomes optional? Author Stan Corey shares his ideas and advice.Click To Tweet<br /> Wise Quote:<br /> "I think that the transition is probably more impacted by what your work has been, your profession. As I said, I think the transitioning seems to be more difficult for the higher income earners. I have other people who just can't let go of that. And know a gentleman who's in his late seventies and the president of the company. Basically I asked him about retirement. He says 'that's not a word that I think of. 'He says 'I'll stop working when the board of directors thinks I'm no longer of value.' And I felt bad for him. That's putting your value based upon your position and it's hard.<br /> <br /> So a lot of times I think that people who are more modest in their working careers, I think they have a little easier time with that transition. But after that, it's pretty much very similar, because it's all based on activities, your health, a lot of other factors that will impact the other four stages (of retirement)."<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> For More on Stan Corey:<br /> <br /> The Book:When Work Becomes Optional<br /> <br /> Stan’s Website<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Bio<br /> <br /> Stan Corey retired from his financial planning firm in 2018 after almost 40 years of providing independent financial advice to individuals and closely held businesses. He has been a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ professional (CFP®), Chartered Financial Consultant (ChFC®), and Certified Private Wealth Advisor® (CPWA). Mr. Corey has completed the Harvard Negotiation Institute Negotiation Workshop at Harvard Law. He has served as past President of NVMS in Fairfax, VA and co-wrote and taught a course for Mediator certification, “Economic Issues in Divorce” and has served on many local community service organization’s BODs.<br /> <br /> He plans to continue consulting in family law matters working as the financial advocate for the less well informed; continue working with several multi-generational clients as a family financial adviser and assisting in estate settlements, continue writing and speaking to professional organizations on a variety of financial topics.<br /> <br /> He published a book in January 2016, “The Divorce Dance”, a novel about a couple going through divorce where the women teaches the reader about the financial, emotional and legal issues involved as she researches her options. It became a Best Seller on Amazon. His second book, “When Work Becomes Optional”, was released in July 2018 and is receiving wide acclaim for his ability to present many topics facing all retirees as they move through their retirement stages and breaking down complex issues to be more understandable.<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Like our Podcast?<br /> <br /> The best way to support our podcast is to take a moment and like it on Apple Podcasts. Thank you. <br /> <br /> If you have suggestions on topics you’d like to see us cover, please reach out to Joe Casey at joec@retirementwisdom.com<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Balance Your Retirement Planning with Wisdom<br /> <br /> Sign up for our free monthly newslettter with ideas you can use Retirement Wisdom clean 30:54
What Trends in Retirement Should You Be Up to Speed On? – Catherine Collinson https://www.retirementwisdom.com/trends-in-retirement-podcast/ Tue, 11 Dec 2018 22:51:00 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=8577 Are people retiring earlier or later? What's the retirement age in the US and how is it trending? In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Catherine Collinson, CEO and President of non-profit Transamerica Institute and Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies. Catherine is a retirement and market trends expert and champion for Americans who are at risk of not achieving a financially secure retirement. Catherine shares insights from their research on the key trends driving change for both older workers and employers. Wise Quote: "...We see so much resilience among workers in terms of their expectations and looking beyond traditional retirement. Led by the Baby Boomers and followed by Gen X and Millennials, workers are transforming retirement into something that's really new and different and exciting compared to previous generations. Most notably, is retirement is no longer a proposition in which work and time for enjoying life are a mutually exclusive proposition. Some workers even cite paid work as one of their retirement dreams, which is phenomenal. We would have never even asked that question a few years ago. We know that a lot of people want to work, but we never expected that three in 10 would actually cite some form of paid work as one of their dreams for their retirement."   Retirement today continues to evolve. What key trends should you be up to speed on?Click To Tweet   For more: Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies 18th Annual Transamerica Retirement Survey Follow on Twitter: @TCRStudies Bio Catherine Collinson is CEO and president of nonprofit Transamerica Institute and Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies. Catherine is a retirement and market trends expert and champion for Americans who are at risk of not achieving a financially secure retirement. She oversees all research and outreach initiatives, including the Annual Transamerica Retirement Survey. Catherine also serves as executive director of the Aegon Center for Longevity and Retirement based in the Netherlands. With two decades of retirement industry-related experience, Catherine has become a nationally recognized voice on retirement trends. She has testified before Congress on matters related to employer-sponsored retirement plans among small business, which have featured the need to raise awareness of the Saver’s Credit among those who would benefit most from the important tax credit. Catherine is regularly cited by top media outlets on retirement-related topics, speaks at industry conferences, and authors articles in leading industry journals. She co-hosts ClearPath: Your Roadmap to Health and Wealth on WYPR, Baltimore’s NPR news station. In 2018, Catherine was recognized as an Influencer in Aging by PBS Next Avenue for her work in continuing to push beyond traditional boundaries and change our society's understanding of what it means to grow older. In 2016, she was honored with a Hero Award from the Women's Institute for a Secure Retirement (WISER) for her tireless efforts in helping improve retirement security among women. In 2015, Catherine joined the Advisory Board of the Milken Institute’s Center for the Future of Aging. Catherine is employed by Transamerica Corporation. Since joining the organization in 1995, she has held a number of positions and has identified and implemented short-and long-term strategic initiatives, including the founding of the nonprofit Transamerica Institute and its Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies. Prior to her employment at Transamerica, Catherine spent nearly a decade at The Walt Disney Company, serving in a number of information services and business planning posts. She volunteers for a number of community organizations and currently serves as a Trustee for the California Science Center Foundation. She is also an active member of the Scripps College Alumnae Association and serves on its Alumnae Leadership Council. Are people retiring earlier or later? What’s the retirement age in the US and how is it trending?

In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Catherine Collinson, CEO and President of non-profit Transamerica Institute and Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies. Catherine is a retirement and market trends expert and champion for Americans who are at risk of not achieving a financially secure retirement. Catherine shares insights from their research on the key trends driving change for both older workers and employers.

Wise Quote:

“…We see so much resilience among workers in terms of their expectations and looking beyond traditional retirement. Led by the Baby Boomers and followed by Gen X and Millennials, workers are transforming retirement into something that’s really new and different and exciting compared to previous generations. Most notably, is retirement is no longer a proposition in which work and time for enjoying life are a mutually exclusive proposition.

Some workers even cite paid work as one of their retirement dreams, which is phenomenal. We would have never even asked that question a few years ago. We know that a lot of people want to work, but we never expected that three in 10 would actually cite some form of paid work as one of their dreams for their retirement.”

 


Retirement today continues to evolve. What key trends should you be up to speed on?
Click To Tweet


 

For more:

Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies

18th Annual Transamerica Retirement Survey

Follow on Twitter: @TCRStudies

Bio

Catherine Collinson is CEO and president of nonprofit Transamerica Institute and Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies. Catherine is a retirement and market trends expert and champion for Americans who are at risk of not achieving a financially secure retirement. She oversees all research and outreach initiatives, including the Annual Transamerica Retirement Survey. Catherine also serves as executive director of the Aegon Center for Longevity and Retirement based in the Netherlands.

With two decades of retirement industry-related experience, Catherine has become a nationally recognized voice on retirement trends. She has testified before Congress on matters related to employer-sponsored retirement plans among small business, which have featured the need to raise awareness of the Saver’s Credit among those who would benefit most from the important tax credit.

Catherine is regularly cited by top media outlets on retirement-related topics, speaks at industry conferences, and authors articles in leading industry journals. She co-hosts ClearPath: Your Roadmap to Health and Wealth on WYPR, Baltimore’s NPR news station. In 2018, Catherine was recognized as an Influencer in Aging by PBS Next Avenue for her work in continuing to push beyond traditional boundaries and change our society’s understanding of what it means to grow older. In 2016, she was honored with a Hero Award from the Women’s Institute for a Secure Retirement (WISER) for her tireless efforts in helping improve retirement security among women. In 2015, Catherine joined the Advisory Board of the Milken Institute’s Center for the Future of Aging.

Catherine is employed by Transamerica Corporation. Since joining the organization in 1995, she has held a number of positions and has identified and implemented short-and long-term strategic initiatives, including the founding of the nonprofit Transamerica Institute and its Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies. Prior to her employment at Transamerica, Catherine spent nearly a decade at The Walt Disney Company, serving in a number of information services and business planning posts. She volunteers for a number of community organizations and currently serves as a Trustee for the California Science Center Foundation. She is also an active member of the Scripps College Alumnae Association and serves on its Alumnae Leadership Council. Catherine earned her bachelor’s degree in British and American literature at Scripps College, Claremont, California, and her Master’s of Business Administration at the University of California, Irvine.

 

Noteworthy Article

Stick around for the brief Noteworthy segment where we discuss an article we think is worth your time.

This time we discuss:

This 75-Year Harvard Study Found the 1 Secret to Leading a Fulfilling Life: Here’s some wisdom gleaned from one of the longest longitudinal studies ever conducted.

by Melanie Curtin  – Inc.

 


 

Like our Podcast?

The best way to support our retirement podcast is to take a moment and like it on Apple Podcasts. Thank you. 

If you have suggestions on topics you’d like to see us cover, please reach out to Joe Casey at joec@retirementwisdom.com

 

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Are people retiring earlier or later? What's the retirement age in the US and how is it trending? - In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Catherine Collinson, CEO and President of non-profit Transamerica Institute and Transamerica Ce... Are people retiring earlier or later? What's the retirement age in the US and how is it trending?<br /> <br /> In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Catherine Collinson, CEO and President of non-profit Transamerica Institute and Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies. Catherine is a retirement and market trends expert and champion for Americans who are at risk of not achieving a financially secure retirement. Catherine shares insights from their research on the key trends driving change for both older workers and employers.<br /> <br /> Wise Quote:<br /> <br /> "...We see so much resilience among workers in terms of their expectations and looking beyond traditional retirement. Led by the Baby Boomers and followed by Gen X and Millennials, workers are transforming retirement into something that's really new and different and exciting compared to previous generations. Most notably, is retirement is no longer a proposition in which work and time for enjoying life are a mutually exclusive proposition.<br /> <br /> Some workers even cite paid work as one of their retirement dreams, which is phenomenal. We would have never even asked that question a few years ago. We know that a lot of people want to work, but we never expected that three in 10 would actually cite some form of paid work as one of their dreams for their retirement."<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Retirement today continues to evolve. What key trends should you be up to speed on?Click To Tweet<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> For more: <br /> <br /> Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies<br /> <br /> 18th Annual Transamerica Retirement Survey<br /> <br /> Follow on Twitter: @TCRStudies<br /> <br /> Bio<br /> <br /> Catherine Collinson is CEO and president of nonprofit Transamerica Institute and Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies. Catherine is a retirement and market trends expert and champion for Americans who are at risk of not achieving a financially secure retirement. She oversees all research and outreach initiatives, including the Annual Transamerica Retirement Survey. Catherine also serves as executive director of the Aegon Center for Longevity and Retirement based in the Netherlands.<br /> <br /> With two decades of retirement industry-related experience, Catherine has become a nationally recognized voice on retirement trends. She has testified before Congress on matters related to employer-sponsored retirement plans among small business, which have featured the need to raise awareness of the Saver’s Credit among those who would benefit most from the important tax credit.<br /> <br /> Catherine is regularly cited by top media outlets on retirement-related topics, speaks at industry conferences, and authors articles in leading industry journals. She co-hosts ClearPath: Your Roadmap to Health and Wealth on WYPR, Baltimore’s NPR news station. In 2018, Catherine was recognized as an Influencer in Aging by PBS Next Avenue for her work in continuing to push beyond traditional boundaries and change our society's understanding of what it means to grow older. In 2016, she was honored with a Hero Award from the Women's Institute for a Secure Retirement (WISER) for her tireless efforts in helping improve retirement security among women. In 2015, Catherine joined the Advisory Board of the Milken Institute’s Center for the Future of Aging.<br /> <br /> Catherine is employed by Transamerica Corporation. Since joining the organization in 1995, she has held a number of positions and has identified and implemented short-and long-term strategic initiatives, including the founding of the nonprofit Transamerica Institute and its Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies. Prior to her employment at Transamerica, Catherine spent nearly a decade at The Walt Disney Company, serving in a number of information services and business planning posts. She volunteers for a number of community organizations and currently serves as ... Retirement Wisdom clean 33:06
Is It Time to Break Up with Busy? – Yvonne Tally https://www.retirementwisdom.com/is-it-time-to-break-up-with-busy-podcast/ Thu, 15 Nov 2018 17:57:27 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=8427 In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Yvonne Tally, author of Breaking Up with Busy: Real-Life Solutions for Overscheduled Women. We discuss Yvonne's story, how being busy has become a status symbol today, even in retirement, and how creating a different mindset can be a game-changer at any stage of life. Yvonne offers her insights on how technology and expectations can get in our way and her practical powerful recommendations on actions you can take to cultivate deeper connection in your life. Although her inspiring book is geared toward women, we found it to be very valuable as well, and highly relevant to transitioning to or living in retirement. Isn't it time to break up with Busy?Click To Tweet   For more on Yvonne Tally: Yvonne's Website Breaking Up with Busy  on Amazon   Stick around for the brief Noteworthy segment where we discuss an article we think is worth your time. This week we discuss: The Problem of Being Overcommitted in Retirement  By Glenn Ruffenach - The Wall Street Journal  We also touch on: Saying 'No' is a Key Part of the New Retirement Skill Set   By Joe Casey - Retirement Wisdom   Balance Your Retirement Planning with a Bit of Wisdom Get practical ideas you can use - Sign up for our free monthly newsletter   In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Yvonne Tally, author of Breaking Up with Busy: Real-Life Solutions for Overscheduled Women. We discuss Yvonne’s story, how being busy has become a status symbol today, even in retirement, and how creating a different mindset can be a game-changer at any stage of life. Yvonne offers her insights on how technology and expectations can get in our way and her practical powerful recommendations on actions you can take to cultivate deeper connection in your life. Although her inspiring book is geared toward women, we found it to be very valuable as well, and highly relevant to transitioning to or living in retirement.


Isn't it time to break up with Busy?
Click To Tweet


 

For more on Yvonne Tally:

Yvonne’s Website

Breaking Up with Busy  on Amazon

 

Stick around for the brief Noteworthy segment where we discuss an article we think is worth your time.

This week we discuss:

The Problem of Being Overcommitted in Retirement  By Glenn Ruffenach – The Wall Street Journal

 We also touch on:

Saying ‘No’ is a Key Part of the New Retirement Skill Set   By Joe Casey – Retirement Wisdom


 

Balance Your Retirement Planning with a Bit of Wisdom

Get practical ideas you can use – Sign up for our free monthly newsletter

 

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In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Yvonne Tally, author of Breaking Up with Busy: Real-Life Solutions for Overscheduled Women. We discuss Yvonne's story, how being busy has become a status symbol today, even in retirement, In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Yvonne Tally, author of Breaking Up with Busy: Real-Life Solutions for Overscheduled Women. We discuss Yvonne's story, how being busy has become a status symbol today, even in retirement, and how creating a different mindset can be a game-changer at any stage of life. Yvonne offers her insights on how technology and expectations can get in our way and her practical powerful recommendations on actions you can take to cultivate deeper connection in your life. Although her inspiring book is geared toward women, we found it to be very valuable as well, and highly relevant to transitioning to or living in retirement.<br /> <br /> Isn't it time to break up with Busy?Click To Tweet<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> For more on Yvonne Tally:<br /> <br /> Yvonne's Website<br /> <br /> Breaking Up with Busy  on Amazon<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Stick around for the brief Noteworthy segment where we discuss an article we think is worth your time.<br /> <br /> This week we discuss:<br /> <br /> The Problem of Being Overcommitted in Retirement  By Glenn Ruffenach - The Wall Street Journal<br /> <br />  We also touch on:<br /> <br /> Saying 'No' is a Key Part of the New Retirement Skill Set   By Joe Casey - Retirement Wisdom<br /> <br /> <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Balance Your Retirement Planning with a Bit of Wisdom<br /> <br /> Get practical ideas you can use - Sign up for our free monthly newsletter<br /> <br />   Retirement Wisdom clean 40:34
How Do You Move From Working to Wisdom? – Brendan Hare https://www.retirementwisdom.com/how-do-you-move-from-working-to-wisdom-podcast/ Tue, 06 Nov 2018 01:12:52 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=8351 In this edition of our retirement podcast, we welcome Brendan Hare, author of From Working to Wisdom: The Adventures and Dreams of Older Americans. Upon retiring as a lawyer, Brendan invested two years interviewing 46 older Americans from a variety of backgrounds about their life stories. The book provides a rare look at the real stories of how people are navigating the transition to retirement and a bounty of valuable lessons learned that we can all benefit from. How will you move from Working to Wisdom? Brendan Hare's interviews of 41 retirees provide valuable lessons and advice.Click To Tweet For More on Brendan Hare: From Working to Wisdom Website Brendan Hare's book on Amazon (From Working to Wisdom: The Adventures and Dreams of Older Americans)   Like our Podcast? The best way you can support our podcast is to please take a moment and post a rating on Apple Podcasts. Thank you! If you have suggestions on topics you'd like us to cover, we'd love to hear from you. Please reach out to Joe Casey at joec@retirementwisdom.com   More Wisdom? Yes, please. Sign up for our free monthly newsletter with practical ideas on the non-financial side you can use to balance your retirement planning. In this edition of our retirement podcast, we welcome Brendan Hare, author of From Working to Wisdom: The Adventures and Dreams of Older Americans. Upon retiring as a lawyer, Brendan invested two years interviewing 46 older Americans from a variety of backgrounds about their life stories. The book provides a rare look at the real stories of how people are navigating the transition to retirement and a bounty of valuable lessons learned that we can all benefit from.


How will you move from Working to Wisdom? Brendan Hare's interviews of 41 retirees provide valuable lessons and advice.
Click To Tweet


For More on Brendan Hare:

From Working to Wisdom Website

Brendan Hare’s book on Amazon (From Working to Wisdom: The Adventures and Dreams of Older Americans)

 


Like our Podcast?

The best way you can support our podcast is to please take a moment and post a rating on Apple Podcasts. Thank you!

If you have suggestions on topics you’d like us to cover, we’d love to hear from you. Please reach out to Joe Casey at joec@retirementwisdom.com

 

More Wisdom? Yes, please.

Sign up for our free monthly newsletter with practical ideas on the non-financial side you can use to balance your retirement planning.

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In this edition of our retirement podcast, we welcome Brendan Hare, author of From Working to Wisdom: The Adventures and Dreams of Older Americans. Upon retiring as a lawyer, Brendan invested two years interviewing 46 older Americans from a variety of ... In this edition of our retirement podcast, we welcome Brendan Hare, author of From Working to Wisdom: The Adventures and Dreams of Older Americans. Upon retiring as a lawyer, Brendan invested two years interviewing 46 older Americans from a variety of backgrounds about their life stories. The book provides a rare look at the real stories of how people are navigating the transition to retirement and a bounty of valuable lessons learned that we can all benefit from.<br /> <br /> How will you move from Working to Wisdom? Brendan Hare's interviews of 41 retirees provide valuable lessons and advice.Click To Tweet<br /> <br /> For More on Brendan Hare:<br /> <br /> From Working to Wisdom Website<br /> <br /> Brendan Hare's book on Amazon (From Working to Wisdom: The Adventures and Dreams of Older Americans)<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Like our Podcast?<br /> <br /> The best way you can support our podcast is to please take a moment and post a rating on Apple Podcasts. Thank you!<br /> <br /> If you have suggestions on topics you'd like us to cover, we'd love to hear from you. Please reach out to Joe Casey at joec@retirementwisdom.com<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> More Wisdom? Yes, please.<br /> <br /> Sign up for our free monthly newsletter with practical ideas on the non-financial side you can use to balance your retirement planning. Retirement Wisdom clean 35:33
How Can You Be Better with Age? – Alan Castel https://www.retirementwisdom.com/how-can-you-be-better-with-age-podcast/ Wed, 24 Oct 2018 14:22:51 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=8292 Wise choices can help you to retire healthy. On this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Alan Castel, Ph.D. Alan Castel is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles where he studies learning, memory, and aging.  Alan joins us to discuss his new book Better with Age: The Psychology of Successful Aging. We discuss what people of all ages need to know about successful aging and what people can do now  - at just about any age - to prepare to retire healthy.   Alan Castel, the author of Better with Age: The Psychology of Successful Aging, shares strategies you can use in your 40's, 50's, 60's,70s and beyond.Click To Tweet.   Wise Quotes: "Retirement can be a challenge. It can be a challenge both for the person retiring, for their spouse, for their family around them, because you lose a lot of the structure you had in your life. Even the small talk you might have had in the workplace, can almost protect you from loneliness. You can feel valued in your profession. When you take all of that away, you know, just playing golf every day is not going to solve the need for stimulation, being around other people." "Everyone approaches retirement differently. For example, the architect Frank Gehry, his work is really blossoming now and he's doing amazing things. I don't think he wants to retire, but he's focusing on the projects that interest him the most, so he can be more selective. Maya Angelou shifted her career, spent more time writing, but also presenting and teaching. So these people certainly didn't walk away from their profession. John Wooden, the famous basketball coach, on the other hand, didn't retire kind of at the top of his game at age 65, having won another national championship. But then he transitioned into consulting, working with others, doing a lot of public speaking. But even at age 95 when I spoke to him, he said he missed the game, he said he loved to be involved in some way, as a consultant working with coaches." " ... even though we might not think of our job as our identity, it can influence us in ways that we're not familiar with. Once we transitioned out of that, we're left with sometimes a big hole, and a lot of older adults might fear retirement for reasons that go beyond financial ones."   For more on Alan Castel, PhD: Alan's Book: Better with Age: The Psychology of Successful Aging  Ted x Talk: How We Learn as We Age   Bio: Alan Castel is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles. He studies learning, memory, and aging. He is interested in how younger and older adults can selectively remember important information. He lectures internationally to people of all ages. His work has been featured in the New York Times and Time Magazine and has a new book entitled Better with Age: The Psychology of Successful Aging. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Toronto, did a fellowship at Washington University in St. Louis, and has been on faculty at UCLA since 2006.   Related Book Reviews Better with Age: The Psychology of Healthy Aging The Rabbit Effect: Live Longer, Happier & Healthier with the Groundbreaking Science of Kindness     Like Our Podcast? The best way you can support our retirement podcast is to please take a minute and post a rating on Apple Podcasts. We appreciate it. Wise choices can help you to retire healthy. On this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Alan Castel, Ph.D.

Alan Castel is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles where he studies learning, memory, and aging.  Alan joins us to discuss his new book Better with Age: The Psychology of Successful Aging. We discuss what people of all ages need to know about successful aging and what people can do now  – at just about any age – to prepare to retire healthy.

 


Alan Castel, the author of Better with Age: The Psychology of Successful Aging, shares strategies you can use in your 40's, 50's, 60's,70s and beyond.
Click To Tweet


.

 

Wise Quotes:

“Retirement can be a challenge. It can be a challenge both for the person retiring, for their spouse, for their family around them, because you lose a lot of the structure you had in your life. Even the small talk you might have had in the workplace, can almost protect you from loneliness. You can feel valued in your profession. When you take all of that away, you know, just playing golf every day is not going to solve the need for stimulation, being around other people.”

“Everyone approaches retirement differently. For example, the architect Frank Gehry, his work is really blossoming now and he’s doing amazing things. I don’t think he wants to retire, but he’s focusing on the projects that interest him the most, so he can be more selective. Maya Angelou shifted her career, spent more time writing, but also presenting and teaching. So these people certainly didn’t walk away from their profession. John Wooden, the famous basketball coach, on the other hand, didn’t retire kind of at the top of his game at age 65, having won another national championship. But then he transitioned into consulting, working with others, doing a lot of public speaking. But even at age 95 when I spoke to him, he said he missed the game, he said he loved to be involved in some way, as a consultant working with coaches.”

” … even though we might not think of our job as our identity, it can influence us in ways that we’re not familiar with. Once we transitioned out of that, we’re left with sometimes a big hole, and a lot of older adults might fear retirement for reasons that go beyond financial ones.”

 

For more on Alan Castel, PhD:

Alan’s Book: Better with Age: The Psychology of Successful Aging 

Ted x Talk: How We Learn as We Age

 

Bio:

Alan Castel is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles. He studies learning, memory, and aging. He is interested in how younger and older adults can selectively remember important information.

He lectures internationally to people of all ages. His work has been featured in the New York Times and Time Magazine and has a new book entitled Better with Age: The Psychology of Successful Aging.

He received his Ph.D. from the University of Toronto, did a fellowship at Washington University in St. Louis, and has been on faculty at UCLA since 2006.

 

Related Book Reviews

Better with Age: The Psychology of Healthy Aging

The Rabbit Effect: Live Longer, Happier & Healthier with the Groundbreaking Science of Kindness

 


 

Like Our Podcast?

The best way you can support our retirement podcast is to please take a minute and post a rating on Apple Podcasts. We appreciate it.

]]>
Wise choices can help you to retire healthy. On this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Alan Castel, Ph.D. - Alan Castel is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of California, Wise choices can help you to retire healthy. On this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Alan Castel, Ph.D.<br /> <br /> Alan Castel is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles where he studies learning, memory, and aging.  Alan joins us to discuss his new book Better with Age: The Psychology of Successful Aging. We discuss what people of all ages need to know about successful aging and what people can do now  - at just about any age - to prepare to retire healthy.<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Alan Castel, the author of Better with Age: The Psychology of Successful Aging, shares strategies you can use in your 40's, 50's, 60's,70s and beyond.Click To Tweet.<br /> <br />  <br /> Wise Quotes:<br /> "Retirement can be a challenge. It can be a challenge both for the person retiring, for their spouse, for their family around them, because you lose a lot of the structure you had in your life. Even the small talk you might have had in the workplace, can almost protect you from loneliness. You can feel valued in your profession. When you take all of that away, you know, just playing golf every day is not going to solve the need for stimulation, being around other people."<br /> <br /> "Everyone approaches retirement differently. For example, the architect Frank Gehry, his work is really blossoming now and he's doing amazing things. I don't think he wants to retire, but he's focusing on the projects that interest him the most, so he can be more selective. Maya Angelou shifted her career, spent more time writing, but also presenting and teaching. So these people certainly didn't walk away from their profession. John Wooden, the famous basketball coach, on the other hand, didn't retire kind of at the top of his game at age 65, having won another national championship. But then he transitioned into consulting, working with others, doing a lot of public speaking. But even at age 95 when I spoke to him, he said he missed the game, he said he loved to be involved in some way, as a consultant working with coaches."<br /> <br /> " ... even though we might not think of our job as our identity, it can influence us in ways that we're not familiar with. Once we transitioned out of that, we're left with sometimes a big hole, and a lot of older adults might fear retirement for reasons that go beyond financial ones."<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> For more on Alan Castel, PhD:<br /> <br /> Alan's Book: Better with Age: The Psychology of Successful Aging <br /> <br /> Ted x Talk: How We Learn as We Age<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Bio:<br /> <br /> Alan Castel is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles. He studies learning, memory, and aging. He is interested in how younger and older adults can selectively remember important information.<br /> <br /> He lectures internationally to people of all ages. His work has been featured in the New York Times and Time Magazine and has a new book entitled Better with Age: The Psychology of Successful Aging.<br /> <br /> He received his Ph.D. from the University of Toronto, did a fellowship at Washington University in St. Louis, and has been on faculty at UCLA since 2006.<br /> <br />  <br /> Related Book Reviews<br /> Better with Age: The Psychology of Healthy Aging<br /> <br /> The Rabbit Effect: Live Longer, Happier & Healthier with the Groundbreaking Science of Kindness<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Like Our Podcast?<br /> <br /> The best way you can support our retirement podcast is to please take a minute and post a rating on Apple Podcasts. We appreciate it. Retirement Wisdom clean 35:56
Is This Risk on Your Radar? – Julie Belshe https://www.retirementwisdom.com/is-this-risk-on-your-radar-podcast/ Mon, 01 Oct 2018 18:35:03 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=8248 In this special edition of The Retirement Conversation, we talk with Julie Belshe, about the shocking story of what happened to her parents, who were kidnapped by a Private Guardian. Julie shares her experiences in fighting to get them back, what she's doing today as an advocate for reform and what we all need to know about Guardianship Fraud.   For more on Julie Belshe: The New Yorker - How the Elderly Lose Their Rights Trailer for new DocumentaryThe Guardians The Kasem Cares Foundation   Stick around for the brief Noteworthy segment on an article we think is worth your time This week's selection is Elder Financial Abuse Will Get Worse As Americans Age by Teresa Ghilarducci in Forbes     Balance Your Retirement Planning with a Side of Wisdom Sign up for our monthly newsletter with ideas you can use.  

In this special edition of The Retirement Conversation, we talk with Julie Belshe, about the shocking story of what happened to her parents, who were kidnapped by a Private Guardian. Julie shares her experiences in fighting to get them back, what she’s doing today as an advocate for reform and what we all need to know about Guardianship Fraud.

 

For more on Julie Belshe:

The New Yorker – How the Elderly Lose Their Rights

Trailer for new DocumentaryThe Guardians

The Kasem Cares Foundation

 

Stick around for the brief Noteworthy segment on an article we think is worth your time

This week’s selection is Elder Financial Abuse Will Get Worse As Americans Age by Teresa Ghilarducci in Forbes

 

 


Balance Your Retirement Planning with a Side of Wisdom

Sign up for our monthly newsletter with ideas you can use.

 

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In this special edition of The Retirement Conversation, we talk with Julie Belshe, about the shocking story of what happened to her parents, who were kidnapped by a Private Guardian. Julie shares her experiences in fighting to get them back, In this special edition of The Retirement Conversation, we talk with Julie Belshe, about the shocking story of what happened to her parents, who were kidnapped by a Private Guardian. Julie shares her experiences in fighting to get them back, what she's doing today as an advocate for reform and what we all need to know about Guardianship Fraud.<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> For more on Julie Belshe:<br /> <br /> The New Yorker - How the Elderly Lose Their Rights<br /> <br /> Trailer for new DocumentaryThe Guardians<br /> <br /> The Kasem Cares Foundation<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Stick around for the brief Noteworthy segment on an article we think is worth your time<br /> <br /> This week's selection is Elder Financial Abuse Will Get Worse As Americans Age by Teresa Ghilarducci in Forbes<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />  <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Balance Your Retirement Planning with a Side of Wisdom<br /> <br /> Sign up for our monthly newsletter with ideas you can use.<br /> <br />   Retirement Wisdom clean 36:54
Will You Be an Entrepreneur in Your Second Act Career? – Dorie Clark https://www.retirementwisdom.com/will-you-be-an-entrepreneur-in-your-second-act-podcast/ Mon, 10 Sep 2018 13:21:18 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=8227 In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Dorie Clark, about her latest book Entrepreneurial You. Dorie is a highly successful entrepreneur and she shares her story of transitioning from journalism and her observations on why entrepreneurship is an attractive option for some people as a Second Act Career. She gives us her take on what it takes to succeed and practical tips on where to start. If you've ever thought about starting your own business after your primary career, you'll benefit from hearing Dorie's story, her valuable advice and wisdom. How can you leverage your skill-set as an entrepreneur in your Second Act?Click To Tweet   For more on Dorie Clark: Dorie's Website Dorie's Entrepreneurial Self -Assessment Dorie's latest book:  Entrepreneurial You  and her courses   Stick around for the brief Noteworthy segment on an article we think is worth your time This week's selection is Proof That the Most Successful Entrepreneurs Are Older Ones By Kerry Hannon, Next Avenue       Ready for More Wisdom? Sign up for our monthly newsletter and stay current with ideas you can use to balance your retirement planning   In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Dorie Clark, about her latest book Entrepreneurial You. Dorie is a highly successful entrepreneur and she shares her story of transitioning from journalism and her observations on why entrepreneurship is an attractive option for some people as a Second Act Career. She gives us her take on what it takes to succeed and practical tips on where to start. If you’ve ever thought about starting your own business after your primary career, you’ll benefit from hearing Dorie’s story, her valuable advice and wisdom.


How can you leverage your skill-set as an entrepreneur in your Second Act?
Click To Tweet


 

For more on Dorie Clark:

Dorie’s Website

Dorie’s Entrepreneurial Self -Assessment

Dorie’s latest book:  Entrepreneurial You  and her courses

 

Stick around for the brief Noteworthy segment on an article we think is worth your time

This week’s selection is Proof That the Most Successful Entrepreneurs Are Older Ones

By Kerry Hannon, Next Avenue

 

 


 

Ready for More Wisdom?

Sign up for our monthly newsletter and stay current with ideas you can use to balance your retirement planning

 

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In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Dorie Clark, about her latest book Entrepreneurial You. Dorie is a highly successful entrepreneur and she shares her story of transitioning from journalism and her observations on why entrepreneur... In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Dorie Clark, about her latest book Entrepreneurial You. Dorie is a highly successful entrepreneur and she shares her story of transitioning from journalism and her observations on why entrepreneurship is an attractive option for some people as a Second Act Career. She gives us her take on what it takes to succeed and practical tips on where to start. If you've ever thought about starting your own business after your primary career, you'll benefit from hearing Dorie's story, her valuable advice and wisdom.<br /> <br /> How can you leverage your skill-set as an entrepreneur in your Second Act?Click To Tweet<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> For more on Dorie Clark:<br /> <br /> Dorie's Website<br /> <br /> Dorie's Entrepreneurial Self -Assessment<br /> <br /> Dorie's latest book:  Entrepreneurial You  and her courses<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Stick around for the brief Noteworthy segment on an article we think is worth your time<br /> <br /> This week's selection is Proof That the Most Successful Entrepreneurs Are Older Ones<br /> <br /> By Kerry Hannon, Next Avenue<br /> <br />  <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Ready for More Wisdom?<br /> <br /> Sign up for our monthly newsletter and stay current with ideas you can use to balance your retirement planning<br /> <br />   Retirement Wisdom clean 30:28
Are You Thinking About Going Back to School in Retirement? – Nell Painter https://www.retirementwisdom.com/creating-your-second-act-by-going-back-to-school-podcast/ Mon, 27 Aug 2018 18:23:32 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=8194 In this conversation on our retirement podcast, we talk with Dr. Nell Painter, distinguished historian and retired professor from Princeton University, about her latest book Old in Art School: A Memoir of Starting Over (named one of Time's Best Memoirs of 2018 So Far). She shares her insights about her experience in returning to school for a BA and MFA in a different field, the challenges and obstacles she overcame and what she learned about reinventing herself along the way. If you've ever toyed with the idea of returning to school, you'll benefit from hearing the inspiring story of her journey - and her practical advice and wisdom on how to get started.   A compelling and inspiring story of going back to school and pursuing a lifelong interest. Nell Painter, author of Old in Art School: A Memoir of Starting Over on The Retirement Conversation…Click To Tweet   For more on Dr. Nell Painter: Nell Painter's Website Old in Art School: A Memoir of Starting Over on Amazon (Note: Named One of O: The Oprah Magazine's Top Books of Summer) Follow Dr. Painter on Twitter: @PainterNell Dr. Painter's complete bio   Stick around for the brief Noteworthy segment on an article we think is worth your time This week's selection is How to Be a Life Long Learner by Kira M. Newman in Greater Good Magazine   Subscribe in the menu bar above to receive our new episodes twice a month.   Interested in More Wisdom? Sign up for our free monthly newsletter for ideas you can use. In this conversation on our retirement podcast, we talk with Dr. Nell Painter, distinguished historian and retired professor from Princeton University, about her latest book Old in Art School: A Memoir of Starting Over (named one of Time’s Best Memoirs of 2018 So Far). She shares her insights about her experience in returning to school for a BA and MFA in a different field, the challenges and obstacles she overcame and what she learned about reinventing herself along the way. If you’ve ever toyed with the idea of returning to school, you’ll benefit from hearing the inspiring story of her journey – and her practical advice and wisdom on how to get started.

 


A compelling and inspiring story of going back to school and pursuing a lifelong interest. Nell Painter, author of Old in Art School: A Memoir of Starting Over on The Retirement Conversation…
Click To Tweet


 

For more on Dr. Nell Painter:

Nell Painter’s Website

Old in Art School: A Memoir of Starting Over on Amazon

(Note: Named One of O: The Oprah Magazine‘s Top Books of Summer)

Follow Dr. Painter on Twitter: @PainterNell

Dr. Painter’s complete bio

 

Stick around for the brief Noteworthy segment on an article we think is worth your time

This week’s selection is How to Be a Life Long Learner

by Kira M. Newman in Greater Good Magazine

 

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In this conversation on our retirement podcast, we talk with Dr. Nell Painter, distinguished historian and retired professor from Princeton University, about her latest book Old in Art School: A Memoir of Starting Over (named one of Time's Best Memoirs... In this conversation on our retirement podcast, we talk with Dr. Nell Painter, distinguished historian and retired professor from Princeton University, about her latest book Old in Art School: A Memoir of Starting Over (named one of Time's Best Memoirs of 2018 So Far). She shares her insights about her experience in returning to school for a BA and MFA in a different field, the challenges and obstacles she overcame and what she learned about reinventing herself along the way. If you've ever toyed with the idea of returning to school, you'll benefit from hearing the inspiring story of her journey - and her practical advice and wisdom on how to get started.<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> A compelling and inspiring story of going back to school and pursuing a lifelong interest. Nell Painter, author of Old in Art School: A Memoir of Starting Over on The Retirement Conversation…Click To Tweet<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> For more on Dr. Nell Painter:<br /> <br /> Nell Painter's Website<br /> <br /> Old in Art School: A Memoir of Starting Over on Amazon <br /> <br /> (Note: Named One of O: The Oprah Magazine's Top Books of Summer)<br /> <br /> Follow Dr. Painter on Twitter: @PainterNell<br /> <br /> Dr. Painter's complete bio<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Stick around for the brief Noteworthy segment on an article we think is worth your time<br /> <br /> This week's selection is How to Be a Life Long Learner<br /> <br /> by Kira M. Newman in Greater Good Magazine<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Subscribe in the menu bar above to receive our new episodes twice a month.<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Interested in More Wisdom?<br /> <br /> Sign up for our free monthly newsletter for ideas you can use. Retirement Wisdom clean 26:47
Is Your Company Ready for the Aging Workforce? – Paul Rupert https://www.retirementwisdom.com/is-your-company-fully-ready-for-the-aging-workforce-podcast/ Mon, 06 Aug 2018 22:31:51 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=8161 In this conversation on our retirement planning podcast, Joe talks with Paul Rupert, CEO of Respectful Exits about trends in the workplace for seasoned workers. Paul offers his views on what smart companies can do to attract and retain talented older workers, shares his advice on how individuals can approach negotiating flexible work options and the story behind his new advocacy organization. Is your company prepared to leverage the experience of older workers?Click To Tweet   For more on Paul Rupert: Website: Respectful Exits: The Voice of Aging Workers Twitter @RespectfulExits   GAO Report to the Special Committee on Aging, U.S. Senate: Older Workers - Phased Retirement Programs, Although Uncommon, Provide Flexibility for Workers and Employers   Stay around for the Noteworthy segment on an article worth your time This week's selection is The Big Changes Ahead for Boomer Workers by Richard Eisenberg - Next Avenue       Balance Your Retirement Planning with Wisdom Sign up for our free monthly newsletter with ideas you can use. In this conversation on our retirement planning podcast, Joe talks with Paul Rupert, CEO of Respectful Exits about trends in the workplace for seasoned workers. Paul offers his views on what smart companies can do to attract and retain talented older workers, shares his advice on how individuals can approach negotiating flexible work options and the story behind his new advocacy organization.


Is your company prepared to leverage the experience of older workers?
Click To Tweet


 

For more on Paul Rupert:

Website: Respectful Exits: The Voice of Aging Workers

Twitter @RespectfulExits

 

GAO Report to the Special Committee on Aging, U.S. Senate:

Older Workers – Phased Retirement Programs, Although Uncommon, Provide Flexibility for Workers and Employers

 

Stay around for the Noteworthy segment on an article worth your time

This week’s selection is The Big Changes Ahead for Boomer Workers

by Richard Eisenberg – Next Avenue

 

 


 

Balance Your Retirement Planning with Wisdom

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In this conversation on our retirement planning podcast, Joe talks with Paul Rupert, CEO of Respectful Exits about trends in the workplace for seasoned workers. Paul offers his views on what smart companies can do to attract and retain talented older w... In this conversation on our retirement planning podcast, Joe talks with Paul Rupert, CEO of Respectful Exits about trends in the workplace for seasoned workers. Paul offers his views on what smart companies can do to attract and retain talented older workers, shares his advice on how individuals can approach negotiating flexible work options and the story behind his new advocacy organization.<br /> <br /> Is your company prepared to leverage the experience of older workers?Click To Tweet<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> For more on Paul Rupert:<br /> <br /> Website: Respectful Exits: The Voice of Aging Workers<br /> <br /> Twitter @RespectfulExits<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> GAO Report to the Special Committee on Aging, U.S. Senate:<br /> <br /> Older Workers - Phased Retirement Programs, Although Uncommon, Provide Flexibility for Workers and Employers<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Stay around for the Noteworthy segment on an article worth your time<br /> <br /> This week's selection is The Big Changes Ahead for Boomer Workers<br /> <br /> by Richard Eisenberg - Next Avenue<br /> <br />  <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Balance Your Retirement Planning with Wisdom<br /> <br /> Sign up for our free monthly newsletter with ideas you can use. Retirement Wisdom clean 45:34
Why Are People Unretiring? – Nicole Maestas https://www.retirementwisdom.com/why-are-people-unretiring-podcast/ Fri, 03 Aug 2018 00:57:41 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=8143 In this episode of our podcast about retirement and career switches, Joe talks with Nicole Maestas, Ph.D., an economist at Harvard Medical School, about the interesting trend of un-retirement, the notable benefits of working longer and what women need to think about in planning for retirement. You can keep up with Nicole's work by following her on Twitter @NicoleMaestas2  Why are people unretiring? It's not always about the money...Click To Tweet Relevant Articles  Women Outlive Men. Why Do They Retire Earlier?  Many Americans Try Retirement, Then Change Their Minds - The New York Times   Noteworthy  Stick around for a brief discussion of an article that we think is worth your time. This week's recommended article is Planning Your Post-Retirement Career by Dorie Clark at HBR.org.    Check out The Retirement Conversation podcast!Click To Tweet       Could Your Retirement Planning Use a Little More Wisdom? It's easy to focus on the financial side of retirement planning and put off planning for the softer side of retirement. Sign up for our free monthly newsletter with ideas you can use.   Like our Podcast? You can support our podcast by taking a moment to post a rating, and comments if you'd like, on Apple Podcasts. Thank you! In this episode of our podcast about retirement and career switches, Joe talks with Nicole Maestas, Ph.D., an economist at Harvard Medical School, about the interesting trend of un-retirement, the notable benefits of working longer and what women need to think about in planning for retirement.

You can keep up with Nicole’s work by following her on Twitter @NicoleMaestas2 


Why are people unretiring? It's not always about the money...
Click To Tweet


Relevant Articles 

Women Outlive Men. Why Do They Retire Earlier? 

Many Americans Try Retirement, Then Change Their Minds – The New York Times  

Noteworthy 

Stick around for a brief discussion of an article that we think is worth your time. This week’s recommended article is Planning Your Post-Retirement Career by Dorie Clark at HBR.org. 

 


Check out The Retirement Conversation podcast!
Click To Tweet


 

 


 

Could Your Retirement Planning Use a Little More Wisdom?

It’s easy to focus on the financial side of retirement planning and put off planning for the softer side of retirement.

Sign up for our free monthly newsletter with ideas you can use.

 

Like our Podcast?

You can support our podcast by taking a moment to post a rating, and comments if you’d like, on Apple Podcasts.

Thank you!

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In this episode of our podcast about retirement and career switches, Joe talks with Nicole Maestas, Ph.D., an economist at Harvard Medical School, about the interesting trend of un-retirement, the notable benefits of working longer and what women need ... In this episode of our podcast about retirement and career switches, Joe talks with Nicole Maestas, Ph.D., an economist at Harvard Medical School, about the interesting trend of un-retirement, the notable benefits of working longer and what women need to think about in planning for retirement.<br /> <br /> You can keep up with Nicole's work by following her on Twitter @NicoleMaestas2 <br /> <br /> Why are people unretiring? It's not always about the money...Click To Tweet<br /> <br /> Relevant Articles <br /> Women Outlive Men. Why Do They Retire Earlier? <br /> Many Americans Try Retirement, Then Change Their Minds - The New York Times  <br /> <br /> Noteworthy <br /> <br /> Stick around for a brief discussion of an article that we think is worth your time. This week's recommended article is Planning Your Post-Retirement Career by Dorie Clark at HBR.org. <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Check out The Retirement Conversation podcast!Click To Tweet<br /> <br />  <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Could Your Retirement Planning Use a Little More Wisdom?<br /> <br /> It's easy to focus on the financial side of retirement planning and put off planning for the softer side of retirement.<br /> <br /> Sign up for our free monthly newsletter with ideas you can use.<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Like our Podcast?<br /> <br /> You can support our podcast by taking a moment to post a rating, and comments if you'd like, on Apple Podcasts.<br /> <br /> Thank you! Retirement Wisdom clean 26:38
Why Settle for Happiness in Your Retirement? – Emily Esfahani Smith https://www.retirementwisdom.com/why-settle-for-happiness/ Mon, 23 Jul 2018 17:54:35 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=8107 In this episode of our retirement life podcast, we talk with Emily Esfahani Smith, author of The Power of Meaning. Emily shares her insights on why purpose and meaning offer great fulfillment and how they can be cultivated in a culture that's obsessed with happiness. Happiness is fleeting. Cultivate purpose and meaning.Click To Tweet Show Notes Emily's Book: The Power of Meaning: Crafting a Life That Matters by Emily Esfahani Smith Amazon: https://amzn.to/2uE4cMe Emily's TED Talk: There's More to Life Than Being Happy Stick Around for the Noteworthy segment where we discuss an article we think is worth your time. This week's selection: Kick Back or Live With Purpose? Why Choose? by Anne Colby and Jim Emmerman This article summarizes new research conducted by Stanford and Encore.org noting that over 30 percent of adults over 50 are purposeful beyond themselves - and dispels the belief that a purposeful retirement life cannot be integrated with your personal pursuits. Listen to Emily Esfahani Smith, author of The Power of Meaning, on the new episode of The Retirement Conversation podcast. Click To Tweet Free Newsletter Sign up for our free monthly newsletter with ideas you can use.     In this episode of our retirement life podcast, we talk with Emily Esfahani Smith, author of The Power of Meaning.
Emily shares her insights on why purpose and meaning offer great fulfillment and how they can be cultivated in a culture that’s obsessed with happiness.

Happiness is fleeting. Cultivate purpose and meaning.
Click To Tweet


Show Notes
Emily’s Book:
The Power of Meaning: Crafting a Life That Matters by Emily Esfahani Smith
Amazon: https://amzn.to/2uE4cMe
Emily’s TED Talk:
Stick Around for the Noteworthy segment where we discuss an article we think is worth your time.
This week’s selection:
Kick Back or Live With Purpose? Why Choose? by Anne Colby and Jim Emmerman
This article summarizes new research conducted by Stanford and Encore.org noting that over 30 percent of adults over 50 are purposeful beyond themselves – and dispels the belief that a purposeful retirement life cannot be integrated with your personal pursuits.

Listen to Emily Esfahani Smith, author of The Power of Meaning, on the new episode of The Retirement Conversation podcast.
Click To Tweet



Free Newsletter

Sign up for our free monthly newsletter with ideas you can use.

 

 

]]>
In this episode of our retirement life podcast, we talk with Emily Esfahani Smith, author of The Power of Meaning. Emily shares her insights on why purpose and meaning offer great fulfillment and how they can be cultivated in a culture that's obsessed... In this episode of our retirement life podcast, we talk with Emily Esfahani Smith, author of The Power of Meaning.<br /> Emily shares her insights on why purpose and meaning offer great fulfillment and how they can be cultivated in a culture that's obsessed with happiness.<br /> <br /> <br /> Happiness is fleeting. Cultivate purpose and meaning.Click To Tweet<br /> <br /> Show Notes<br /> <br /> Emily's Book:<br /> The Power of Meaning: Crafting a Life That Matters by Emily Esfahani Smith<br /> Amazon: https://amzn.to/2uE4cMe<br /> <br /> <br /> Emily's TED Talk:<br /> There's More to Life Than Being Happy<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Stick Around for the Noteworthy segment where we discuss an article we think is worth your time.<br /> <br /> This week's selection:<br /> <br /> <br /> Kick Back or Live With Purpose? Why Choose? by Anne Colby and Jim Emmerman<br /> This article summarizes new research conducted by Stanford and Encore.org noting that over 30 percent of adults over 50 are purposeful beyond themselves - and dispels the belief that a purposeful retirement life cannot be integrated with your personal pursuits.<br /> <br /> Listen to Emily Esfahani Smith, author of The Power of Meaning, on the new episode of The Retirement Conversation podcast. Click To Tweet<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Free Newsletter<br /> <br /> Sign up for our free monthly newsletter with ideas you can use.<br /> <br />  <br /> <br />   Retirement Wisdom clean 33:28
Who Will You Be in Retirement? – David Ekerdt https://www.retirementwisdom.com/who-will-you-be-in-retirement/ Mon, 09 Jul 2018 17:23:11 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=8072 In this conversation on our podcast on retirement, we interview Dr. David Ekerdt, University of Kansas professor and President of the Gerontological Society of America.  He shares his observations and findings from his research on what influences our views of retirement, how people should embrace different lifestyles in retirement – and how preparing for downsizing ahead of retirement can make you more nimble. Article by David Ekerdt In Defense of the Not-So-Busy Retirement - The Wall Street Journal https://www.wsj.com/articles/in-defense-of-the-not-so-busy-retirement-1524449520 or https://www.facebook.com/wsj/posts/10157719895973128   Stick Around for the Noteworthy segment where Joe & Denis discuss an article worth reading This week’s selection is To Control Your Life, Control What You Pay Attention To by Maura Thomas, an interesting piece on how we can benefit from Attention Management instead of Time Management. https://hbr.org/2018/03/to-control-your-life-control-what-you-pay-attention-to     Sign Up for More Wisdom Join our free monthly newsletter for ideas you can use. In this conversation on our podcast on retirement, we interview Dr. David Ekerdt, University of Kansas professor and President of the Gerontological Society of America.  He shares his observations and findings from his research on what influences our views of retirement, how people should embrace different lifestyles in retirement – and how preparing for downsizing ahead of retirement can make you more nimble.

Article by David Ekerdt

In Defense of the Not-So-Busy Retirement – The Wall Street Journal

https://www.wsj.com/articles/in-defense-of-the-not-so-busy-retirement-1524449520

or

https://www.facebook.com/wsj/posts/10157719895973128

 

Stick Around for the Noteworthy segment where Joe & Denis discuss an article worth reading

This week’s selection is To Control Your Life, Control What You Pay Attention To

by Maura Thomas, an interesting piece on how we can benefit from Attention Management instead of Time Management.

https://hbr.org/2018/03/to-control-your-life-control-what-you-pay-attention-to

 

 


Sign Up for More Wisdom

Join our free monthly newsletter for ideas you can use.

]]>
In this conversation on our podcast on retirement, we interview Dr. David Ekerdt, University of Kansas professor and President of the Gerontological Society of America.  He shares his observations and findings from his research on what influences our v... In this conversation on our podcast on retirement, we interview Dr. David Ekerdt, University of Kansas professor and President of the Gerontological Society of America.  He shares his observations and findings from his research on what influences our views of retirement, how people should embrace different lifestyles in retirement – and how preparing for downsizing ahead of retirement can make you more nimble.<br /> <br /> Article by David Ekerdt<br /> <br /> In Defense of the Not-So-Busy Retirement - The Wall Street Journal <br /> <br /> https://www.wsj.com/articles/in-defense-of-the-not-so-busy-retirement-1524449520<br /> <br /> or<br /> <br /> https://www.facebook.com/wsj/posts/10157719895973128<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Stick Around for the Noteworthy segment where Joe & Denis discuss an article worth reading<br /> <br /> This week’s selection is To Control Your Life, Control What You Pay Attention To<br /> <br /> by Maura Thomas, an interesting piece on how we can benefit from Attention Management instead of Time Management.<br /> <br /> https://hbr.org/2018/03/to-control-your-life-control-what-you-pay-attention-to<br /> <br />  <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Sign Up for More Wisdom<br /> <br /> Join our free monthly newsletter for ideas you can use. Retirement Wisdom clean 36:45
Take the Detour – A Second Act Career Story – Melissa Davey https://www.retirementwisdom.com/should-i-stay-or-should-i-go-podcast/ Fri, 22 Jun 2018 18:19:53 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=8013 In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Melissa Davey Melissa is  a filmmaker who re-invented herself and pivoted to her second career in her mid-sixties. She is just completing her first documentary feature-film: The Beyond Sixty Project. Melissa shares her advice on making a big mid-life career shift and what she has learned from the women in her film. Which path will you choose when you have an opportunity for a great Second Act?Click To Tweet Bio: Melissa Davey is a documentary filmmaker who lives in Valley Forge, PA. She is a wife, a mother and a grandmother to three young boys. Melissa is a world traveler and curious about everything unknown. She recently retired after more than two decades from GENEX Services Inc., where she was recruited to build and operate the company's Social Security representation division. GENEX is the largest Managed Care case management organization in the U.S. Prior to GENEX, Melissa had almost twenty years of diversified experience in the field of disability. She held senior leadership and management positions throughout her career. Melissa's second act career is fueled by a lifelong passion for film and story-telling. Wise Quotes: "Right away, when I just said I'm going be a filmmaker, I immediately got an idea to do a documentary about women like me. Women who were over the age of 60 but who were continuing to be relevant and not hanging it up, not just retiring in the true sense. Some of them were going onto second and third acts. Some were just staying in their current positions and expanding them or changing their roles somehow. But I wanted to highlight the storytelling aspect of it because when I started to do research for the project, all I could find were celebrity women. The only older women that you'll find as you Google women with great stories are people you've heard of - celebrities. So, it took some digging and talking to lots of people and getting referrals...to see if women would be interested in telling their stories, because I think that there is great value in not just the younger generation hearing these stories, but also older women and women and men who are thinking of making a change later in life." "I think that's the argument that we have with ourselves where, frankly, I couldn't argue with myself any longer. It was more the opposite -  why wouldn't you do it now because if you don't do it now, you're not going to do it at all. And talking with, obviously, lots of women now over the age of 60, they have the same sentiment that there's this train that you get on in life and sometimes you just stay on it. You don't think too much about other things that you might do but when you do, you realize that, as you age, you just gain more experience.  You gain more confidence and you have the ability to learn.  As long as you're healthy you have the ability to learn new things." "And I'm not sure where this whole notion comes from that when you get old you lose your abilities. Now, if you're sick, that's one thing. But, honestly, I'm smarter than I was 20, 30, 40 years ago. And that's based just on the experiences I've had. I'm just more well-rounded so, you know. And I think people forget that or don't think about it." "I think people get into a rhythm. It's life. You do your thing every day, your routine. Coming out of the routine opens you up. Just when we were kids and we would go to school and we'd learn a new subject or we'd talk to a teacher. I consider myself very lucky. And if I hadn't thought about all this and done all this, I would ...(wow). I'm not an extraordinary person and it's very clear to me, I know I'm not. I know that I'm an average person but I know that I am willing to take risks." Stick Around for the Noteworthy segment - where we discuss a recent article worth reading This week’s article is: Be Optimistic. You Might Live Longer! -from the Center for Retirement Research at Boston In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Melissa Davey Melissa is  a filmmaker who re-invented herself and pivoted to her second career in her mid-sixties. She is just completing her first documentary feature-film: The Beyond Sixty Project.
Melissa shares her advice on making a big mid-life career shift and what she has learned from the women in her film.

Which path will you choose when you have an opportunity for a great Second Act?
Click To Tweet


Bio:

Melissa Davey is a documentary filmmaker who lives in Valley Forge, PA. She is a wife, a mother and a grandmother to three young boys. Melissa is a world traveler and curious about everything unknown. She recently retired after more than two decades from GENEX Services Inc., where she was recruited to build and operate the company’s Social Security representation division. GENEX is the largest Managed Care case management organization in the U.S. Prior to GENEX, Melissa had almost twenty years of diversified experience in the field of disability. She held senior leadership and management positions throughout her career. Melissa’s second act career is fueled by a lifelong passion for film and story-telling.

Wise Quotes:

“Right away, when I just said I’m going be a filmmaker, I immediately got an idea to do a documentary about women like me. Women who were over the age of 60 but who were continuing to be relevant and not hanging it up, not just retiring in the true sense. Some of them were going onto second and third acts. Some were just staying in their current positions and expanding them or changing their roles somehow. But I wanted to highlight the storytelling aspect of it because when I started to do research for the project, all I could find were celebrity women. The only older women that you’ll find as you Google women with great stories are people you’ve heard of – celebrities. So, it took some digging and talking to lots of people and getting referrals…to see if women would be interested in telling their stories, because I think that there is great value in not just the younger generation hearing these stories, but also older women and women and men who are thinking of making a change later in life.”
“I think that’s the argument that we have with ourselves where, frankly, I couldn’t argue with myself any longer. It was more the opposite –  why wouldn’t you do it now because if you don’t do it now, you’re not going to do it at all. And talking with, obviously, lots of women now over the age of 60, they have the same sentiment that there’s this train that you get on in life and sometimes you just stay on it. You don’t think too much about other things that you might do but when you do, you realize that, as you age, you just gain more experience.  You gain more confidence and you have the ability to learn.  As long as you’re healthy you have the ability to learn new things.”
“And I’m not sure where this whole notion comes from that when you get old you lose your abilities. Now, if you’re sick, that’s one thing. But, honestly, I’m smarter than I was 20, 30, 40 years ago. And that’s based just on the experiences I’ve had. I’m just more well-rounded so, you know. And I think people forget that or don’t think about it.”
“I think people get into a rhythm. It’s life. You do your thing every day, your routine. Coming out of the routine opens you up. Just when we were kids and we would go to school and we’d learn a new subject or we’d talk to a teacher. I consider myself very lucky. And if I hadn’t thought about all this and done all this, I would …(wow). I’m not an extraordinary person and it’s very clear to me, I know I’m not. I know that I’m an average person but I know that I am willing to take risks.”

Stick Around for the Noteworthy segmentwhere we discuss a recent article worth reading

This week’s article is: Be Optimistic. You Might Live Longer! -from the Center for Retirement Research at Boston

For more on Melissa Davey:

Visit the website of her upcoming film The Beyond Sixty Project:

Follow Melissa on:

Twitter:@DaveyLissa

Instagram:#beyond60

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/beyondsixtyProject/

And if you’re interested in learning more about the saxophonist mentioned who’s also pursuing his dream:

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Related Retirement Podcast Episodes:

 

Are You Ready to Follow Your Own Path in Retirement?

Why Baby Boomers Are Making a Career Change Driven by Purpose

Will You Be an Entrepreneur in Your Second Act?

 

 

 

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In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Melissa Davey Melissa is  a filmmaker who re-invented herself and pivoted to her second career in her mid-sixties. She is just completing her first documentary feature-film: The Beyond Sixty Proje... In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Melissa Davey Melissa is  a filmmaker who re-invented herself and pivoted to her second career in her mid-sixties. She is just completing her first documentary feature-film: The Beyond Sixty Project.<br /> <br /> Melissa shares her advice on making a big mid-life career shift and what she has learned from the women in her film.<br /> <br /> <br /> Which path will you choose when you have an opportunity for a great Second Act?Click To Tweet<br /> <br /> Bio:<br /> Melissa Davey is a documentary filmmaker who lives in Valley Forge, PA. She is a wife, a mother and a grandmother to three young boys. Melissa is a world traveler and curious about everything unknown. She recently retired after more than two decades from GENEX Services Inc., where she was recruited to build and operate the company's Social Security representation division. GENEX is the largest Managed Care case management organization in the U.S. Prior to GENEX, Melissa had almost twenty years of diversified experience in the field of disability. She held senior leadership and management positions throughout her career. Melissa's second act career is fueled by a lifelong passion for film and story-telling.<br /> <br /> Wise Quotes:<br /> "Right away, when I just said I'm going be a filmmaker, I immediately got an idea to do a documentary about women like me. Women who were over the age of 60 but who were continuing to be relevant and not hanging it up, not just retiring in the true sense. Some of them were going onto second and third acts. Some were just staying in their current positions and expanding them or changing their roles somehow. But I wanted to highlight the storytelling aspect of it because when I started to do research for the project, all I could find were celebrity women. The only older women that you'll find as you Google women with great stories are people you've heard of - celebrities. So, it took some digging and talking to lots of people and getting referrals...to see if women would be interested in telling their stories, because I think that there is great value in not just the younger generation hearing these stories, but also older women and women and men who are thinking of making a change later in life."<br /> <br /> <br /> "I think that's the argument that we have with ourselves where, frankly, I couldn't argue with myself any longer. It was more the opposite -  why wouldn't you do it now because if you don't do it now, you're not going to do it at all. And talking with, obviously, lots of women now over the age of 60, they have the same sentiment that there's this train that you get on in life and sometimes you just stay on it. You don't think too much about other things that you might do but when you do, you realize that, as you age, you just gain more experience.  You gain more confidence and you have the ability to learn.  As long as you're healthy you have the ability to learn new things."<br /> <br /> "And I'm not sure where this whole notion comes from that when you get old you lose your abilities. Now, if you're sick, that's one thing. But, honestly, I'm smarter than I was 20, 30, 40 years ago. And that's based just on the experiences I've had. I'm just more well-rounded so, you know. And I think people forget that or don't think about it."<br /> <br /> "I think people get into a rhythm. It's life. You do your thing every day, your routine. Coming out of the routine opens you up. Just when we were kids and we would go to school and we'd learn a new subject or we'd talk to a teacher. I consider myself very lucky. And if I hadn't thought about all this and done all this, I would ...(wow). I'm not an extraordinary person and it's very clear to me, I know I'm not. I know that I'm an average person but I know that I am willing to take risks."<br /> <br /> <br /> Stick Around for the Noteworthy segment - where we discuss a recent article worth reading<br /> Retirement Wisdom clean 42:58
Creating Your Second Act Career – Linda Hardenstein https://www.retirementwisdom.com/creating-your-second-act/ Sat, 05 May 2018 14:53:47 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=7870 In this episode of our retirement podcast, we interview Linda Hardenstein, a Career Reinventionist and career coach in California. Linda works with her clients to reinvent their careers –and often their lives. Her work as a career coach ranges from helping people make a career change, pivot to a new second career or assisting them in designing  an encore career. Linda shares her insights on what’s involved in making those types of moves, what obstacles people often encounter and how to get around them. Stick Around for the Noteworthy segment where we discuss a recent article worth reading. This time it’s about why studies are showing that many people are flocking back to work after they retire. What’s up with that? Noteworthy Segment The ‘unretired’: coming back to work in droves – Financial Times https://www.ft.com/content/041c69e0-cf82-11e7-9dbb-291a884dd8c6#myft:saved-articles:page       More Wisdom? Sign up for our free monthly newsletter for more ideas you can use. In this episode of our retirement podcast, we interview Linda Hardenstein, a Career Reinventionist and career coach in California. Linda works with her clients to reinvent their careers –and often their lives. Her work as a career coach ranges from helping people make a career change, pivot to a new second career or assisting them in designing  an encore career.

Linda shares her insights on what’s involved in making those types of moves, what obstacles people often encounter and how to get around them.

Stick Around for the Noteworthy segment where we discuss a recent article worth reading. This time it’s about why studies are showing that many people are flocking back to work after they retire. What’s up with that?

Noteworthy Segment

The ‘unretired’: coming back to work in droves – Financial Times

https://www.ft.com/content/041c69e0-cf82-11e7-9dbb-291a884dd8c6#myft:saved-articles:page

 

 


 

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In this episode of our retirement podcast, we interview Linda Hardenstein, a Career Reinventionist and career coach in California. Linda works with her clients to reinvent their careers –and often their lives. In this episode of our retirement podcast, we interview Linda Hardenstein, a Career Reinventionist and career coach in California. Linda works with her clients to reinvent their careers –and often their lives. Her work as a career coach ranges from helping people make a career change, pivot to a new second career or assisting them in designing  an encore career.<br /> <br /> Linda shares her insights on what’s involved in making those types of moves, what obstacles people often encounter and how to get around them.<br /> <br /> Stick Around for the Noteworthy segment where we discuss a recent article worth reading. This time it’s about why studies are showing that many people are flocking back to work after they retire. What’s up with that?<br /> <br /> Noteworthy Segment<br /> <br /> The ‘unretired’: coming back to work in droves – Financial Times<br /> <br /> https://www.ft.com/content/041c69e0-cf82-11e7-9dbb-291a884dd8c6#myft:saved-articles:page<br /> <br />  <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> More Wisdom?<br /> <br /> <br /> Sign up for our free monthly newsletter for more ideas you can use. Retirement Wisdom clean 36:04
The Soft Side of Retirement – Fritz Gilbert, The Retirement Manifesto https://www.retirementwisdom.com/preparing-well-for-the-soft-side-of-retirement/ Mon, 23 Apr 2018 12:13:39 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=7806 Today on our retirement podcast, we welcome The Retirement Manifesto to discuss the FIRE movement and how people striving to become Financially Independent and Retire Early (FIRE) can benefit by planning for the soft side of retirement. Fritz Gilbert is a corporate commodity trader, aspiring philosopher and lifelong financial hobbyist who is on the cusp of early retirement at 55. Fritz and his wife recently sold their primary home and moved into a cabin in the North Georgia mountains as part of their downsizing strategy for retirement. Fritz created his blog, The Retirement Manifesto, which he sees as "a canvas for helping people achieve a great retirement", to share their lessons learned during their journey. The Retirement Manifesto focuses on practical Financial Independence and Retirement Planning issues for folks within ten years of retirement. On our retirement planning podcast, he shares what he's learned and why your retirement planning should be balanced and include the non-financial side. You've done the math. You know you can retire early. But are you prepared for the soft side of retirement? Fritz Gilbert shares his advice.Click To Tweet Wise Quote: On the Importance of Purpose in Retirement: "I wrote, for probably the first 6 to 12 months, probably 80% of my articles were around that side of it but as I started reading more and thinking more and discovering more. What I discovered was that it's the non-financial side that dictates for most people how successful their transition into retirement's going to be. If you read the studies and the surveys about people that struggle on that transition into retirement, it's really normally not the financial side. It's the fact that they haven't given enough consideration and really deep, serious thought about what they want their purpose to be, what's going to fill their day, what's going to get them up in the morning, use whatever phrase you want to use but for the first time in your life you're responsible for filling your day with something that brings meaning and purpose."   Noteworthy: Stay around and listen to Denis and Joe discuss the article Design a Retirement That Excites You by Jeff Giesea – Harvard Business Review (11/2015) https://hbr.org/2015/11/design-a-retirement-that-excites-you       More Wisdom? Yes, please. Sign up for our free monthly newsletter with ideas you can use to balance your retirement planning. Today on our retirement podcast, we welcome The Retirement Manifesto to discuss the FIRE movement and how people striving to become Financially Independent and Retire Early (FIRE) can benefit by planning for the soft side of retirement.

Fritz Gilbert is a corporate commodity trader, aspiring philosopher and lifelong financial hobbyist who is on the cusp of early retirement at 55. Fritz and his wife recently sold their primary home and moved into a cabin in the North Georgia mountains as part of their downsizing strategy for retirement. Fritz created his blog, The Retirement Manifesto, which he sees as “a canvas for helping people achieve a great retirement”, to share their lessons learned during their journey. The Retirement Manifesto focuses on practical Financial Independence and Retirement Planning issues for folks within ten years of retirement. On our retirement planning podcast, he shares what he’s learned and why your retirement planning should be balanced and include the non-financial side.


You've done the math. You know you can retire early. But are you prepared for the soft side of retirement? Fritz Gilbert shares his advice.
Click To Tweet


Wise Quote:

On the Importance of Purpose in Retirement:

“I wrote, for probably the first 6 to 12 months, probably 80% of my articles were around that side of it but as I started reading more and thinking more and discovering more. What I discovered was that it’s the non-financial side that dictates for most people how successful their transition into retirement’s going to be. If you read the studies and the surveys about people that struggle on that transition into retirement, it’s really normally not the financial side. It’s the fact that they haven’t given enough consideration and really deep, serious thought about what they want their purpose to be, what’s going to fill their day, what’s going to get them up in the morning, use whatever phrase you want to use but for the first time in your life you’re responsible for filling your day with something that brings meaning and purpose.”

 

Noteworthy:

Stay around and listen to Denis and Joe discuss the article Design a Retirement That Excites You by Jeff Giesea – Harvard Business Review (11/2015)

https://hbr.org/2015/11/design-a-retirement-that-excites-you

 

 


 

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Today on our retirement podcast, we welcome The Retirement Manifesto to discuss the FIRE movement and how people striving to become Financially Independent and Retire Early (FIRE) can benefit by planning for the soft side of retirement. - Today on our retirement podcast, we welcome The Retirement Manifesto to discuss the FIRE movement and how people striving to become Financially Independent and Retire Early (FIRE) can benefit by planning for the soft side of retirement.<br /> <br /> Fritz Gilbert is a corporate commodity trader, aspiring philosopher and lifelong financial hobbyist who is on the cusp of early retirement at 55. Fritz and his wife recently sold their primary home and moved into a cabin in the North Georgia mountains as part of their downsizing strategy for retirement. Fritz created his blog, The Retirement Manifesto, which he sees as "a canvas for helping people achieve a great retirement", to share their lessons learned during their journey. The Retirement Manifesto focuses on practical Financial Independence and Retirement Planning issues for folks within ten years of retirement. On our retirement planning podcast, he shares what he's learned and why your retirement planning should be balanced and include the non-financial side.<br /> <br /> You've done the math. You know you can retire early. But are you prepared for the soft side of retirement? Fritz Gilbert shares his advice.Click To Tweet<br /> Wise Quote:<br /> On the Importance of Purpose in Retirement:<br /> <br /> "I wrote, for probably the first 6 to 12 months, probably 80% of my articles were around that side of it but as I started reading more and thinking more and discovering more. What I discovered was that it's the non-financial side that dictates for most people how successful their transition into retirement's going to be. If you read the studies and the surveys about people that struggle on that transition into retirement, it's really normally not the financial side. It's the fact that they haven't given enough consideration and really deep, serious thought about what they want their purpose to be, what's going to fill their day, what's going to get them up in the morning, use whatever phrase you want to use but for the first time in your life you're responsible for filling your day with something that brings meaning and purpose."<br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> Noteworthy:<br /> <br /> Stay around and listen to Denis and Joe discuss the article Design a Retirement That Excites You by Jeff Giesea – Harvard Business Review (11/2015)<br /> <br /> https://hbr.org/2015/11/design-a-retirement-that-excites-you<br /> <br />  <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />  <br /> <br /> More Wisdom? Yes, please.<br /> <br /> Sign up for our free monthly newsletter with ideas you can use to balance your retirement planning. Retirement Wisdom clean 44:11
The Unique Challenges Men and Women Face in Retirement – Thelma Reese https://www.retirementwisdom.com/whos-your-retirement-role-model/ Tue, 17 Apr 2018 02:14:25 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=7775 What's different in retirement planning for men and women? In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Dr. Thelma Reese, the co-author of two books with the late Barbara Fleisher - The New Senior Woman: Reinventing the Years Beyond Mid - Life and The New Senior Man: Exploring New Horizons, New Opportunities, which was published in 2017. Topics discussed include: What’s different about retirement today? What’s different in retirement for women and men? Where did all the role models go? What does it take to "Man Up" in retirement Her advice on retirement and retirement strategies What does it take to Man Up in retirement? Thelma Reese, author of The New Senior Man explains, based on her interviews of men who've navigated the transition.Click To Tweet Stick around for the Noteworthy segment where we discuss a recent article worth reading – this time it’s about our ability to change and learn in retirement.  Article: Can an Old Dog Really Learn New Tricks? (You’re the dog) MarketWatch.com  https://www.marketwatch.com/story/can-an-old-dog-really-learn-new-tricks-youre-the-dog-2018-03-12 Books by Thelma Reese: The New Senior Woman: Reinventing the Years Beyond Mid -Life https://amzn.to/2HckReU The New Senior Man: Exploring New Horizons, New Opportunities https://amzn.to/2GynkmP Looking for Even More Wisdom? Sign up for our free monthly newsletter with ideas you can use What’s different in retirement planning for men and women? In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Dr. Thelma Reese, the co-author of two books with the late Barbara Fleisher – The New Senior Woman: Reinventing the Years Beyond Mid – Life and The New Senior Man: Exploring New Horizons, New Opportunities, which was published in 2017. Topics discussed include:
  • What’s different about retirement today?
  • What’s different in retirement for women and men?
  • Where did all the role models go?
  • What does it take to “Man Up” in retirement
  • Her advice on retirement and retirement strategies


What does it take to Man Up in retirement? Thelma Reese, author of The New Senior Man explains, based on her interviews of men who've navigated the transition.
Click To Tweet


Stick around for the Noteworthy segment where we discuss a recent article worth reading – this time it’s about our ability to change and learn in retirement.  Article: Can an Old Dog Really Learn New Tricks? (You’re the dog) MarketWatch.com
Books by Thelma Reese: The New Senior Woman: Reinventing the Years Beyond Mid -Life
https://amzn.to/2HckReU
The New Senior Man: Exploring New Horizons, New Opportunities
https://amzn.to/2GynkmP

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What's different in retirement planning for men and women? In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Dr. Thelma Reese, the co-author of two books with the late Barbara Fleisher - The New Senior Woman: Reinventing the Years Beyond Mid - Li... What's different in retirement planning for men and women? In this episode of our retirement podcast, we talk with Dr. Thelma Reese, the co-author of two books with the late Barbara Fleisher - The New Senior Woman: Reinventing the Years Beyond Mid - Life and The New Senior Man: Exploring New Horizons, New Opportunities, which was published in 2017. Topics discussed include:<br /> <br /> What’s different about retirement today?<br /> What’s different in retirement for women and men?<br /> Where did all the role models go?<br /> What does it take to "Man Up" in retirement<br /> Her advice on retirement and retirement strategies<br /> <br /> What does it take to Man Up in retirement? Thelma Reese, author of The New Senior Man explains, based on her interviews of men who've navigated the transition.Click To Tweet<br /> Stick around for the Noteworthy segment where we discuss a recent article worth reading – this time it’s about our ability to change and learn in retirement.  Article: Can an Old Dog Really Learn New Tricks? (You’re the dog) MarketWatch.com<br />  https://www.marketwatch.com/story/can-an-old-dog-really-learn-new-tricks-youre-the-dog-2018-03-12<br /> <br /> Books by Thelma Reese: The New Senior Woman: Reinventing the Years Beyond Mid -Life<br /> https://amzn.to/2HckReU<br /> The New Senior Man: Exploring New Horizons, New Opportunities<br /> https://amzn.to/2GynkmP<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> Looking for Even More Wisdom?<br /> <br /> Sign up for our free monthly newsletter with ideas you can use Retirement Wisdom clean 41:58
What Can Millennials & Baby Boomers Learn From Each Other About Retirement? – Jim Frawley https://www.retirementwisdom.com/what-can-millennials-baby-boomers-learn-from-each-other-about-retirement/ Mon, 12 Mar 2018 19:34:07 +0000 https://www.retirementwisdom.com/?p=7674 In the first episode of our new retirement podcast, we talk with Leadership and Retirement Coach Jim Frawley, who coaches both Millennials and Baby Boomers. While Baby Boomers often talk about reinventing retirement, the Millennials are now ripping up that script. They discuss how Millennials think differently about retirement and what Baby Boomers can learn from them (and vice versa). Jim describes how the ‘No Rules’ world that Millennials operate in is empowering - and also challenging -when it comes to retirement. Stick around for the Noteworthy segment after talking with Jim, where we kick around the idea of YOLO, from an article in MarketWatch: https://www.marketwatch.com/story/why-retirees-should-loosen-their-purse-strings-and-embrace-the-yolo-2018-02-13#false Subscribe to our new retirement podcast and never miss an episode. Can't Get Enough Wisdom? Sign up for our monthly newsletter with ideas you can use. In the first episode of our new retirement podcast, we talk with Leadership and Retirement Coach Jim Frawley, who coaches both Millennials and Baby Boomers. While Baby Boomers often talk about reinventing retirement, the Millennials are now ripping up that script. They discuss how Millennials think differently about retirement and what Baby Boomers can learn from them (and vice versa). Jim describes how the ‘No Rules’ world that Millennials operate in is empowering – and also challenging -when it comes to retirement.

Stick around for the Noteworthy segment after talking with Jim, where we kick around the idea of YOLO, from an article in MarketWatch: https://www.marketwatch.com/story/why-retirees-should-loosen-their-purse-strings-and-embrace-the-yolo-2018-02-13#false

Subscribe to our new retirement podcast and never miss an episode.


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In the first episode of our new retirement podcast, we talk with Leadership and Retirement Coach Jim Frawley, who coaches both Millennials and Baby Boomers. While Baby Boomers often talk about reinventing retirement, In this episode, The Retirement Wise Guys talk with Leadership and Retirement Coach Jim Frawley, who coaches both Millennials and Baby Boomers. While Baby Boomers often talk about reinventing retirement, the Millennials are now ripping up that script. They discuss how Millennials think differently about retirement and what Baby Boomers can learn from them (and vice versa) . Jim describes how the ‘No Rules’ world that Millennials operate in is empowering - and also challenging -when it comes to retirement.<br />  <br /> Stick around for the Noteworthy segment after talking with Jim, where Joe and Denis kick around the idea of YOLO, from an article in Marketwatch: https://www.marketwatch.com/story/why-retirees-should-loosen-their-purse-strings-and-embrace the-yolo-2018-02-13 Retirement Wisdom clean 27:15